Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

Happy 50th System z

April 11, 2014

IBM threw a delightful anniversary party for the mainframe in NYC last Tuesday, April 8. You can watch video from the event here

About 500 people showed up to meet the next generation of mainframers, the top winners of the global Master of the Mainframe competition. First place went to Yong-Sian Shih, Taiwan; followed by Rijnard van Tonder, South Africa; and Philipp Egli, United Kingdom.  Wouldn’t be surprised if these and the other finalists at the event didn’t have job offers before they walked out of the room.

The System z may be built on 50-year old technology but IBM is rapidly driving the mainframe forward into the future. It had a slew of new announcements ready to go at the anniversary event itself and more will be rolling out in the coming months. Check out all the doings around the Mainframe50 anniversary here.

IBM started the new announcements almost immediately with Hadoop on the System z. Called  zDoop, the industry’s first commercial Hadoop for Linux on System z, puts map reduce big data analytics directly on the z. It also announced Flash for mainframe, consisting of the latest generation of flash storage on the IBM DS8870, which promises to speed time to insight with up to 30X the performance over HDD. Put the two together and the System z should become a potent big data analytics workhorse.

But there was even more. Mobile is hot and the mainframe is ready to play in the mobile arena too. Here the problem z shops experience is cost containment. Mainframe shops are seeing a concurrent rise in their costs related to integrating new mobile applications. The problem revolves around the fact that many mobile activities use mainframe resources but don’t generate immediate income.

The IBM System z Solution for Mobile Computing addresses this with new pricing for mobile workloads on z/OS by reducing the cost of the growth of mobile transaction volumes that can cause a spike in software charges. This new pricing will provide up to a 60% reduction on the processor capacity reported for Mobile activity, which can help normalize the rate of transaction growth that generates software charges. The upshot: much mobile traffic volume won’t increase your software overhead.

And IBM kept rolling out the new announcements:

  • Continuous Integration for System z – Compresses the application delivery cycle from months to weeks or days.   Beyond this IBM suggested upcoming initiatives to deliver full DevOps capabilities for the z
  • New version of IBM CICS Transaction Server – Delivers enhanced mobile and cloud support for CICS, able to handle more than 1 billion transactions per day
  • IBM WebSphere Liberty z/OS Connect—Rapid and secure enablement of web, cloud, and mobile access to z/OS assets
  • IBM Security zSecure SSE – Helps prevent malicious computer attacks with enhanced security intelligence and compliance reporting that delivers security events to QRadar SIEM for integrated enterprise- wide security intelligence dashboarding

Jeff Frey, an IBM Fellow and the former CTO of System z, observed that “this architecture was invented 50 years ago, but it is not an old platform.”  It has evolved over those decades and continues evolve. For example, Frey expects the z to accommodate 22nm chips and a significant increase in the increase in the number of cores per chip. He also expects vector technology, double precision floating point and integer capabilities, and FPGA to be built in. In addition, he expects the z to include next generation virtualization technology for the cloud to support software defined environments.

“This is a modern platform,” Frey emphasized. Other IBMers hinted at even more to come, including ongoing research to move beyond silicon to maintain the steady price/performance gains the computing industry has enjoyed the past number of decades.

Finally, IBM took the anniversary event to introduce a number of what IBM calls first-in-the-enterprise z customers. (DancingDinosaur thinks of them as mainframe virgins).  One is Steel ORCA, a managed service provider putting together what it calls the first full service digital utility center.  Based in Princeton, NJ, Phase 1 will offer connections of less than a millisecond to/from New York and Philadelphia. The base design is 300 watts per square foot and can handle ultra-high density configurations. Behind the operation is a zEC12. Originally the company planned to use an x86 system but the costs were too high. “We could cut those costs in half with the z,” said Dave Crocker, Steel ORCA chairman.

Although the Mainframe50 anniversary event has passed, there will be Mainframe50 events and announcements throughout the rest of the year.  Again, you can follow the action here.

Coming up next for DancingDinosaur is Edge2014, a big infrastructure innovation conference. Next week DancingDinosaur will look at a few more of the most interesting sessions, and there are plenty. There still is time to register. Please come—you’ll find DancingDinosaur in the bloggers lounge, at program sessions, and at the Sheryl Crow concert.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

 

The Next Generation of Mainframers

March 6, 2014

With seemingly every young person with any technology inclinations aiming to become the next WhatsApp and walk away with some of Facebook’s millions it is fair to wonder: Where is the next generation of mainframers going to come from and who are they going to be?

The answer: IBM is lining them up now. As the mainframe turns 50 you’ll have a chance to meet some of these up and coming mainframers as part of IBM’s 50th Mainframe Anniversary celebration in New York, April 8, when IBM announces winners of the World Championship round of its popular Master of the Mainframe competition.

