Posts Tagged ‘zEnterprise’

IBM-Apple Deal Enhanced by New z/OS Pricing Discounts

July 25, 2014

In the spring, IBM announced, almost as an aside, new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile transactions. At the time, it didn’t seem like a big deal. But IBM’s more recent announcement of its exclusive mobile partnership with Apple, covered by DancingDinosaur here, suddenly gives it much bigger potential.

The plan is to create apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad, allowing companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction. At the backend will be the mainframe.

Already zEnterprise shops, especially banks and financial services firms, are reporting growth in the volume of transactions that originate from mobile devices. The volume of these mobile-originated transactions in some cases is getting large enough to impact the four-hour peak loads that are used in calculating monthly costs.

Here’s the problem: you put out a mobile app and want people to use it. They do, but much of the workload being generated does not directly produce revenue. Rather, they are requesting data or checking invoices and balances. Kind of a bummer to drive up monthly charges with non-revenue producing work.

That’s where the new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile workloads come in. The new pricing reduces the impact of these mobile transactions on reported LPAR MSUs. Specifically, the Mobile Workload Pricing Reporting Tool (MWRT) will subtract 60% of the reported Mobile MSUs from a given LPAR in each hour, adjusting the total LPAR MSU value for that hour. Think of this as just a standard SCRT report with a discount built in to adjust for mobile workload impact.

So, what does that translate into in terms of hard dollar savings? DancingDinosaur had a private briefing with two IBMers who helped build the tool and asked that question. They are only in the earliest stages of getting actual numbers from users in the field; the tool only became available June 30.  Clearly the results depend on how many mobile transactions you are handling in each reporting hour and how you are handling the workloads.

There is a little work involved but the process won’t seem intimidating to mainframe shops accustomed to IBM’s monthly reporting process. Simply record mobile program transaction data, including CPU seconds, on an hourly basis per LPAR, load the resulting data file into the new tool, MWRT, each month using the IBM-specified CSV format, and run MWRT, submitting the results to IBM each month. It replaces the SCRT process.

The MWRT will function like a partial off-load from a software pricing perspective. When an LPAR value is adjusted, all software running in the LPAR will benefit from lower MSUs. The tool will calculate the monthly MSU peak for a given machine using the adjusted MSU values.

This brings us back to the hard dollar savings question. The answer: probably not much initially unless your mobile apps already generate a sizeable proportion of your peak transaction volume. But jump ahead six months or a year when the IBM-Apple partnership’s new iOS made-for-business apps are gaining traction your mobile transaction volume could be climbing substantially each month. At that point, savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars or more seem quite possible.

Of course, the new applications or the entire partnership could be a bust. In that case, you will have burned some admin time for a one-time set up. You’ll still experience whatever normal transaction growth your current mobile apps generate and collect your discounted MSU charges. Unless the big IT analysis firms are dead wrong, however, mobile transactions are not going away. To the contrary, they will only increase. The bottom line: negligible downside risk while the upside gain could be huge.

Hope to see you at IBM Enterprise 2014 in Las Vegas, Oct. 6-10. DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog and at Technologywriter.com

 

 

System z Takes BackOffice Role in IBM-Apple Deal

July 21, 2014

DancingDinosaur didn’t have to cut short his vacation and race back last week to cover the IBM-Apple agreement. Yes, it’s a big deal, but as far as System z shops go it won’t have much impact on their data center operations until late this year or 2015 when new mobile enterprise applications apparently will begin to roll out.

The deal, announced last Tuesday, promises “a new class of made-for-business apps targeting specific industry issues or opportunities in retail, healthcare, banking, travel and transportation, telecommunications, and insurance among others,” according to IBM. The mainframe’s role will continue to be what it has been for decades, the backoffice processing workhorse. IBM is not porting iOS to the z or Power or i or any enterprise platform.

Rather, the z will handle transaction processing, security, and data management as it always has. With this deal, however, analytics appears to be assuming a larger role. IBM’s big data and analytics capabilities is one of the jewels it is bringing to the party to be fused with Apple’s legendary consumer experience. IBM expects this combination—big data analytics and consumer experience—to produce apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad devices and ultimately, as IBM puts it, enable companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction—faster and easier than ever before.

