Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

New IBM Initiatives Speed System z to Hybrid Cloud and IoT

November 20, 2014

Cloud computing, especially hybrid cloud computing, is going mainstream. Same is happening with the Internet of Things (IoT).  For mainframe shops unsure of how to get there IBM promises to speed the journey with the two recent initiatives.

Let’s start with hybrid clouds and the z. As IBM describes it, enterprises will continue to derive value from the existing investments in IT infrastructure while looking to the cloud to bolster business agility. The upshot: organizations increasingly are turning to hybrid clouds to obtain the best of both worlds by linking on-premises IT infrastructure to public cloud.

To that end, IBM has designed and tested various use cases around enterprise hybrid architecture involving System z and SoftLayer. These use cases focus on the relevant issues of security, application performance, and potential business cost.

One scenario introduces the cloud as an opportunity to enrich enterprise business services running on the z with external functionality delivered from the cloud.

hybrid use case

Here a retail payment system [click graphic to enlarge] is enriched with global functionality from a loyalty program that allows the consumer to accumulate points. It involves the z and its payment system, a cloud-based loyalty program, and the consumer using a mobile phone.

The hybrid cloud allows the z data center to maintain control of key applications and data in order to meet critical business service level agreements and compliance requirements while tapping the public cloud for new capabilities, business agility, or rapid innovation and shifting expenditure from CAPEX to OPEX.

Since the z serves as the data backbone for many critical applications it makes sense to connect on-premises System z infrastructure with an off-premises cloud environment. In its paper IBM suggests the hybrid architecture should be designed in a way that gives the businesses the flexibility to put their workloads and data where it makes most sense, mixing the right blend of public and private cloud services. And, of course, it also must ensure data security and performance. That’s why you want the z there.

To get started check out the uses cases IBM provides, like the one above. Already a number of organizations are trying the IBM hybrid cloud: Macy’s, Whirlpool, Daimler, and Sicoss Group. Overall, nearly half of IBM’s top 100 strategic outsourcing clients already implementing cloud solutions with IBM as they transition to a hybrid cloud model.

And if hybrid cloud isn’t enough to keep you busy, it also is time to start thinking about the IoT. To make it easier last month the company announced the IBM Internet of Things Foundation, an extension of Bluemix. Like Bluemix, this is a cloud service that, as IBM describes it, makes it possible for a developer to quickly extend an Internet-connected device such as a sensor or controller into the cloud, build an application alongside the device to collect the data, and send real-time insights back to the developer’s business. That data can be analyzed on the z too, using Hadoop on zLinux, which you read about here a few weeks ago.

IoT should be nothing new to System z shops. DancingDinosaur discussed it this past summer here. Basically it’s the POS or ATM network on steroids with orders on magnitude more complexity. IDC estimates that by 2020 there will be as many as 28 billion autonomous IoT devices installed. Today it estimates there are nine billion.

Between the cloud, hybrid clouds, and IoT, z data centers will have a lot to keep them busy. But with IBM’s new initiatives in both areas you can get simple, highly secure and powerful application access to the cloud, IoT devices, and data. With the IoT Foundation you can rapidly compose applications, visualization dashboards and mobile apps that can generate valuable insights when linked with back office enterprise applications like those on the z.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT writer/analyst. You can follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Also check out my other IT writing at Technologywriter.com and here.

Compuware Aims for Mainframe Literacy in CIOs

November 13, 2014

Many IT professionals, especially younger ones, are clueless about the mainframe. Chris O’Malley, president of the mainframe business at Compuware, has met CIOs who are versed in everything about IT and have seemingly done everything there is with computers, but “they are not literate about the mainframe.” That means the mainframe never comes to mind. IBM could give away a zEnterprise for free, which it comes close to doing today through the System z Solution Edition program and these CIOs would ignore it. O’Malley wants to address that.

compuware MainframeExcellence2025_cover

In response, Compuware is following the path of the IBM System z Academic Initiative, but without the extensive global involvement of colleges and universities, with a program called Mainframe Excellence 2025, which it describes as a generational call for strategic platform stewardship. “We’re also trying to debunk a lot of issues around the mainframe,” O’Malley continues.

compuware O'Malley headshot

Chris O’Malley, Pres. Mainframe, Compuware

Compuware refers to Mainframe Excellence 2025 as a manifesto, something of a call to arms for millennials to storm the IT gates and liberate IT management from enslavement to x86 computing. Somehow DancingDinosaur doesn’t see it happening exactly that way; it envisions coexistence and synergy.