According to IBM, the Championship is designed to assemble the best university students from around the globe who have demonstrated superior technical skills through participation in their regional IBM Master the Mainframe Contests. Out of the 20,000 students who have engaged in country-level Master the Mainframe Contests over the last three years, the top 44 students from 22 countries have been invited to participate in the inaugural IBM Master the Mainframe World Championship.

These students will spend the month of March working through the Systems of Engagement concept, an expansion of the traditional Systems of Record—core transaction systems—that have been the primary workload of mainframe computing. The students will deploy Systems of Record mainframe business applications written with Java and COBOL using DB2 for z/OS API’s to demonstrate how the Systems of Engagement concept takes full advantage of the mainframe’s advanced capabilities. In short, the mainframe is designed to support tomorrow’s most demanded complex workloads  Big Data, Cloud, and Mobile computing workloads and do them all with the most effective enterprise-class security. The students will showcase their applications on April 7, 2014 in New York City where judges will determine which student earns the distinction of “Master the Mainframe World Champion.”

Representing the United States are Mugdha Kadam from the University of Florida, Elton Cheng from the University of California San Diego, and Rudolfs Dambis from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. You can follow the progress of the competitors here.  After March 17 the site will include a leaderboard so you can follow your favorites. No rumors of betting pools being formed yet but it wouldn’t surprise DancingDinosaur.  Win or not, each competitor should be a prime candidate if your organization needs mainframe talent.

This is part of IBM’s longstanding System z Academic Initiative, which has been expanding worldwide and now encompasses over 64,000 students at more than 1000 schools across 67 countries.  And now high school students are participating in the Master the Mainframe competition. Over 360 companies are actively recruiting from these students, including Baldor, Dillards, JB Hunt, Wal-mart, Cigna, Compuware, EMC, Fidelity, JP Morgan Chase, and more.

Said Jeff Gill, at VISA: “Discovering IBM’s Academic Initiative has been a critical success factor in building a lifeline to our future—a new base of Systems Engineers and Applications Developers who will continue to evolve our mainframe applications into flexible open enterprise solutions while maintaining high volume / high availability demands. Without the IBM Academic Initiative, perhaps we could have found students with aptitude – but participation in the Academic Initiative demonstrates a student’s interest in mainframe technology which, to us, translates to a wise long-term investment.“ Gill is one of the judges of the Masters the Mainframe World Championship.

Added Martin Kennedy of Citigroup: “IBM’s Master the Mainframe Contest offers a great resource to secure candidates and helps the company get critical skills as quickly as possible.”

The Master of the Mainframe Championship and even the entire 50th Anniversary celebration that will continue all year are not really IBM’s primary mainframe thrust this year.  IBM’s real focus is on emphasizing the forward-moving direction of the mainframe. As IBM puts in: “By continually adapting to trends and evolving IT, we’re driving new approaches to cloud, analytics, security and mobile computing to help tackle challenges never before thought possible.  The pioneering innovations of the mainframe all serve one mission—deliver game-changing technology that makes the extraordinary possible and improves the way the world works.

DancingDinosaur covers the mainframe and other enterprise-class technology. Watch this blog for more news on the mainframe and other enterprise systems including Power, enterprise storage, and enterprise-scale cloud computing.

With that noted, please plan to attend Edge 2014, May 19-23 in Las Vegas. Being billed as an infrastructure and storage technology conference, it promises to be an excellent follow-on to last year’s Edge conference.  DancingDinosaur will be there, no doubt hanging out in the blogger’s lounge where everyone is welcome. Watch this blog for upcoming details on the most interesting sessions.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

February 25, 2014

How the 50 Year-Old Mainframe Remains Relevant

The mainframe turns 50 years old this year and the many pundits and experts who predicted it would be long gone by now must be scratching their heads.  Yes, it is still around and has acquired over 260 new accounts just since zEnterprise launch. It also has shipped over 320 hybrid computing units (not to be confused with zBX chassis only) since the zBX was introduced and kicked off hybrid mainframe computing.

As for MIPS, although IBM experienced a MIPS decline last quarter that follows the largest MIPS shipment in mainframe history a year ago resulting in a 2-year CGR of +11%.  (Mainframe sales follow the new product release cycle in a predictable pattern.) IBM brought out the last System z release, the zEC12, faster than the mainframe’s historic release cycle. Let’s hope IBM repeats the quick turnaround with the next release.