In case you missed the point, this deal, or alliance as IBM seems to prefer, is about software and services. If any hardware gets sold as a result, it will be iPhones and iPads. Of course, IBM’s MobileFirst constellation of products and services stand to gain. Mainframe shops have been reporting a steady uptick in transactions originating from mobile devices for several years. This deal won’t slow that trend and might even accelerate it. The IBM-Apple alliance also should streamline and simplify working with and managing Apple’s mobile devices on an enterprise-wide basis.

According to IBM its MobileFirst Platform for iOS will deliver the services required for an end-to-end enterprise capability, from analytics, workflow and cloud storage to enterprise-scale device management, security and integration. Enhanced mobile management includes a private app catalog, data and transaction security services, and a productivity suite for all IBM MobileFirst for iOS offerings. In addition to on premise software solutions, all these services will be available on Bluemix—IBM’s development platform available through the IBM Cloud Marketplace.

One hope from this deal is that IBM will learn from Apple how to design user-friendly software and apply those lessons to the software it subsequently develops for the z and Power Systems. Would be interesting see what Apple software designers might do to simplify using CICS.

Given the increasing acceptance of BYOD when it comes to mobile, data centers will still have to cope with the proliferation of operating systems and devices in the mobile sphere. Nobody is predicting that Android, Amazon, Google, or Microsoft will be exiting the mobile arena as a result, at least not anytime soon.

Finally, a lot of commentators weighed in on who wins or loses in the mobile market. In terms of IBM’s primary enterprise IT competitors Oracle offers the Oracle Mobile Platform. This includes mobile versions of Siebel CRM, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, and a few more. HP offers mobile app development and testing and a set of mobile application services that include planning, architecture, design, build, integration, and testing.

But if you are thinking in terms of enterprise platform winners and losers IBM is the clear winner; the relationship with Apple is an IBM exclusive partnership. No matter how good HP, Oracle, or any of IBM’s other enterprise rivals might be at mobile computing without the tight Apple connection they are at a distinct disadvantage. And that’s before you even consider Bluemix, SoftLayer, MobileFirst, and IBM’s other mobile assets.

BTW, it’s not too early to start planning for IBM Enterprise 2014. Mark your calendar, Oct 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. This event should be heavily z and Power.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter @mainframeblog or at Technologywriter.com.

Extend the System z to the Cloud via IBM Bluemix

July 2, 2014

The System z offers an increasing number of cloud options.  At a SHARE conference this past spring Erich Amrehn, IBM Distinguished Engineer elaborated on Cloud Computing with IBM System z.  In his presentation, Amrehn focused on five cloud options: Solution Edition for Computing and Data Cloud, SAP Cloud, CICS Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Mobile solution for z. And that’s not even mentioning the z-based IBM Enterprise Cloud System.

Why should a z data center care?  In short, you risk being left behind. The next architecture will encompass traditional systems of record and the new systems of engagement. Both, according to Amrehn, are headed to the cloud.

From the cloud your data center can deliver on-demand self-service, ubiquitous network access, location-independent resource pooling, rapid elasticity (for storage, compute, and network), and pay-per-use. For this, Amrehn identifies 5 steps starting with virtualization. However, with his last step—patterns—many z shops drop the ball. All they have is Rational Programming Patterns via Rational Developer for System z.

Patterns become critical when the organization wants to capitalize on the agility, efficiency, orchestration, and optimization that are essential for gaining maximum value from clouds, especially hybrid clouds.

The easiest way to get started should be through IBM’s SmartCloud Entry and Linux on z. Amrehn notes just one catch: in the spring, IBM SmartCloud entry for z was still only a statement of direction: “IBM intends to update IBM SmartCloud Entry to support the System z platform…” DancingDinosaur, however, found a Starter kit of IBM SmartCloud Entry for IBM System z. Go figure. Still awaiting clarification from IBM (2 years ago DancingDinosaur wrote that SmartCloud Entry for z was imminent based on an IBM announcement that has since been pulled).

The hybrid cloud is emerging as IBM’s preferred cloud solution. The company suggests a 2-step path to the hybrid cloud: 1) select an automated cloud application platform and 2) capture the desired application(s) into a pattern. IBM’s PureSystems, particularly PureApplication, directly enable hybrid cloud innovation, especially with the IBM Pattern Engine and its support for a variety of containers.  Notice the evolution in IBM’s thinking around PureApplication. What started as integrated hardware with built-in expertise in the form of patterns is morphing into the PureApp software system and service with a cloud component.