Most of the Mainframe Excellence document goes over ground DancingDinosaur and many others have covered before. It is delightful, however, to see others refreshing the arguments. And, the document adds some interesting data. For instance, over 1.15 million CICS transactions are executed on System z every second of every day! That’s more than all Google searches, YouTube views, Facebook likes, and Twitter tweets combined.

It also pays homage to what it refers to as the mainframe’s culture of excellence. It characterizes this culture by rigorous adherence to a standard of excellence demonstrably higher than that associated with other platforms, notably x86. IT organizations actually expect, accept, and plan for problems and patches in other platforms (think Microsoft Patch Tuesday). Mainframe professionals, on the other hand, have zero-tolerance for downtime and system failures and the mainframe generally lives up to those high expectations.

Ironically, the document points out that the culture of excellence has created a certain chasm between mainframe professionals and the rest of IT. In fact, this ingrained zero-failure culture of the mainframe community—including both vendors and enterprise IT staffs—can sometimes put it at odds with the very spirit of innovation that allows the mainframe to deliver the repeated advances in price/performance and new capabilities that consistently produce tremendous value.

Compuware concludes its report with an action checklist:

  • Fully inventory existing mainframe data, applications (including business rules), capacity, utilization/MSUs and management tools, a veritable trove a value embedded in mainframe code and business rules.
  • Build a fact-based skills plan with a realistic timeline.
  • Ramp up current and road-mapped mainframe capabilities.
  • Rightsize investments in mainframe application stewardship.
  • Institute an immediate moratorium on short-term cost-cutting that carries long-term negative consequences.
  • Combat denial and hype in regards to non-mainframe platform capabilities, costs and risks.

And Compuware’s final thought should give encouragement to all those who must respond to the mainframe-costs-too-much complaint:  IT has a long history of under-estimating real TCO and marginal costs for new platforms while over-estimating their benefits. A more sober assessment of these platforms will make the strategic value and economic advantages of the mainframe much more evident in comparison.

Compuware certainly is on the right track with Mainframe Excellence 2025. Would like, however, to see the company coordinate its efforts with the System z Academic Initiative, the Master the Mainframe effort, and such.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT writer/analyst. You can follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Also check out my other IT writing at Technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Creates Comprehensive Cloud Security Portfolio

November 6, 2014

On Wednesday IBM introduced what it describes as the industry’s first intelligent security portfolio for protecting people, data, and applications in the cloud. Not a single product but a set of products that taps a wide range of IBM’s cloud security, analytics, and services offerings.  The portfolio dovetails with IBM’s end-to-end mainframe security solution as described at Enterprise2014 last month.

Cloud security certainly is needed. In a recent IBM CISO survey, 44% of security leaders said they expect a major cloud provider to suffer a significant security breach in the future; one that will drive a high percentage of customers to switch providers, not to mention the risks to their data and applications.  Cloud security fears have long been one of the biggest impediments to organizations moving more data, applications, and processes to the cloud. These fears are further complicated by the fact the IT managers feel that much their cloud providers do is beyond their control. An SLA only gets you so far.

2014 IBM study of CISO 44 high

The same survey found 86% of leaders surveyed say their organizations are now moving to cloud, of those three-fourths see their cloud security budget increasing over the next 3-5 years.

As is typical of IBM when it identifies an issue and feels it has an edge, the company assembles a structured portfolio of tools, a handful of which were offered Wednesday. The portfolio includes versions of IBM’s own tools optimized for the cloud and tools and technologies IBM has acquired.  Expect more cloud security tools to follow. Together the tools aim to manage access, protect data and applications, and enable visibility in the cloud.

For example, for access management IBM is bringing out Cloud Identity Services which  onboards and handles users through IBM-hosted infrastructure.  To safeguard access to cloud-deployed apps it is bringing a Cloud Sign-On service used with Bluemix. Through Cloud Sign-On developers can quickly add single-sign on to web and mobile apps via APIs.  Another product, Cloud Access Manager, works with SoftLayer to protect cloud applications with pattern-based security, multi-factor authentication, and context-based access control. IBM even has a tool to handle privileged users like DBAs and cloud admins, the Cloud Privilege Identity Manager.

Here is a run-down of what was announced Wednesday. Expect it to grow.