Here’s what IBM is doing to keep the mainframe relevant:

  • Delivered steady price/performance improvements with each release. And with entry-level BC-class pricing and the System z Solution Edition programs you can end up with a mainframe system that is as competitive or better than x86-based systems while being more secure and more reliable out of the box.
  • Adopted Linux early, before it had gained the widespread acceptance it has today. Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed. This year IBM reports a 31% increase in IFL MIPS. In at least two cases where DancingDinosaur recently interviewed IT managers, Linux on z was instrumental in bringing their shops to the mainframe.
  • Supported for SOA, Java, Web services, and cloud, mobile, and social computing continues to put the System z at the front of the hot trends. It also prominently plays with big data and analytics.  Who ever thought that the mainframe would be interacting with RESTful APIs? Certainly not DancingDinosaur’s computer teacher back in the dark ages.
  • Continued delivery of unprecedented scalability, reliability, and security at a time when the volumes of transactions, data, workloads, and users are skyrocketing.  (IDC predicts millions of apps, billions of users, and trillions of things connected by 2020.)
  • Built a global System z ecosystem of tools and technologies to support cloud, mobile, big data/analytics, social and non-traditional mainframe workloads. This includes acquisitions like SoftLayer and CSL Wave to deliver IBM Wave for z/VM, a simplified and cost effective way to harness the consolidation capabilities of the IBM System z platform along with its ability to host the workloads of tens of thousands of commodity servers. The mainframe today can truly be a fully fledged cloud player.

And that just touches on the mainframe platform advantages. While others boast of virtualization capabilities, the mainframe comes 100% virtualized out of the box with virtualization at every level.  It also comes with a no-fail redundant architecture and built-in networking. 

Hybrid computing is another aspect of the mainframe that organizations are just beginning to tap.  Today’s multi-platform compound workloads are inherently hybrid, and the System z can manage the entire multi-platform workload from a single console.

The mainframe anniversary celebration, called Mainframe50, officially kicks off in April but a report from the Pulse conference suggests that Mainframe50 interest already is ramping up. A report from Pulse 2014 this week suggests IBM jumped the gun by emphasizing how the z provides new ways never before thought possible to innovate while tackling challenges previously out of reach.

Pulse 2014, it turns out, offered 38 sessions on System z topics, of which 27 will feature analysts or IBM clients. These sessions promise to address key opportunities and challenges for today’s mainframe environments and the latest technology solutions for meeting them, including OMEGAMON, System Automation, NetView, GDPS, Workload Automation Tivoli Asset Discovery for z/OS and Cloud.

One session featured analyst Phil Murphy, Vice President and Principal Analyst from Forrester Research, discussing the critical importance of a robust infrastructure in a mixed mainframe/distributed cloud environment—which is probably the future most DancingDinosaur readers face—and how it can help fulfill the promise of value for cloud real time.

Another featured mainframe analyst Dot Alexander from Wintergreen Research who looked at how mainframe shops view executing cloud workloads on System z. The session focused on the opportunities and challenges, private and hybrid cloud workload environments, and the impact of scalability, standards, and security.

But the big celebration is planned for April 8 in NYC. There IBM promises to make new announcements, launch new research projects, and generally focus on the mainframe’s future.  A highlight promises to be Showcase 20, which will focus on 20 breakthrough areas referred to by IBM as engines of progress.  The event promises to be a sellout; you should probably talk to your System z rep if you want to attend. And it won’t stop on April 8. IBM expects to continue the Mainframe50 drumbeat all year with new announcements, deliverables, and initiatives. Already in February alone IBM has made a slew of acquisitions and cloud announcements that will touch every mainframe shop with any cloud interests (which should be every mainframe shop at one point or another).

In coming weeks stay tuned to DancingDinosaur for more on Mainframe50. Also watch this space for details of the upcoming Edge 2014 conference, with an emphasis on infrastructure innovation coming to Las Vegas in May.

Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

2014 to be Landmark Year for the Mainframe

February 10, 2014

The official announcement is still a few weeks away and the big event won’t take place until April, but the Internet is full of items about the 50th anniversary of the mainframe. Check some out here, here, and here.

In 1991 InfoWorld editor Stewart Alsop, predicted that on March 15, 1996 an InfoWorld reader would unplug the last mainframe.  Alsop wrote many brilliant things about computing over the years, but this statement will forever stand out as one of the least informed, as subsequent events amply demonstrated.  That statement, however, later became part of the inspiration for the name of this blog, DancingDinosaur. The mainframe did not march inexorably to extinction like the dinosaur as many, many pundits predicted.

It might have, but IBM made some smart moves over the years that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance for years to come.  DancingDinosaur marks 2000 as a key year in the ongoing relevance of the mainframe; that was the year IBM got serious about Linux on the System z. It was not clear then that Linux would become the widely accepted mainstream operating system it is today.  Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed.  There is no question that Linux on the System z has become mainstream.