For best results, you want expert-driven automation at the infrastructure, application, and deployment tiers. Through patterns, especially IBM patterns, you avoid any need to re-architect when shifting from on premise to off premise (and back, if needed). Without patterns, you must do everything manually, an inefficient and costly approach. You can find a selection of patterns at  the IBM Cloud Marketplace.

To capitalize on your hybrid cloud environment you eventually will want to augment it with new software—mobile apps, customer-driven innovations, whatever—apps that tap the capabilities of the latest devices and integrate with mobile and social environments. That’s why IBM is rolling out Bluemix, an integrated application development and deployment environment.

Bluemix is not your standard IBM licensed technology. IBM has adopted distinctly different pricing for Bluemix. Runtimes are charged by the GB-hours that your app runs, including some free per month. For IBM this truly is innovative pricing, and IBMers suggest it is a work in progress. Right now, pricing varies with each Bluemix service. Whatever mix of services you end up with, they will be tallied monthly and charged to your credit card.

The current charges look like this:

courtesy of IBM

courtesy of IBM

The goal is rapid app development; to go from idea to app in minutes, no coding. Instead assemble new apps using APIs and existing systems. Bluemix handles the heavy lifting (via Cast Iron) behind the scenes, including integrating with legacy systems.

And it works. A demo by San Francisco’s BART showed how they used Bluemix to build a mobile app in 15 days. EyeQ reduced operations costs by 30% by focusing on the apps and code while leaving Bluemix to handle the infrastructure. aPersona, which provides multi-factor authentication, used Bluemix to reduce the time to deploy a new customer from 2 days to 30 seconds.

Bluemix speeds development and deployment through instant access to IBM’s SoftLayer cloud infrastructure, IBM software, runtimes, third party services, and IBM DevOps services.  Now IBM needs to get the z completely wired in.

Expect to hear more about the z, Bluemix, SoftLayer, and hybrid clouds at IBM Enterprise 2014 this coming October in Las Vegas.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog and at Technologywriter.com

Automated System z Workload Capping Can Save Big Bucks

June 20, 2014

IBM’s Monthly License Charge (MLC) pricing can be a powerful tool to significantly lower the cost of software licensing for a mainframe shop. The problem: it is frightfully complicated. DancingDinosaur has attended conferences that scheduled multi-part sessions just to cover the basic material. Figuring out which pricing program you qualify for is itself a challenge and you probably want a lawyer looking over your shoulder. Find IBM’s System z pricing page here.

One particularly galling challenge is estimating and capping the 4-hour utilization for each LPAR.  You can easily find yourself in a situation where you exceed the cap on one LPAR, resulting in a surcharge, while you have headroom to spare on other LPARs. The trick is to stay on top of this by constantly monitoring workloads and shift activity among LPARs to ensure you don’t exceed a cap.

This requires a skilled mainframe staffer with both a high level of z/OS skill and familiarity with z workloads and LPARs. While you’re at it throw in knowledge of data center operations and the organization’s overall business direction. Finding such an expert is costly and not easily spared for constant monitoring. It’s a task that lends itself to automation.

And that’s exactly what BMC did earlier this week when it introduced Intelligent Capping (iCap) for zSeries mainframes. On average, according to BMC, companies that actively manage and effectively prioritize their mainframe workloads save 10-15 percent more on their monthly license charges than those who use a more passive approach. Furthermore, instead of assigning a costly mainframe workload guru to manually monitor and manage this, BMC promises that the costs can be reduced while also diminishing risk to the business through the use of its intelligent iCap software that understands workloads, makes dynamic adjustments, and automates workload capping.

The savings, according to BMC, can add up fast. In one example, BMC cited saving 161 MSUs, which translated for that organization to over $55k that month. Given that a mainframe shop spends anywhere from few hundred thousand to millions of dollars per month on MLC charges savings of just a few percent can be significant. One BMC customer reportedly expects intelligent capping to save it 12% each month. Caveat: DancingDinosaur has not yet been able to speak with any BMC iCap customer to verify these claims.

But assuming they are true, iCap is a no-brainer for any mainframe shop paying anything but the most minimal MLC. BMC charges for iCap based on the customer’s capacity. It is willing to discuss a shared gain model by which the iCap charges are based on how much is saved but none of those deals apparently have been finalized.

This seems like a straightforward challenge for a mainframe management tool vendor but DancingDinosaur has found only a few actually doing it—BMC, Softwareonz, and IBM. Softwareonz brings AutoSoftCapping. The product promises to maximize software cost efficiency for IBM zSeries platforms, and specifically z/OS. It does so by automatically adjusting defined capacity by LPAR based upon workload while maintaining a consistent overall defined capacity for your CPC.