  • Cloud Identity Services—IBM Cloud Identity Services
  • Cloud Sign-On Service –IBM Single Sign On
  • Cloud Access Manager –IBM Security Access Manager
  • Cloud Privileged Identity Manager—IBM Security Privileged Identity Manager (v2.0)
  • Cloud Data Activity Monitoring—IBM InfoSphere Guardium Data Activity Monitoring
  • Cloud Mobile App Analyzer Service –IBM AppScan Mobile Analyzer
  • Cloud Web App Analyzer Service –IBM AppScan Dynamic Analyzer
  • Cloud Security Intelligence –IBM QRadar Security Intelligence (v7.2.4)
  • Cloud Security Managed Services –IBM Cloud Security Managed Services

Now let’s see how these map to what the z data center already can get with IBM’s End-to-End Security Solution for the Mainframe. For starters, security is built into every level of the System z structure: processor, hypervisor, operating system, communications, and storage.

In terms of security analytics; zSecure, Guardium, AppScan, and QRadar improve your security intelligence. Some of these tools are included in the new Cloud security portfolio. Intelligence is collected from z/OS, RACF, CA ACF2, CA Top Secret, CICS, and DB2. The zSecure suite also helps address compliance challenges. In addition, InfoSphere Guardium Real-time Activity Monitoring handles activity monitoring, blocking and masking, and vulnerability assessment.

Of course the z brings its crypto coprocessor, Crypto Express4S, which complements the cryptographic capabilities of CPACF. There also is a new zEC12 coprocessor, the EP11 processor, amounting to a Crypto Express adapter configured with the Enterprise PKCS #11 (EP11) firmware, also called the CEX4P adapter. It provides hardware-accelerated support for crypto operations that are based on RSA’s PKCS #11 Cryptographic Token Interface Standard. Finally, the z supports the necessary industry standards, like FIPS 140-2 Level 4, to ensure multi-tenanted public and private cloud workloads remain securely isolated. So the cloud, at least, is handled to some extent.

The mainframe has long been considered the gold standard for systems security. Now it is being asked to take on cloud-oriented and cloud-based workloads while delivering the same level of unassailable security. Between IBM’s end-to-end mainframe security solution and the new intelligent (analytics-driven) security portfolio for the cloud enterprise shops now have the tools to do the job right.

And you will want all those tools because security presents a complex, multi-dimensional puzzle requiring different layers of integrated defense. It involves not only people, data, applications, and infrastructure but also mobility, on premise and off premise, structured, unstructured, and big data. This used to be called defense in depth, but with the cloud and mobility the industry is moving far beyond that.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst with well over 20 years covering IT and the System z. You can find more of my writing at Technologywriter.com and here. Also follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Mainframe Appeal Continues in 9th BMC Survey

October 30, 2014

With most of the over 1100 respondents (91%) reporting that the mainframe remains a viable long-term platform for them and a clear majority (60%) expecting to increase MIPS due to the normal growth of legacy applications and new application workloads the z continues to remain well entrenched. Check out the results for yourself here.

Maybe even more reassurance comes from almost half the respondents who reported that they expect the mainframe to attract and grow new workloads.  Most likely these will be Java and Linux workloads but one-third of the respondents listed cloud as a priority, jumping it up to sixth on the list of mainframe priorities. Mobile was cited as priority by 27% of the respondents followed by big data with 26% respondents.

ibm zec12

Apparently IBM’s steady promotion of cloud, mobile, and big data for the z over the past year is working. At Enterprise2014 IBM even made a big news with real time analytics and Hadoop on the z along with a slew of related announcements.

That new workloads like cloud, mobile, and big data made it into the respondents’ top 10 IT priorities for the year didn’t surprise Jonathan Adams, BMC vice president/general manager for z solutions.  The ease of developing in Java and its portability make it a natural for new workloads today, he noted.

In the survey IT cost reduction/optimization tops the list of IT priorities for 2014 by a large margin, 70% of respondents, followed by application availability, 52%.  Rounding out the top five are application modernization with 48%, data privacy, 47%, and business/IT alignment, 44%. Outsourcing finished out the top 10 priorities with 16%.

When asked to look ahead in terms of MIPS growth, the large majority of respondents expected growth to continue or at least remain steady. Only 9% expected MIPS to decline and 6% expected to eliminate the mainframe.  This number has remained consistent for years, noted Adams. DancingDinosaur periodically checks in with shops that announce plans to eliminate their mainframe and finds that a year later many have barely made any progress.