But it wasn’t Linux alone that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance. Java enables the development of distributed type of workloads on the System z, which is only further advanced by WebSphere on z, and SOA on z. Today’s hottest trends—cloud, big data/analytics, mobile, and social—can be handled on the z too: cloud computing on z, big data/analytics/real-time analytics on z, mobile computing on z, and even social on z.

Finally, there is the Internet of things. This is a natural for the System z., especially if you combine it with MQTT, an open source transport protocol that enables minimized pub/sub messaging across mobile networks. With the z you probably will also want to combine it with the Really Small Message Broker (RSMB). Anyway, this will be the subject of an upcoming DancingDinosaur piece.

The net net:  anything you can do on a distributed system you can do on the System z and benefit from better resiliency and security built in. Even when it comes to cost, particularly TCO and cost per workload, between IBM’s deeply discounted System z Solution Editions and the introduction of the zBC12, which delivers twice the entry capacity for the same low cost ($75k) as the previous entry-level machine (z114), the mainframe is competitive.

Also coming up is Edge 2014, which focuses on Infrastructure Innovation this year. Please plan to attend, May 19-23 in Las Vegas.  Previous Edge conferences were worthwhile and this should be equally so. Watch DancingDinosaur for more details on the specific Edge programs.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

A Maturity Model for the New Mainframe Normal

February 3, 2014

Last week Compuware introduced its new mainframe maturity model designed to address what is emerging as the new mainframe normal. DancingDinosaur played a central role in the creation of this model.

A new mainframe maturity model is needed because the world of the mainframe is changing rapidly.  Did your data center team ever think they would be processing mainframe transactions from mobile phones? Your development team probably never imagined they would be architecting compound workloads across the mainframe and multiple distributed systems running both Windows and Linux? What about the prospect of your mainframe serving up millions or even billions of customer-facing transactions a day?  But that’s the mainframe story today.

Even IBM, the most stalwart of the mainframe vendors, repeats the driving trends—cloud, mobile, social, big data, analytics, Internet of things—like a mantra. As the mainframe celebrates its 50th anniversary year, it is fitting that a new maturity model be introduced because there is, indeed, a new mainframe normal rapidly evolving.

Things certainly are changing in ways most mainframe data center managers wouldn’t have anticipated 10 years ago, probably not even five years ago. Of those, perhaps the most disconcerting change for traditional mainframe shops is the need to accommodate distributed, open systems (systems of engagement) alongside the traditional mainframe environment (systems of record).

Since the rise of distributed systems two decades ago, there has existed both a technical and cultural gap between the mainframe and distributed teams. The emergence of technologies like hybrid computing, middleware, and the cloud have gone far to alleviate the technical gap. The cultural gap is not so amenable to immediate fixes. Still, navigating that divide is no longer optional – it has become a business imperative.  Crossing the gap is what the new maturity model addresses.

Many factors contribute to the gap; the largest of which appears to be that most organizations still approach the mainframe and distributed environments as separate worlds. One large financial company, for example, recently reported that they view the mainframe as simply MQ messages to distributed developers.

The new mainframe maturity model can be used as a guide to bridging both the technical and cultural gaps.  Specifically, the new model defines five levels of maturity. In the process, it incorporates distributed systems alongside the mainframe and recognizes the new workloads, processes and challenges that will be encountered. The five levels are:

  1. Ad-hoc:  The mainframe runs core systems and applications; these represent the traditional mainframe workloads and the green-screen approach to mainframe computing.
  2. Technology-centric:  An advanced mainframe is focused on ever-increasing volumes, higher capacity, and complex workload and transaction processing while keeping a close watch on MIPS consumption.
  3. Internal services-centric:  The focus shifts to mainframe-based services through a service delivery approach that strives to meet internal service level agreements (SLAs).
  4. External services-centric:  Mainframe and non-mainframe systems interoperate through a services approach that encompasses end-user expectations and tracks external SLAs.
  5. Business revenue-centric:  Business needs and the end-user experience are addressed through interoperability with cloud and mobile systems, services- and API-driven interactions, and real-time analytics to support revenue initiatives revolving around complex, multi-platform workloads.

Complicating things is the fact that most IT organizations will likely find themselves straddling different maturity levels. For example, although many have achieved levels 4 and 5 when it comes to technology the IT culture remains at levels 1 or 2. Such disconnects mean IT still faces many obstacles preventing it from reaching optimal levels of service delivery and cost management. And this doesn’t just impact IT; there can be ramifications for the business itself, such as decreased customer satisfaction and slower revenue growth.