Softwareonz, Seattle, estimates it saves 2% on monthly charges, on the low end. At the high end, it has run simulations suggesting 20% savings.  AutoSoftCapping only works for datacenters running their z on the VWLC pricing model. Customers realistically can save 8-10%. Again, DancingDinosaur has not yet validated any savings with an actual Softwareonz customer.

Without automation, you have to do this manually, by adjusting defined capacity based on actual workloads. Too often that leave the organization with the choice of constraining workloads and thereby inhibiting performance or over-provisioning the cap and thereby driving up costs through wasted capacity.

So, if automatic MLC capping is a no brainer, why isn’t everybody doing it? Softwareonz sees several reasons, the primary one being the fear of the cap negatively impacting the VWLC four-hour rolling average. Nobody wants to impact their production workloads. Of course, the whole reason to apply intelligence to the automation is to reduce software costs without impacting production workloads. BMC offers several ways to ease the organization into this as they become more comfortable and confident in the tool.

Another reason suggested is that the System z operational team is protecting its turf from the inroads of automation. A large z shop might use a team of half a dozen or more people dedicated to monitoring and managing workloads manually. Bring in automation like iCAP or AutoSoftCapping and they expect pink slips to follow.

Of course, IBM brings the z/OS Capacity Provisioning tool for z/OS (v1.9 and above), which can be used to add and remove capacity through a Capacity Provisioning Manager (CPM) policy. This can be used to automatically control the defined capacity limit or the group capacity limits. The user interface for defining CPM policies is through z/OSMF.

If you are subject to MLC pricing, consider an automated tool. BTW, there also are consultants who will do this for you.

A note: IBM Enterprise Cloud System, covered by DancingDinosaur a few weeks ago here, is now generally available. It is an OpenStack-based converged offering that includes compute, storage, software, and services built around the zBC12. Check out the most recent details here.

Also take note: IBM Enterprise2014 is coming to Las Vegas in early Oct, Details here. The conference combines System z University and Power System University plus more. You can bet there will be multiple sessions on MLC pricing in its various permutations and workload capping.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. You can follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Or visit his website, www.technologywriter.com

 

Expanding Mainframe Linux and Cloud Computing

June 9, 2014

In case you wondered if IBM is seriously committed to both mainframe Linux and cloud computing on the System z platform you need only look at the June 2 announcement that the company is opening the first dedicated System z Linux and cloud computing competency center in Beijing.  According to the announcement, the new center is specifically intended to help organizations there take advantage of Linux and cloud computing solutions on the mainframe, and help accelerate adoption of Linux on System z in China.

This is just the most recent of a number of developments that boosted the System z profile. Even at the recent IBM Edge 2014 conference, which was not about the System z at all (a System z and Power conference, Enterprise 2014, is coming up in October) still managed to slip in some System z sessions and content, including one about protecting DB2 data on z/OS using tape and other sessions that included the System z and Power enterprise servers in discussions on various aspects of cloud computing or the use of flash.

Following the Mainframe50 announcement earlier in the spring, IBM introduced more System z enhancements including the IBM Enterprise Cloud System, an OpenStack-based converged offering that includes compute, storage, software, and services and built around the zBC12; IBM Wave for z/VM, which simplifies z/VM virtualization management and expedites an organization’s path to the cloud; and a new IBM Cloud Management Suite for System z, which handles dynamic provisioning and performance monitoring.

An interesting aspect of this announcement is the IBM’s focus on Linux. It has taken a decade for Linux to gain traction in System z data centers but patience is finally paying off.  Linux has proven instrumental in bringing new mainframe users to the platform (DancingDinosuar previously reported on Algar, a Brazilian telco) ; according to IBM, more than 50% of all new mainframe accounts since 2010 run Linux. To that end, DancingDinosaur has long recommended the Enterprise Linux Server Solution Edition program, a deeply discounted package hardware, middleware, and software. It represents the best and maybe the only bargain IBM regularly offers.

Linux itself has proven remarkably robust and has achieved widespread acceptance among enterprises running a variety of platforms. According to the IDC, Linux server demand is rising due to demand from cloud infrastructure deployments. The researcher expects that demand to continue into the future. In the first quarter of 2014, Linux server revenue accounted for 30 percent of overall server revenue, an increase of 15.4 percent.