The top mainframe advantages shouldn’t surprise you:  availability (53%); security (51%); centralized data serving (47%) and transaction throughput (42%). More interesting results emerged when the respondents addressed new workloads. The mainframe’s cloud role includes data access (33%), cloud management from Linux on z (22%) and dynamic test environments via self-service (15%). Surprisingly, when it comes to big data analytics, 34% report that the mainframe acts as their analytics engine. This wasn’t supposed to be the case, at least not until BigInsights and Hadoop on z gained more traction.

Meanwhile, 28% say they move data off platform for analytics, and 14% report they federate mainframe data to an off-platform analytics engine. Yet, more than 81% now incorporate the mainframe into their Big Data strategy, up from 70% previously. The non-finance industries are somewhat more likely to use the mainframe as the big data engine, BMC noted. Those concerned with cost should seriously consider doing their analytics on the z, where the data is. It is costly to keep moving data around.

In terms of mobility, making existing applications accessible for mobile ranked as the top issue followed by developing new mobile applications and securing corporate data on mobile devices. Mobile processing increases for transaction volume came in at the bottom of mobility issues, but that will likely change when mobile transactions start impacting peak workload volumes and trigger increased costs. Again, those concerned about costs should consider IBM’s mobile transaction discount, which was covered by DancingDinsosaur here in the spring.

Since cost reduction is such a big topic again, the survey respondents offered their cost reduction priorities.  Reducing resource usage during peak led the list.  Other cost reduction priorities included consolidating mainframe software vendors, exploiting zIIP and specialty engines (which have distinctly lower cost/MIPS), and moving workloads to Linux on z.

So, judging from the latest BMC survey the mainframe is far from dead. But at least one recent IT consultant and commentator, John Appleby, seems to think so. This prediction has proven wrong so often that DancingDinosaur has stopped bothering to refute it.

BTW, change came to BMC last year  in the form of an acquisition by a venture capital group. Adams reports that the new owners have already demonstrated a commitment to continued investment in mainframe technology products, and plans already are underway for next year’s survey.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. You can follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Or see more of his writing at Technologywriter.com or in wide-ranging blogs here.

Real-Time Analytics on z Lead at IBM Enterprise2014 Opening Day

October 8, 2014

Users have always been demanding about performance. But does the 5-minute rule noted by Tom Rosamilia in the opening keynote at IBM Enterprise2014 go too far? It now seems users expect companies to respond, or at least acknowledge, their comments, questions, or problems in five minutes. That means companies need to monitor and analyze social media in real-time and respond appropriately.

Building on client demand to integrate real-time analytics with consumer transactions, IBM yesterday announced new capabilities for its System z. Specifically, IBM is combining the transactional virtues of the z with big data analytic capabilities into a single, streamlined, end-to-end data system. This real-time integration of analytics and transaction processing can allow businesses to increase the value of a customer information profile with every interaction the customer makes.  It also promises one way to meet the 5-minute rule, especially when a customer posts a negative comment on social media.

With the new integrated capability you can apply analytics to social sentiment and customer engagement data almost as the transactions are occurring. The goal is to gain real-time insights, which you can do on the mainframe because the data already is there and now the real time analytics will be there. There is no moving of data or logic.  The mainframe already is doing this when it is being used for fraud prevention. This becomes another case where the mainframe can enable organizations to achieve real-time insights and respond within five minutes. Compared to fraud analysis the 5-minute expectation seems a luxury.

By incorporating social media into the real time analytic analysis on the mainframe you can gain an indication of how the business is performing in the moment, how you stack up to your competitors, and most importantly, meet the 5-minute response expectation.  Since we’re talking about pretty public social sentiment data, you also could monitor your competitors’ social sentiment and analyze that to see how well they are responding.

And then there are the more traditional things you can do with the integration of analytics with transactional data to provide real-time, actionable insights on commercial transactions as they occur. For example you could take advantage of new opportunities to increase sales or prevent customer churn.

According to IBM this is being driven by the rise of mobile and smartphones, numbering in the billions in a few years. The combination of massive amounts of data and consumers who are empowered with mobile access is creating a difficult challenge for businesses, IBM noted in the announcement. Consumers now expect an immediate response—the 5 minute rule—to any interaction, at any time, and through their own preferred channel of communication. Unfortunately, many businesses are trying to meet this challenge and deliver instantaneous, on-demand customer service with outdated IT systems that can only provide after-the-fact intelligence.