DancingDinosaur’s hope is that as the technical cultures come closer through technologies like Java, Linux, SOA, REST, hybrid computing, mobile, and such to allow organizations to begin to close the cultural gap too.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

SOA Software Enables New Ways to Tap Mainframe Code

January 30, 2014

Is the core enterprise processing role handled by the mainframe enough? Yet, enterprises today often are running different types of workloads built using different app dev styles. These consist of compound applications encompassing the mainframe and a variety of distributed systems (Linux, UNIX, Windows) and different programming models, data schema, services, and more. Pieces of these workloads may be running on the public cloud, a partner’s private cloud, and a host of other servers. The pieces are pulled together at runtime to support the particular workload.  Mainframe shops should want to play a big role in this game too.

“Mainframe applications still sit at heart of enterprise operations, but mainframe managers also want to take advantage of these applications in new ways,” says Brent Carlson, SVP at SOA Software. The primary way of doing this is through SOA services, and mainframes have been playing in the SOA arena for years. But it has never been as seamless, easy, and flexible as it should. And as social and mobile and other new types of workloads get added to the services mix, the initial mainframe SOA approach has started to show its age. (Over the years, DancingDinosaur has written considerably on mainframe SOA and done numerous SOA studies.)

That’s why DancingDinosaur welcomes SOA Software’s Lifecycle Manager to the mainframe party.  It enables what the company calls a “RESTful Mainframe,” through governance of REST APIs that front zOS-based web services. This amounts to a unified platform from a governance perspective to manage both APIs as well as existing SOA assets. As Carlson explained: applying development governance to mainframe assets helps mainframe shops overcome the architectural challenges inherent in bringing legacy systems into the new API economy, where mobile apps need rapid, agile access to backend systems.

The company is aiming to make Lifecycle Manager into the system-of-record for all enterprise assets including mainframe-based SOAP services and RESTful APIs that expose legacy software functionality. The promise: seamless access to service discovery and impact analysis whether on mainframe, distributed systems, or partner systems. Both architects and developers should be able to map dependencies between APIs and mainframe assets at the development stage and manage those APIs across their full lifecycles.

Lifecycle Manager integrates with SOA’s Policy Manager to work either top down or bottom up.  The top down approach relies on a service wrapping of existing mainframe programs. Think of this as the WSDL first approach to designing web services and then developing programs on mainframe to implement it.  The bottom up approach starts with the copy book.  Either way, it is automated and intended to be seamless. It also promises to guide services developers on best practices like encryption, assign and enforce correct policies, and more.

“Our point: automate whatever we can, and guide developers into good practices,” said Carlson.  In the process, it simplifies the task of exposing mainframe capabilities to a broader set of applications while not interfering with mainframe developers.  To distributed developers the mainframe is just another service endpoint that is accessed as a service or API.  Nobody has to learn new things; it’s just a browser-based IDE using copy books.

For performance, the Lifecycle Manager-based runtime environment is written in assembler, which makes it fast while minimizing MIPS consumption. It also comes with the browser-based IDE, copybook tool, and import mappings.

The initial adopters have come from financial services and the airlines.  The expectation is that usage will expand beyond that as mainframe shops and distributed developers seek to leverage core mainframe code for a growing array of workloads that weren’t on anybody’s radar screen even a few years ago.

There are other ways to do this on the mainframe, starting with basic SOA and web services tools and protocols, like WSDL. Many mainframe SOA efforts leverage CICS, and IBM offers additional tools, most recently SoftLayer, that address the new app dev styles.

This is healthy for mainframe data centers. If nothing else SOA- and API-driven services workloads that include the mainframe help lower the cost per workload of the mainframe. It also puts the mainframe at the center of today’s IT action.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

Enterprise 2013—System z Storage, Hybrid Computing, Social and More

October 10, 2013

The abstract for the Enterprise 2013 System z program runs 43 pages. Haven’t tallied the number of sessions offered but there certainly are enough to keep you busy for the entire conference (Oct. 20-25, in Orlando, register now) and longer.

Just the storage-related sessions are wide ranging, from  DFSM, which DancingDinosaur covered a few weeks back following the SHARE Boston event here, to the IBM Flash portfolio, System z Flash Express, dynamically provisioning Linux on z storage, capacity management, and more. For storage newcomers, there even is a two-part session on System z Storage Basics.

A storage session titled the Evolution of Space Management looks interesting.  After the advent of System Managed Storage (SMS), the mainframe went decades without much change in the landscape of space management processing. Space management consisted of the standard three-tier hierarchy of Primary Level 0 and the two Migration tiers, Migration Level 1 (disk) and Migration Level 2 (tape).This session examines recent advances in both tape and disk technologies that have dramatically changed that landscape and provided new opportunities for managing data on the z. Maybe they will add a level above primary called flash next year. This session will cover how the advances are evolving the space management hierarchy and what to consider when determining which solutions are best for your environment.