Along with cloud computing, collaborative development appears to be contributing to the continued growth and adoption of Linux. According to the Linux Foundation, a new business model has emerged in which companies are joining together across industries to share development resources and build common open source code bases on which they can differentiate their own products and services. This collaborative approach promises to transform a number of industries, especially those involved with cloud computing, social and mobile. Apparently it provides a fast way to create the next generation of technology products.

In its latest survey, the Linux Foundation identified three drivers or the recent Linux growth:

  1. Collaborative software development—ninety-one percent of business managers and executives surveyed ruled collaborative software development somewhat to very important to their business while nearly 80 percent say collaborative development practices have been seen as more strategic to their organization over the past three years.
  2. Growing investments in collaborative software development—44 percent of business managers said they would increase their investments in collaborative software development in the next six months
  3. The benefits of collaboration—more than 77 percent of managers said collaborative development practices have benefited their organizations through a shorter product development cycle/faster time to market.

The bulk of the world’s critical transaction processing and production data continue to reside on the mainframe, around 70 percent, according to IBM. Similarly, 71% of all Fortune 500 companies have their core businesses on a mainframe. And this has remained remarkably steady over the past decade despite the rise of cloud computing. Of course, all these organizations have extensive multi-platform data centers and are adding growing numbers of on-premise and increasingly hybrid cloud systems.

Far from relying on its core production processing to carry the mainframe forever, the new Beijing mainframe Linux-cloud center demonstrates IBM’s intent to advance the mainframe platform in new markets. It is opening the mainframe up in a variety of ways; from z/OS in the cloud to Hadoop for z to new cloud-like pay-for-use pricing models. Watch DancingDinosaur for an upcoming post on the new pricing discounts for mobile transactions on z/OS.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding and can be followed on Twitter, @mainframeblog

IBM Edge2014 as Coming out Party for OpenStack

May 7, 2014

IBM didn’t invent OpenStack (Rackspace and NASA did), but IBM’s embrace of OpenStack in March 2013 as its standard for cloud computing made it a legit standard for enterprise computing. Since then IBM has made its intention to enable its product line, from the System z on down, for the OpenStack set of open source technologies.  Judging from the number of sessions at IBM Edge 2014, (Las Vegas, May 19-23 at the Venetian) that address one or another aspect of OpenStack you might think of IBM Edge2014 almost as a coming out celebration for OpenStack and enterprise cloud computing.

OpenStack is a collection of open source technologies. the goal of which is to provide a scalable computing infrastructure for both public and private clouds. As such it has become the foundation of IBM’s cloud strategy, which is another way of saying it has become what IBM sees as its future. An excellent mini-tutorial on OpenStack, IBM, and the System z can be found at mainframe-watch-Belgium here.

At IBM Edge2014 OpenStack is frequently included in sessions on storage, cloud, and storage management.  Let’s take a closer look at a few of those sessions.

IBM Storage and Cloud Technologies

Presenter Christopher Vollmar offers an overview of the IBM storage platforms that contain cloud technologies or provide a foundation for creating a private storage cloud for block and file workloads. This overview includes IBM’s SmartCloud Virtual Storage Center, SmartCloud Storage Access, Active Cloud Engine, and XIV’s Hyper-Scale as well as IBM storage products’ integration with OpenStack.

OpenStack and IBM Storage

Presenters Michael Factor and Funda Eceral explain how OpenStack is rapidly emerging as the de facto platform for Infrastructure as a Service. IBM is working fast to pin down the integration of its storage products with OpenStack. This talk presents a high level overview of OpenStack, with a focus on Cinder, the OpenStack block storage manager. They also will explain how IBM is leading the evolution of Cinder by improving the common base with features such as volume migration and ability to change the SLAs associated with the volume in the OpenStack cloud. Already IBM storage products—Storwize, XIV, DS8000, GPFS and TSM—are integrated with OpenStack, enabling self-provisioning access to features such as EasyTier or Real-time Compression via standard OpenStack interfaces. Eventually, you should expect virtually all IBM products, capabilities, and services to work with and through OpenStack.

IBM XIV and VMware: Best Practices for Your Cloud

Presenters Peter Kisich, Carlos Lizarralde argue that IBM Storage continues to lead in OpenStack integration and development. They then introduce the core services of OpenStack while focusing on how IBM storage provides open source integration with Cinder drivers for Storwize, DS8000 and XIV. They also include key examples and a demonstration of the automation and management IBM Storage offers through the OpenStack cloud platform.