Said Ross Mauri, General Manager, System z, IBM Systems & Technology Group: “Off-loading operational data in order to perform analytics increases cost and complexity while limiting the ability of businesses to use the insights in a timely manner.” The better approach, he continued, is to turn to an end-to-end solution that makes analytics a part of the flow of transactions and allows companies to gain real time insights while improving their business performance with every transaction.

Of course,  Mauri was referring specifically to the System z.  However, Power Systems and especially the new POWER8 machines, which have a strong presence here at IBM Enterprise2014, can do it too. Speaker after speaker emphasized that the Power machines are optimized for lightning fast analytics, particularly real time analytics.

Still, this was a z announcement so IBM piled on a few more goodies for the z. These include new analytics capabilities for the mainframe to enable better data security and provide companies with the ability to integrate Hadoop big data with the z. Specifically, IBM is delivering:

  • IBM InfoSphere BigInsights for Linux on System z – Combines open-source Apache Hadoop with IBM innovations to deliver enterprise grade Hadoop for System z clients;
  • IBM DB2 Analytics Accelerator – Enhances data security while delivering 2000 times the response time for complex data queries.
  • New capabilities in Linux and the cloud for system z, such as IBM Elastic Storage for Linux on System z, which extends the benefits of Elastic Storage to the Linux environment on z servers, and IBM Cloud Manager with OpenStack for System z, which enables heterogeneous cloud management across System z, Power and x86 environments.

Many of these pieces are available now.  You can meet the 5-minute rule sooner than you may think.

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog, or check out his website, Technologywriter.com

 

Mobile Steps Up at IBM Enterprise2014

September 23, 2014

According to eMarketer, by 2017, mobile phone penetration will rise to 69.4% of the global population. The global smartphone audience, eMarketer reports, surpassed 1 billion in 2012 and will total 1.75 billion in 2014 and will continue a fast-paced trajectory through 2017.

OK, mobile and smartphones are hot, driving everything from the Internet of Things, (IoT) to shifts in mainframe peak volume trends. Between IoT and mobile you very well could looking at the future of the mainframe. IBM’s latest mainframe win, announced Sept. 11, identified the government of Croatia adopting the IBM z12EC 703 as the foundation for a new mobile government solution that enables citizens to choose to receive myriad messages and conduct official business on their mobile and smart devices while getting real time alerts.

Mobile transaction volumes already are starting to skew z/OS software usage and trigger new pricing programs. If you haven’t pinned down your mobile mainframe and Power Systems strategy, plan to get over to IBM Enterprise2014, Oct. 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. There you will find a wide range of mobile-related sessions for the System z, Power, and System i platforms.

You could start with Planning Your Mobile Enterprise Strategy: Future Directions in Enterprise Mobile Application Development by Ian Robinson. Here Robinson looks out the next 12-18 months at a new generation of mobile devices—including smartphones, tablets, wearables and other technologies comprising the IoT—being adopted in large numbers by consumers and employees while introducing considerable challenges and opportunities for enterprise IT managers and application developers. This session reviews the latest mobile trends and highlights where IBM MobileFirst software and services can help enterprise IT strategists prepare their organizations as mobile enterprises. BTW, last week IBM MobileFirst was highly endorsed by both Gartner and IDC.

You also will want to check out Robinson’s session on The MobileFirst Portfolio: IBM’s End-to-end Solution for the Enterprise Mobile App Development Lifecycle. Here he notes that the emerging era of enterprise mobile apps is radically different from traditional software delivery, leading many CIOs and IT managers to completely redefine their enterprise application strategies due to the rapid growth of smartphones and tablet devices among end users. In this session he describes IBM’s MobileFirst portfolio, an industry-leading set of products and capabilities designed to support the entire mobile app lifecycle, from design and development through to testing, integration, optimization, and deployment. Using real MobileFirst client examples, this session also highlights where IBM System z, Power Systems and PureSystems can play an essential role in supporting an enterprise mobile strategy.

A different take on mobile is IBM Electronic Support Engagement—Mobile Service Request, Support Portal, Twitter, Blogs and Wikis by Julie Craft.  Including a demo, she details all the ways you can use IBM electronic support tools from a mobile and social perspective. She presents new mobile apps as well as enhancements to service request that make working with IBM Support easier and saves time. In this session you are invited to voice your views on ways IBM can improve its interfaces to enhance your experience. She reports you’ll even have an opportunity to follow along on your mobile devices.