IBM has been going hog-wild with flash, the TMS acquisition playing no small part no doubt. Any number of sessions deal with flash storage. This one, IBM’s Flash Portfolio and Futures, seems particularly appealing. It takes a look at how IBM has acquired and improved upon flash technology over what amounts to eight generations technology refinements.  The session will look at how flash will play a major role across not only IBM’s storage products but IBM’s overall solution portfolio. Flash technology is changing the way companies are managing their data today and it is changing the way they understand and manage the economics of technology. This session also will cover how IBM plans to leverage flash in its roadmap moving forward.

Hybrid computing is another phenomenon that has swept over the z in recent years. For that reason this session looks especially interesting, Exploring the World of zEnterprise Hybrid: How Does It Work and What’s the Point? The IBM zEnterprise hybrid system introduces the Unified Resource Manager, allowing an IT shop to manage a collection of one or more zEnterprise nodes, including an optionally attached zBX loaded with blades for different platforms, as a single logical virtualized system through a single mainframe console. The mainframe can now act as the primary point of control through which data center personnel can deploy, configure, monitor, manage, and maintain the integrated System z and zBX blades based on heterogeneous architectures but in a unified manner. It amounts to a new world of blades and virtual servers with the z at the center of it.

Maybe one of the hardest things for traditional z data center managers to get their heads around is social business on the mainframe. But here it is: IBM DevOps Solution: Accelerating the Delivery of Multiplatform Applications looks at social business and mobile along with big data, and cloud technologies as driving the demand for faster approaches to software delivery across all platforms, middleware, and devices. The ultimate goal is to push out more features in each release and get more releases out the door with confidence, while maintaining compliance and quality. To succeed, some cultural, process, and technology gaps must be addressed through tools from Rational.

IBM has even set itself up as a poster child for social business in another session, Social Business and Collaboration at IBM, which features the current deployment within IBM of its social business and collaboration environments. Major core components are currently deployed on System z. The session will look at what IBM is doing and how they do it and the advantages and benefits it experiences.

Next week, the last DancingDinosaur posting before Enterprise 2013 begins will look at some other sessions, including software defined everything and Linux on z.

When DancingDinosaur first started writing about the mainframe over 20 years ago it was a big, powerful (for the time), solid performer that handled a few core tasks, did them remarkably well, and still does so today. At that time even the mainframe’s most ardent supporters didn’t imagine the wide variety of things it does now as can be found at Enterprise 2013.

Please follow DancingDinosaur and its sister blogs on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Enterprise 2013 Offers a Packed Program of System z, zEnterprise, Linux on z Sessions

October 3, 2013

IBM’s Enterprise 2013 conference in Orlando is coming up soon, starting Oct. 21. It will combine the System z and the Power Systems technical universities with an Executive Summit. DancingDinosaur will be there and just had a chance to look over the System z session catalog, all 43 pages packed with interesting System z programs. Here are few that should be of particular interest.

BYOD –The Return of Terminals. DancingDinosaur touched on this just a couple of weeks ago here. The session will delve into what it sees as an IT revolution, where mobile devices start replacing PCs the way PCs replaced terminals. So why is this good news for the mainframe data center? Because it brings control of end user computing back to the mainframe data center.  Other mobile System z sessions look at ways to connect mobile apps to the z, the use of Worklight with the z, and the basics of enterprise mobile computing

z/OS Applications –Adapting at the Speed of Business.  The session looks at how to respond to business people hammering on your door to make changes to production applications immediately. Typically these changes are small, more about changing the business behavior of the application than any real structural change, or maybe they are timed to your business cycle.  In any case, the session examines ways to handle those changes with shorter turnaround while also establishing a common terminology between you and the business analysts.  IBM has decision management technology that can tightly integrate with your existing COBOL and PL/I applications to handle those changes. A sort of IBM’s version of DevOps for the z although it also has DevOps solutions. Anyway, the result can be more stable applications performing as well or better than they do now, while delivering the behavior the business wants. Specifically, the session will show how to use the IBM Operational Decision Manager to make your z/OS applications more responsive to the ever-changing demands of the business teams.

Moving from a Legacy Mainframe System to a Modern Environment—a case study. Actually Enterprise 2013 appears to be packed with case studies. Here Fidelity Investments will discuss how it moved from a legacy z system to a modernized agile z-based environment that supports the requirements of their customers. The session will focus on how Fidelity used Rational tools on z to build out and deploy the new environment.