IBM OpenStack Hybrid Cloud on IBM PureFlex and SoftLayer

Presenter Eric Kern explains how IBM’s latest version of OpenStack is used to showcase a hybrid cloud environment. A pair of SoftLayer servers running in IBM’s public cloud are matched with a PureFlex environment locally hosting the OpenStack controller. He covers the architecture used to set up this environment before diving into the details around deploying workloads.

Even if you never get to IBM Edge2014 it should be increasingly clear that OpenStack is quickly gaining traction and destined to emerge as central to Enterprise IT, any style of cloud computing, and IBM. OpenStack will be essential for any private, public, and hybrid cloud deployments. Come to Edge2014 and get up to speed fast on OpenStack.

Alan Radding/DancingDinosaur will be there. Look for me in the bloggers lounge between and after sessions. Also watch for upcoming posts on DancingDinosaur about OpenStack and the System z and on OpenStack on Power Systems.

Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Best System z TCO in Cloud and Virtualization

May 1, 2014

IBM recently analyzed various likely customer workload scenarios and found that the System z as an enterprise Linux server could consistently beat x86 machines in terms of TCO.  The analysis, which DancingDinosaur will dig into below, was reasonably evenhanded although, like automobile mileage ratings, your actual results may vary.

DancingDinosaur has long contended that the z Enterprise Linux Server acquired under the deeply discounted IBM System z Solution Edition program could beat comparable x86 based systems not only in terms of TCO but even TCA. Algar, a Brazilian telecom, acquired its initial z Enterprise Linux server to consolidate a slew of x86 systems and lay a foundation for scalable growth. It reports cutting data center costs by 70%. Nationwide Insurance, no newcomer to mainframe computing, used the zEnterprise to consolidate Linux servers, achieving $46 million in savings.

The point: the latest IBM TCO analyses confirm what IBM and the few IT analysts who talk to z customers have been saying for some time. TCO advantage, IBM found, switches to the z Enterprise Linux Server at around 200 virtual machines compared to the public cloud and a bit more VMs compared to x86 machines.

IBM further advanced its cause in the TCO/TCA battle with the recent introduction of the IBM Enterprise Cloud System. This is a factory-built and integrated system—processor, memory, network, IFLs, virtualization management, cloud management, hypervisor, disk orchestration, Linux OS—priced (discounted) as a single solution. IBM promises to deliver it in 45 days and have it production ready within hours of hitting the organization’s loading dock. Of course, it comes with the scalability, availability, security, manageability, etc. long associated with the z, and IBM reports it can scale to 6000 VMs. Not sure how this compares in price to a Solution Edition Enterprise Linux Server.

The IBM TCO analysis compared the public cloud, x86 cloud, and the Enterprise Cloud System in terms power and space, labor, software/middleware, and hardware costs when running 48 diverse (a range of low, medium, and high I/O) workloads. In general it found an advantage for the z Enterprise Cloud System of 34-73%.  The z cost considerably more in terms of hardware but it more than made up for it in terms of software, labor, and power. Overall, the TCO examined more than 30 cost variables, ranging from blade/IFL/memory/storage amounts to hypervisor/cloud management/middleware maintenance. View the IBM z TCO presentation here.

In terms of hardware, the z included the Enterprise Linux Server, storage, z/VM, and IBM Wave for z/VM. Software included WebSphere Application Server middleware, Cloud Management Suite for z, and Tivoli for z/VM. The x86 cloud included HP hardware with a hypervisor, WebSphere Application Server, SmartCloud Orchestrator, SmartCloud Monitoring, and Tivoli Storage Manager EE. Both analyses included labor to manage both hardware and VMs, power and space costs, and SUSE Linux.

The public cloud assumptions were a little different. Each workload was deployed as a separate instance. The pricing model was for AWS reserved instances. Hardware costs were based on instances in east US region with SUSE, EBS volume, data in/out, support (enterprise), free and reserved tier discounts applied. Software costs included WebSphere Application Server ND (middleware) costs for instances. A labor cost was included for managing instances.

When IBM applied its analysis to 398 I/O diverse workloads the results were similar, 49-75% lower cost with the Cloud System on z. Again, z hardware was considerably more costly than either x86 or the public cloud. But z software and labor was far less than the others. In terms of 3-year TCO, the cloud was the highest at $37 M, x86 came in at $18.3 M, and the Cloud on z cost $9.4 M. With 48 workloads, the z again came in with lowest TCO at $1 M compared to $1.6 M for x86 systems, and $3.9 M for the public cloud.

