2014 to be Landmark Year for the Mainframe

The official announcement is still a few weeks away and the big event won’t take place until April, but the Internet is full of items about the 50th anniversary of the mainframe. Check some out here, here, and here.

In 1991 InfoWorld editor Stewart Alsop, predicted that on March 15, 1996 an InfoWorld reader would unplug the last mainframe.  Alsop wrote many brilliant things about computing over the years, but this statement will forever stand out as one of the least informed, as subsequent events amply demonstrated.  That statement, however, later became part of the inspiration for the name of this blog, DancingDinosaur. The mainframe did not march inexorably to extinction like the dinosaur as many, many pundits predicted.

It might have, but IBM made some smart moves over the years that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance for years to come.  DancingDinosaur marks 2000 as a key year in the ongoing relevance of the mainframe; that was the year IBM got serious about Linux on the System z. It was not clear then that Linux would become the widely accepted mainstream operating system it is today.  Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed.  There is no question that Linux on the System z has become mainstream.

But it wasn’t Linux alone that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance. Java enables the development of distributed type of workloads on the System z, which is only further advanced by WebSphere on z, and SOA on z. Today’s hottest trends—cloud, big data/analytics, mobile, and social—can be handled on the z too: cloud computing on z, big data/analytics/real-time analytics on z, mobile computing on z, and even social on z.

Finally, there is the Internet of things. This is a natural for the System z., especially if you combine it with MQTT, an open source transport protocol that enables minimized pub/sub messaging across mobile networks. With the z you probably will also want to combine it with the Really Small Message Broker (RSMB). Anyway, this will be the subject of an upcoming DancingDinosaur piece.

The net net:  anything you can do on a distributed system you can do on the System z and benefit from better resiliency and security built in. Even when it comes to cost, particularly TCO and cost per workload, between IBM’s deeply discounted System z Solution Editions and the introduction of the zBC12, which delivers twice the entry capacity for the same low cost ($75k) as the previous entry-level machine (z114), the mainframe is competitive.

Also coming up is Edge 2014, which focuses on Infrastructure Innovation this year. Please plan to attend, May 19-23 in Las Vegas.  Previous Edge conferences were worthwhile and this should be equally so. Watch DancingDinosaur for more details on the specific Edge programs.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

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