IBM DevOps Solution: Collaborative Development to Spark Innovation and Integration among Teams—as it turns out, Enterprise 2013 features a number of sessions focused on DevOps, which combines app dev with an agile deployment approach. The basic idea is that application development cannot be sustained in disjointed silos. New mobile, social, big data and analytics projects demand the development process to be fast, integrated, creative, and affordable. Furthermore, business needs change quickly, making it necessary to re-prioritize work and shift resources to different projects efficiently. With advanced, productive and unified development environments from Rational and middleware from CICS, this session will show you how you can apply talent across boundaries and keep the focus on innovation and high quality code development and test.

A related session is IBM DevOps Solution: Accelerating the Delivery of Multiplatform Applications. Here mobile, social, big data, and cloud technologies are driving the demand for faster and more recurrent approaches to software delivery across all platforms, middleware, and devices. The ultimate goal is to push out significantly more features in each release and get more releases out the door with confidence, while maintaining compliance and quality. DevOps is hot; if your shop hasn’t tuned into DevOps yet, Enterprise 2013 will be a good place to get up to speed.

Moving CICS Applications into the Cloud—the cloud is going to be increasingly central in almost all you do going forward and CICS has to be there. This session introduces CICS TS 5.1 as new infrastructure to increase your service agility and move towards a service delivery platform for cloud computing. For agile service delivery, CICS resources are packaged together, hosted as applications on a platform, and managed dynamically with policies. The latest release of CICS IA (Interdependency Analyzer) allows you to gain far greater insight into your applications and their dependencies while fine-tuning application performance and identifying bottlenecks. And then there is the CICS concept of a platform. Platforms provide services and resources so that applications can be rapidly deployed based on their requirements, combined with policies that enable the behavior of applications and platforms to be managed by determining whether tasks running as part of a platform, as an application, or as types of operations within an application. Expect many CICS sessions on every topic imaginable as CICS emerges as one of the central components of IBM’s expanded idea of the mainframe.

The Enterprise 2013 program is rich with System z material. DancingDinosaur will take up more of it next week. In the meantime, please register for the conference and feel welcome to introduce yourself to me at the event. You’ll find me wherever analysts, bloggers, and journalists hang out. Also, feel welcome to follow me on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Latest BMC Mainframe Survey Points to Bright System z Future

September 27, 2013

BMC Software released its 8th annual mainframe survey, and the results shouldn’t surprise any readers of DancingDinosaur. Get a copy of the results here. The company surveyed over 1000 managers and executives at mainframe shops around the world, mostly BMC customers.  Guess you shouldn’t be surprised at how remarkably traditional the respondents’ attitudes about the mainframe are.

For example, of the new areas identified by IBM as hot—mobile, cloud, big data, social business—cloud, big data, and mobile barely registered and social was nowhere to be seen.  Cloud was listed as one of the top four priorities by 19% of the respondents. Big data was listed as one of the top priorities for the coming year by only 18% of the respondents, the same as mobile.  The only topic that was less of a priority was outsourcing at 15%.

So what were the main priorities? The top four:

  • IT cost reduction—85% of respondents
  • Application availability—66%
  • Business/IT alignment—50%
  • Application modernization—50%

Where the researchers did drill down into one of the new areas of focus, big data, the biggest number of respondents, 31%, reported identifying the business use case as their biggest challenge. Other challenges were the cost of transforming/loading mainframe data to a centralized data warehouse (24%) followed by the effort such a transformation required (20%).  Another 11% noted the lack of ETL tools for business analytics.  Ten percent cited lack of knowledge about mainframe data content—huh? That might have been the one thing DancingDinosaur found truly surprising, although without knowing the specific job titles or job descriptions it might not be so surprising after all.

When it came to big data, 28% of the respondents expected to move mainframe data off the mainframe for analytics. An almost equal number (27%) expected the mainframe to act as the big data analytic engine.  Another 12% reported federating data to an off platform analytics engine. Three percent reported Linux on z for hosting the unstructured data.

Moving data off the mainframe for big data analytics can be a slow and costly strategy. One of the benefits of doing big data on the System z or the hybrid zEnterprise/zBX is taking advantage of the proximity of the data. Moving petabytes or even terabytes of data is not a trivial undertaking. For all the hype it’s clear that big data as a business strategy is still in its infancy with much left to be learned.  It will be interesting to see what this survey turns up a few years from now.

Otherwise, the survey results are very supportive to those who are fighting the seemingly perpetual battle of the mainframe as an end-of-life technology.  Almost all the respondents (93%) considered the mainframe a long-term business strategy while almost half (49%) felt the mainframe will continue to grow and attract new workloads.

Some other tidbits from the survey:

  • 70% of respondents said the mainframe will have a key role in Big Data plans.
  • 76% of large shops expect MIPS capacity to grow as they modernize and add applications to address business needs. (This highlights the need for software that minimizes expensive MIPS consumption and exploits the mainframe’s cost-efficient specialty engines.)

No large shops anyway—and only 7% of all respondents—have plans to eliminate their mainframe environment. Glad it’s not worse.

Lastly, there still is time to register for IBM’s Enterprise 2013 conference in Orlando. It will combine the System z and the Power Systems technical universities with an Executive Summit.  The session programs already are out for the System z and Power Systems tracks. Check out the System z overview here and the Power Systems overview here. DancingDinosaur will be there. In the coming weeks this blog will look more closely some intriguing sessions.

BTW–please follow DancingDinosaur at its new name on Twitter, @mainframeblog

zEnterprise Back to the Future— 3270 Mainframe Computing

August 30, 2013

Remember 3270 computing? Those were the pervasive green screen terminals that connected to the mainframe. The user would tab his or her way through seemingly endless screens to get anything done? At IBMer Frank DeGillio’s presentation on mobile and the mainframe during the recent SHARE conference in Boston this image popped up.

3270 terminal

3270 terminal

DancingDinosaur hasn’t seen one of these in years. It was the last slide in DeGillio’s deck for his session titled Mobile and the Mainframe. He covered mobile, cloud, VDI, and, suddenly, this!

DeGillio wasn’t actually advocating for a return to 3270 computing.  Rather he was describing the evolving reality of mobile, cloud, and VDI.  You end up with smart devices—mobile phones and tablets—that are configured with terrific compute, memory, communications, and display capabilities. Yet for all their capabilities, there still needs to be something else. And that is the enterprise’s data and business logic. Often that resides on distributed systems, which are quickly becoming latest legacy systems.

Especially at large enterprises, which may be supporting thousands of smart mobile devices, the data and business logic more often than not lies with the mainframe. No problem; the mainframe data center knows how to handle security, availability, and scalability for tens of thousands of concurrent users. This is what mainframe data centers have done going all the way back to the 3270 days and before.

When you come down to it, the 3270 device connected to the mainframe, wasn’t that much different from today’s smart devices needing to connect to the data and business logic residing in the data center. Sure, they have compelling displays and nifty features like swipe and tap or GPS and media but they still need the enterprise business logic and data.

Combine the profusion of smart mobile devices thanks to BYOD with VDI running on the hybrid zEnterprise to serve up their Windows office productivity applications along with business applications, business logic and enterprise data at massive scale to create what resembles a 3270 system on steroids.

This is not ready for prime time today, but with some of IBM’s recent statements of direction, it may be soon.  For example, IBM intends to provide additional platform support for z/OS to an updated Worklight, its primary mobile development and deployment tool.  The company anticipates extending Worklight support to both IBM System z hardware and the z/OS operating system in the future.

As for CICS, which would have to be play a key role, IBM intends, according to a recent statement of direction, to deliver enhanced support for mobile applications interacting with IBM CICS Transaction Server for z/OS (CICS TS) services, using the lightweight data-interchange format JavaScript Object Notation (JSON).  IBM also intends to introduce support for deploying qualified new CICS TS workloads on IBM zNALC logical partitions (LPARs). Qualified new CICS TS applications, including approved mobile and service-enabled applications running in the CICS TS Java Virtual Machine (JVM) Server, will be eligible for CICS TS one-time-charge (OTC) pricing when deployed to a zNALC LPAR.

“We’re going back to the 3270 world,” suggested DeGillio. Well, not exactly and not immediately.  But when the industry does move that way, the mainframe data center can take over much of the heavy lifting and use its mainframe scale and expertise to lower the cost, deliver performance, and manage resources.

Cloud and distributed people can’t do this nearly as well, DeGillio continued. “Cloud people need to start a server when they want to do something else. They don’t understand isolation and scale; they don’t understand how to run VDI to z/OS on the same platform.” But mainframe data center managers do, and that’s what it will take to lower enterprise mobile computing costs and make it work at scale.

Don’t start dusting off those 3270 terminals just yet.  You can, however, start thinking about tuning your 3270 processes and procedures for use with this new generation of connected smart mobile terminals.

One place you probably won’t find 3270 terminals will be at IBM’s upcoming Enterprise 2013 conference in Orlando, Oct. 21-25. This combines the System z and Power Systems Technical University with an Executive Summit on enterprise class systems. Dancing Dinosaur expects to be there, hoping to learn, among other things, more details of the POWER 8 processor, which IBM has just started revealing publicly. It is not too early to start planning to come.


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