IBM kept the assumptions equivalent across the platforms. If you make different software and middleware choices or a different mix of high-mid-low I/O workloads your results will be different but the overall comparative rankings probably won’t change all that much.

Still time to register for IBM Edge2014 in Las Vegas, May 19-23. This blogger will be there hanging around the bloggers lounge when not attending sessions. Please join me there.

Follow Alan Radding/DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

Happy 50th System z

April 11, 2014

IBM threw a delightful anniversary party for the mainframe in NYC last Tuesday, April 8. You can watch video from the event here

About 500 people showed up to meet the next generation of mainframers, the top winners of the global Master of the Mainframe competition. First place went to Yong-Sian Shih, Taiwan; followed by Rijnard van Tonder, South Africa; and Philipp Egli, United Kingdom.  Wouldn’t be surprised if these and the other finalists at the event didn’t have job offers before they walked out of the room.

The System z may be built on 50-year old technology but IBM is rapidly driving the mainframe forward into the future. It had a slew of new announcements ready to go at the anniversary event itself and more will be rolling out in the coming months. Check out all the doings around the Mainframe50 anniversary here.

IBM started the new announcements almost immediately with Hadoop on the System z. Called  zDoop, the industry’s first commercial Hadoop for Linux on System z, puts map reduce big data analytics directly on the z. It also announced Flash for mainframe, consisting of the latest generation of flash storage on the IBM DS8870, which promises to speed time to insight with up to 30X the performance over HDD. Put the two together and the System z should become a potent big data analytics workhorse.

But there was even more. Mobile is hot and the mainframe is ready to play in the mobile arena too. Here the problem z shops experience is cost containment. Mainframe shops are seeing a concurrent rise in their costs related to integrating new mobile applications. The problem revolves around the fact that many mobile activities use mainframe resources but don’t generate immediate income.

The IBM System z Solution for Mobile Computing addresses this with new pricing for mobile workloads on z/OS by reducing the cost of the growth of mobile transaction volumes that can cause a spike in software charges. This new pricing will provide up to a 60% reduction on the processor capacity reported for Mobile activity, which can help normalize the rate of transaction growth that generates software charges. The upshot: much mobile traffic volume won’t increase your software overhead.

And IBM kept rolling out the new announcements:

  • Continuous Integration for System z – Compresses the application delivery cycle from months to weeks or days.   Beyond this IBM suggested upcoming initiatives to deliver full DevOps capabilities for the z
  • New version of IBM CICS Transaction Server – Delivers enhanced mobile and cloud support for CICS, able to handle more than 1 billion transactions per day
  • IBM WebSphere Liberty z/OS Connect—Rapid and secure enablement of web, cloud, and mobile access to z/OS assets
  • IBM Security zSecure SSE – Helps prevent malicious computer attacks with enhanced security intelligence and compliance reporting that delivers security events to QRadar SIEM for integrated enterprise- wide security intelligence dashboarding

Jeff Frey, an IBM Fellow and the former CTO of System z, observed that “this architecture was invented 50 years ago, but it is not an old platform.”  It has evolved over those decades and continues evolve. For example, Frey expects the z to accommodate 22nm chips and a significant increase in the increase in the number of cores per chip. He also expects vector technology, double precision floating point and integer capabilities, and FPGA to be built in. In addition, he expects the z to include next generation virtualization technology for the cloud to support software defined environments.

“This is a modern platform,” Frey emphasized. Other IBMers hinted at even more to come, including ongoing research to move beyond silicon to maintain the steady price/performance gains the computing industry has enjoyed the past number of decades.

Finally, IBM took the anniversary event to introduce a number of what IBM calls first-in-the-enterprise z customers. (DancingDinosaur thinks of them as mainframe virgins).  One is Steel ORCA, a managed service provider putting together what it calls the first full service digital utility center.  Based in Princeton, NJ, Phase 1 will offer connections of less than a millisecond to/from New York and Philadelphia. The base design is 300 watts per square foot and can handle ultra-high density configurations. Behind the operation is a zEC12. Originally the company planned to use an x86 system but the costs were too high. “We could cut those costs in half with the z,” said Dave Crocker, Steel ORCA chairman.