Finally, here’s a look at a hardware platform-specific mobile session: Mobile to Go, Overview of Mobile Technologies on IBM i by Tim Rowe, Alison Buterill. Android, Blackberry, iPhone, iPad, tablet, and on and on. So many mobile devices, so many applications. Employees want to work 24X7. They want access to email, to development, data, and the system. And they want to use their own interface from wherever they happen to be. How can you deliver the right interface to the right person at the right time? What is available to make the job easier? This session explores the various IBM i solutions that can help you deliver on the request to “Make Mine to Go”. A related session, Test Drive IBM i Mobile Access, provides a preview of the IBM i Mobile Access Solution in the form of a lab that offers a guided, self-paced, interaction with the solution. You can explore the 5250 interface, run SQL Queries, interact with Printed Output and the IFS and much more. Maybe, they suggest, you can take the lab from your own mobile device. Other sessions address mobile on the Power platform.

Without changing the mainframe’s basic role mobile is poised to dramatically alter mainframe computing. The z will continue as the always available, highly secure and scalable backend resource that delivers information on request and handles volumes of transactions.

Finally, don’t miss three evenings of live performances: 2 country rock groups, Delta Rae and The Wild Feathers and then, Rock of Ages. Check out all three and more here.

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Look for me at Enterprise2014. You can follow this blog and more on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Also, find me on Technologywriter.com.

IBM Enterprise2014 to Drive Advanced Mainframe Capabilities

August 27, 2014

The summer is winding down, and IBM Enterprise2014 (October 6-10, 2014 at the Venetian in Las Vegas, October 6-10, 2014 at the Venetian in Las Vegas) will be here in a little over a month.  It combines the IBM System z Technical University and the IBM Power Systems Technical University at one North American location. The advanced capabilities being featured at Enterprise2014 include: cloud, big data, and much more. Let’s look at a sampling of the z-oriented cloud and big data sessions. Subsequent posts will look at POWER and other topics.

The event also will include announcing the winner of the Mainframe Mobile App Throwdown, details here. Mobile is hot and poised to drive a lot of activity through the mainframe. The next generation of mobile apps will need to integrate with core applications running on the mainframe. DancingDinosaur readers know how to do that. Top prize for the Throwdown is an iPad, a pass to the IBM Enterprise2014 conference in Las Vegas, and even a week with IBM experts to help turn the app from a concept to reality. DancingDinosaur will be there to publicize the winners here. But the competition closes Sept. 17 so sign up soon.

For Mainframe Mobile App Throwdown ideas check out the session details at Enterprise2014. For example, Taking Analytics Mobile with DB2 Web Query and More! by Doug Mack digs into mobile features added to DB2 Web Query. He discusses how to sync a mobile device up with your favorite dashboards, or use the mobile app to organize and access reports offline. Leverage REST-based Web Services and application extensions to customize the user interface for reporting functions or schedule the reports to run in the background.

Now, let’s look at a sampling of the cloud and big data sessions.

How Companies Are Using IBM System z for Cloud—Fehmina Merchant describes how organizations are building secure and robust private clouds on System z to deliver their critical IT services with agility and at lower costs.  The session will examine the unique capabilities of zEnterprise as a platform for private cloud computing, in effect providing the ultimate in virtualization, security, scalability and reliability. It also will cover how the newest IBM SmartCloud technologies can automate and optimize the deployment and management of services in the cloud. In addition, the session will offer some specific real-life examples and use-cases to illustrate how a private cloud built on zEnterprise and SmartCloud provide flexible IT service delivery at the lowest cost. The session will end with a live demonstrations of the latest IBM SmartCloud tools.

Should mainframe shops even care about cloud computing? That’s a question DancingDinosaur gets asked frequently. Glenn Anderson answers it in zEnterprise—Cutting Through the Hype: Straight Talk About the Mainframe and Cloud Computing. In this session he promises to explain why the cloud is relevant to a System z enterprise and helps z data center managers cut through the marketing hype.

For zLinux there is The Elephant on the Mainframe—Using Hadoop to Analyze IBM System z Data by Christopher Spaight. He describes the zEnterprise portfolio as including a rich set of options for the analysis of structured, relational data. But what, he asks, if the business needs to analyze data that is unstructured or semi-structured or a mix of relational and non-relational records? Many are looking to Hadoop in these situations. This session lays out the mainframer’s options for using Hadoop both on and off platform, and walks through several use cases for when it makes sense to use Hadoop. BTW, Hadoop on z is called zDoop.

Finally, HDFS, Hive and All That Big Data “Stuff” for IBM System z by Karen Durward looks at how the System z participates in the world of HDFS, Hive and more Big Data stuff. This session focuses on not only why z/OS data should be integrated into a Big Data environment but the various ways to do it. She will describe the latest on z/OS data integration with Big Data, Linux on System z as a Big Data platform, and more.

Then, when you have absorbed all the technology you can enjoy three evenings of live performances: 2 country rock groups, Delta Rae and The Wild Feathers and then, Rock of Ages. Check ‘em out here.

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Look for me at Enterprise2014. You can follow this blog and more on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Find Alan Radding on Technologywriter.com.

IBM Mainframe Tweet-Up with Ross Mauri Generates Action

August 15, 2014

DancingDinosaur has participated in numerous Mainframe Tweet-Ups before, most recently Enterprise2013 and Edge2014.  The Tweet-Up last Tuesday (8/12) might have been the biggest yet, generating numerous questions and responses (over 120 in one hour by DancingDinosaur’s count) on a range of topics including Linux on the mainframe, mobile on the mainframe, and more.

A Tweet-Up is a Twitter event where a panel of experts respond to questions from an audience and interactive discussions revolve around the questions. Think of the Mainframe Tweet-Up as a very mini IBM Enterprise2014. But instead of one expert panel and 100+ participants there will be over 600 expert sessions, an army of IBM experts to present and respond to questions, and over 50 case studies where you can talk directly to the user and get the real nitty-gritty.

The central attraction of Tuesday’s Mainframe Tweet-Up was Ross Mauri, General Manager of the IBM System z business.  Mauri is a veteran of enterprise servers and systems, having previously held a similar position with Power Systems. Of course he is a strong proponent of the mainframe, but he also is a big advocate for mobile on the System z.

In a recent post Mauri notes that enterprise mobility will be a $30 billion market next year with twice as many corporate employees using their own mobile devices as they are today.  According to Gartner, by 2017, 25% of all enterprises will have a mobile app store.  Check out Mauri’s post, Mobility made possible with the mainframe, here.

Mauri really sees the System z as an essential platform for mobile: “Given IBM System z’s unprecedented enterprise scale, availability, cloud, analytics, and mobile capabilities, we (the IBM mainframe team) are poised to deliver value to clients’ enterprise mobility needs. The marketplace demands mobile capabilities and has for years because their customers demand it of them.  Across industries, consumers mandate immediate, any time access to their accounts and information.  Consider what’s possible when IBM System z delivers enterprise mobility to these institutions,” he wrote.

Africa stands to gain the most from mobile mainframe, especially when it comes to banking. Mauri continued. Nearly 80% of Africa’s population – 326 million people — is unbanked, denying them the ability to get education and business loans or support their families.  First National Bank (FNB) and the mainframe are changing that.  Using System z’s mobile bank-in-a-box solutions, FNB brings secure banking to the customer in ways they’re familiar with — to the tune of 234 million monthly mobile banking transactions.  IBM’s System z bank-in-a-box solutions eliminate the need for FNB’s customers to rely on couriers.  Families have their funds in seconds instead of days and save sizable courier fees.  For the people who now use this solution, their lives have been changed forever.

DancingDinosaur has been on top of the mobile mainframe since IBM first began talking about it in the spring of 2010, and most recently here and here. The mainframe, especially with the new discounted z/OS pricing, makes an ideal cost-efficient platform for mobile computing. The z is a particularly good choice since much of the processing resulting from mobile activity will be handled right on the z, probably even the same z.

Mobile certainly was a top topic in the Mainframe Tweet-Up. One discussion addressed whether mobile would increase mainframe workloads or just shift it to coming from different devices. Instead of using an ATM to check your balance, for example, you would use the bank’s mobile app. The responses were varied: everyone agreed that mobile would increase transaction volume overall, but the transactions would follow a different cycle, a predominantly read cycle. If you have an opinion, feel welcome to weigh in with a comment.

Another discussion focused on mainframe simplification and looked at z/OSMF and CICS Explorer as two simplification/GUI tools, along with z/OS HealthChecker, RTD, and PFA. A different discussion turned to APIs and the z; concluding that the z has the APIs to effectively work with SoftLayer and also connect with APIM. Another participant added that the z works with the RESTful API. And not surprisingly there was an active discussion on Linux on z. The expert panelists and participants overall kept things very lively.

The Mainframe Tweet-Up was a small taste of what is coming in IBM Enterprise2014, Oct. 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. Register now; last year’s event sold out. IBM is expecting over 3000 attendees.  DancingDinsosaur certainly will be there.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. You also can find him at Technologywriter.com.

Put the Mainframe at the Heart of the Internet of Things

August 4, 2014

Does the Internet of things (IoT) sound familiar? It should. Remember massive networks of ATMs connecting back to the mainframe?

The mainframe is poised to take on the IoT challenge writes Advanced Software Products Group, Inc. (ASPG), a company specializing in mainframe software, in an interesting document called the Future of the Mainframe.  Part of that future is the IoT, which IBM refers to in a Redbook Point of View as the Interconnecting of Everything.

In that Redbook the IoT is defined as a network of Internet-enabled, real-world objects—things—ranging from nanotechnology objects to consumer electronics, home appliances, sensors of all kinds, embedded systems, and personal mobile devices. The IoT also will encompass enabling network and communication technologies, such as IPv6 to get the unique address capacity, web services, RFID, and 4G networks.

The IoT Redbook cites industry predictions of upwards of 50 billion connected devices by 2020, a number 10x that of all current Internet hosts, including connected mobile phones. Based on that the Redbook authors note two primary IoT scalability issues:

  1. The sheer number of connected devices; the quantity of connected devices, mainly the number of concurrent connections (throughput) a system can support and the quality of service (QoS) that can be delivered. Here, authors note, Internet scalability is a critical factor. Currently, most Internet-connected devices use IPv4, which is based on a 32-bit. Clearly, the industry has to speed the transition to IPv6, which implements a 128-bit addressing scheme that can support up to 2128 addresses or 4 x 1038 devices, although some tweaking of the IPv6 standard is being proposed for IoT.
  1. The volume of generated data and the performance issues associated with data collection, processing, storage, query, and display. IoT systems need to handle both device and data scalability issues. From a data standpoint, this is big data on steroids.

As ASPG noted in its paper cited above, the mainframe is well suited to provide a central platform for IoT. The zEnterprise has the power to connect large dispersed networks, capture and process the mountains of data produced every minute, and provide the security and privacy companies and individuals demand. In addition, it can accept, process, and interpret all that data in a useful way. In short, it may be the only general commercial computing platform powerful enough today to crunch vast quantities of data very quickly and is already proven to perform millions of transactions per second and do it securely.

Even with a top end zEC12 configured to the hilt and proven to handle maximum transactions per second, you are not quite yet ready to handle the IoT as it is currently being envisioned. This IoT vision is much more heterogeneous in all dimensions than the massive reservation or POS or ATM networks the mainframe has proven itself with.

At least one major piece still needed: an industry-wide standard that defines how the various devices capture myriad information for a diverse set of applications involving numerous vendors and ensure everything can communicate and exchange information in a meaningful way. Not surprisingly, the industry already is working on it.

Actually, maybe too many groups. The IEEE points to a number of standards, projects and activities it is involved with that address the creation of what it considers a vibrant IoT. The Open Internet Consortium, consisting of a slew of tech-industry heavyweights like Intel, Broadcom, and Samsung, hope to develop standards and certification for devices involved in the IoT. Another group, the AllSeen Alliance, is promoting an open standard called AllJoyn with the goal of enabling ubiquitously connected devices. Even Google is getting into the act by opening up its Nest acquisition so developers can connect their various home devices (thermostats, security alarm controllers, garage door openers, and such) via a home IoT.

This will likely shake out the way IT standards usually do with several competing groups fighting it out. Probably too early to start placing bets. But you can be sure IBM will be right there. The company already has put an IoT stake in the ground here (as if the z wasn’t enough).  Whatever eventually shakes out, System z shops should be right in the middle of the IoT action.

Expect this will be subject of discussion at the upcoming IBM Enterprise 2014 conference, Oct. 6-10 in Las Vegas. Your blogger expects to be there. DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog or Technologywriter.com.


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