Although the Mainframe50 anniversary event has passed, there will be Mainframe50 events and announcements throughout the rest of the year.  Again, you can follow the action here.

Coming up next for DancingDinosaur is Edge2014, a big infrastructure innovation conference. Next week DancingDinosaur will look at a few more of the most interesting sessions, and there are plenty. There still is time to register. Please come—you’ll find DancingDinosaur in the bloggers lounge, at program sessions, and at the Sheryl Crow concert.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

 

One week to Mainframe50—Be There Virtually

April 1, 2014

Back in February, DancingDinosaur started writing about the upcoming Mainframe50 celebration. Now we’re just one week away from what will be a nearly year-long celebration, introductions of new mainframe advances, and more. It all starts on Tues., April 8 in New York City.

You can join through Livestream for the event and news briefing.  Just click here and join in from wherever you are virtually.

Or you can register to attend the event by clicking here. DancingDinosaur will be there and plans to file a report later that day on this blog and also be tweeting throughout all the Mainframe50 events. Follow it all on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Later this week, DancingDinosaur will be posting the latest in a series of reports from Edge 2014, being held in Las Vegas, May 19-23. There is still time to register and get a discount. You can find DancingDinosaur there in the Bloggers Lounge after sessions, keynotes, and the Sheryl Crow concert.

And please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

 

 

 

 

 

The Future of IBM Lies in the Cloud

March 13, 2014

In her annual letter to stockholders IBM CEO Virginia Rometty made it clear that the world is being forever altered by the explosion of digital data and by the advent of the cloud. So, she intends IBM to “remake the enterprise IT infrastructure for the era of cloud.” This where she is leading IBM.

DancingDinosaur thinks she has it right. But where does that leave this blog, which was built on the System z, Power Systems, and IBM’s enterprise systems? Hmm.

Rometty has an answer for that buried far down in her letter. “We are accelerating the move of our Systems product portfolio—in particular, Power and storage—to growth opportunities and to Linux, following the lead of our successful mainframe business. “

The rapidly emerging imperatives of big data, cloud computing, and mobile/social require enterprise-scale computing in terms of processing power, capacity, availability, security, and all the other ities that have long been the hallmark of the mainframe and IBM’s other enterprise class systems. She goes so far as to emphasize that point:  “Let me be clear—we are not exiting hardware. IBM will remain a leader in high-performance and high-end systems, storage and cognitive computing, and we will continue to invest in R&D for advanced semiconductor technology.”

You can bet that theme will be continued at the upcoming Edge 2014 conference May 19-23 in Las Vegas. The conference will include an Executive program, a Technical program with 550 expert technical sessions across 14 tracks, and a partner program. It’s being billed as an infrastructure innovation event and promises a big storage component too. Expect to see a lot of FlashSystems and XIV, which has a new pay-as-you-go pricing program that will make it easy to get into XIV and scale it fast as you need it. You’ll probably also encounter some other new go-to-market strategies for storage.

As far as getting to the cloud, IBM has been dropping billions to build out about as complete a cloud stack as you can get.  SoftLayer, the key piece, was just the start. BlueMix, an implementation of IBM’s Open Cloud Architecture, leverages Cloud Foundry to enable developers to rapidly build, deploy, and manage their cloud applications while tapping a growing ecosystem of available services and runtime frameworks, many of which are open source. IBM will provide services and runtimes into the ecosystem based on its already extensive and rapidly expanding software portfolio. BlueMix is the IBM PaaS offering that compliments SoftLayer, its IaaS offering. Cloudant, the most recent acquisition, brings database as a service (DBaaS) to the stack. And don’t forget IBM Wave for z/VM, which virtualizes and manages Linux VMs, a critical cloud operation for sure. With this conglomeration of capabilities IBM is poised to offer something cloud-like to just about any organization. Plus, tying WebSphere and its other middleware products to SoftLayer bolsters the cloud stack that much more.

And don’t think IBM is going to stop here. DancingDinosaur expects to see more acquisitions, particularly when it comes to hybrid clouds and what IBM calls systems of engagement. Hybrid clouds, for IBM, link systems of engagement—built on mobile and social technologies where consumers are engaging with organizations—with systems of record, the main workloads of the System z and Power Systems, where data and transactions are processed.

DancingDinosaur intends to be at Edge 2014 where it expects to see IBM detailing a lot of its new infrastructure and demonstrating how to use it. You can register for Edge 2014 here until April 20 and grab a discount.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 675 other followers

%d bloggers like this: