Posts Tagged ‘z/OS’

System z Software Pricing at IBM Enterprise 2014

September 17, 2014

DancingDinosaur must have sat through more of David Chase’s presentations on System z software pricing than anyone who doesn’t actually buy System z software. And still it seems impossibly complicated.  The problem is the many different and changing circumstances under which a mainframe shop will use its System z. It speaks to IBM’s willingness to try to accommodate almost any use case for the mainframe while trying to be fair and still make a buck.

The last time DancingDinosaur wrote on mainframe software pricing it looked at IBM’s z/OS discounts for mobile transactions. It generated considerable interest. Well, there is more on mainframe software pricing at IBM Enterprise2014, Oct. 6-10 in Las Vegas. If you are paying workload pricing, you will want to check out these sessions:

IBM System z Software Pricing Overview by David Chase, who has spoken on this at numerous conferences and manages to make it understandable. This session introduces the software pricing options available for IBM’s zEnterprise and System z servers. It covers a variety of Monthly License Charge (MLC) metrics, including the newest ones: Advanced Workload License Charge (AWLC) and Advanced Entry Workload License Charge (AEWLC). It also introduces the IPLA “one-time charge” pricing and how it differs from MLC. Although the primary focus is on z/OS pricing, these pricing concepts also apply to z/VSE and z/TPF. If your organization is not taking advantage of these programs, you probably are over-paying for mainframe software.

Introduction to Sub-Capacity Pricing and Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool, again by David Chase. If your shop decides to adopt sub-capacity pricing for System z software, use of the Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool (SCRT) will be required whether you run z/OS, z/VSE and/or z/TPF. Attend this session to understand what the SCRT is, how it works, how to use it and how to interpret the output of the tool, the Sub-Capacity Report. This session also covers the planning steps for successful implementation of SCRT and discusses the end-to-end implementation process of collecting the required SMF data, running SCRT, reviewing the reports, and submitting them to IBM.

IBM System z Sub-Capacity and the SCRT Report by David Chase, of course. This session goes a step beyond the session above. Sub-capacity pricing for System z software is the way most customers achieve the optimal price performance available to them. But this means that the way your system is configured and used is very likely to have an impact upon the software charges you pay, and use of the Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool (SCRT) will be required. Attend this session to understand how SCRT works beyond the introductory level, how to use it, how to interpret the output of the tool (the Sub-Capacity Report), and most importantly, what options you have to tune your system to influence your monthly software charges.  

Software Licensing for Distributed Linux Middleware on IBM System z by David Chase, clearly the public face of IBM pricing. Many people understand how sub-capacity software licensing works for z/OS and z/VSE. Less well known—IBM also offers sub-capacity licensing for distributed Linux middleware when it runs on System z. Attend this session to understand how the Passport Advantage virtualization and sub-capacity licensing rules work in a Linux on System z environment, especially when you are using IFL engines running under the control of z/VM.

Mainframe software licensing is maddening and has little to do with what attracts people to enterprise computing. As a result, mainframe people stay away from it, leaving it to lawyers and the folks in purchasing, who may be even less prepared to tackle the subject than you. Big mistake. Once you are aware of how it works you can arrange workloads to ensure the lowest price. BTW, if you bring in a name brand consultant for advice on reducing mainframe data center costs, the first thing they check are your software invoices. Skip the consultant; bring your questions to David Chase’s sessions at Enterprise 2014. It will pay for your trip.

Also, don’t miss three evenings of live performances: 2 country rock groups, Delta Rae and The Wild Feathers and then, Rock of Ages. Check out all three and more here

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Look for me at Enterprise2014. You can follow this blog and more on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Find Alan Radding on Technologywriter.com.

IBM-Apple Deal Enhanced by New z/OS Pricing Discounts

July 25, 2014

In the spring, IBM announced, almost as an aside, new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile transactions. At the time, it didn’t seem like a big deal. But IBM’s more recent announcement of its exclusive mobile partnership with Apple, covered by DancingDinosaur here, suddenly gives it much bigger potential.

The plan is to create apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad, allowing companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction. At the backend will be the mainframe.

Already zEnterprise shops, especially banks and financial services firms, are reporting growth in the volume of transactions that originate from mobile devices. The volume of these mobile-originated transactions in some cases is getting large enough to impact the four-hour peak loads that are used in calculating monthly costs.

Here’s the problem: you put out a mobile app and want people to use it. They do, but much of the workload being generated does not directly produce revenue. Rather, they are requesting data or checking invoices and balances. Kind of a bummer to drive up monthly charges with non-revenue producing work.

That’s where the new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile workloads come in. The new pricing reduces the impact of these mobile transactions on reported LPAR MSUs. Specifically, the Mobile Workload Pricing Reporting Tool (MWRT) will subtract 60% of the reported Mobile MSUs from a given LPAR in each hour, adjusting the total LPAR MSU value for that hour. Think of this as just a standard SCRT report with a discount built in to adjust for mobile workload impact.

So, what does that translate into in terms of hard dollar savings? DancingDinosaur had a private briefing with two IBMers who helped build the tool and asked that question. They are only in the earliest stages of getting actual numbers from users in the field; the tool only became available June 30.  Clearly the results depend on how many mobile transactions you are handling in each reporting hour and how you are handling the workloads.

There is a little work involved but the process won’t seem intimidating to mainframe shops accustomed to IBM’s monthly reporting process. Simply record mobile program transaction data, including CPU seconds, on an hourly basis per LPAR, load the resulting data file into the new tool, MWRT, each month using the IBM-specified CSV format, and run MWRT, submitting the results to IBM each month. It replaces the SCRT process.

The MWRT will function like a partial off-load from a software pricing perspective. When an LPAR value is adjusted, all software running in the LPAR will benefit from lower MSUs. The tool will calculate the monthly MSU peak for a given machine using the adjusted MSU values.

This brings us back to the hard dollar savings question. The answer: probably not much initially unless your mobile apps already generate a sizeable proportion of your peak transaction volume. But jump ahead six months or a year when the IBM-Apple partnership’s new iOS made-for-business apps are gaining traction your mobile transaction volume could be climbing substantially each month. At that point, savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars or more seem quite possible.

Of course, the new applications or the entire partnership could be a bust. In that case, you will have burned some admin time for a one-time set up. You’ll still experience whatever normal transaction growth your current mobile apps generate and collect your discounted MSU charges. Unless the big IT analysis firms are dead wrong, however, mobile transactions are not going away. To the contrary, they will only increase. The bottom line: negligible downside risk while the upside gain could be huge.

Hope to see you at IBM Enterprise 2014 in Las Vegas, Oct. 6-10. DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog and at Technologywriter.com

 

 

2014 to be Landmark Year for the Mainframe

February 10, 2014

The official announcement is still a few weeks away and the big event won’t take place until April, but the Internet is full of items about the 50th anniversary of the mainframe. Check some out here, here, and here.

In 1991 InfoWorld editor Stewart Alsop, predicted that on March 15, 1996 an InfoWorld reader would unplug the last mainframe.  Alsop wrote many brilliant things about computing over the years, but this statement will forever stand out as one of the least informed, as subsequent events amply demonstrated.  That statement, however, later became part of the inspiration for the name of this blog, DancingDinosaur. The mainframe did not march inexorably to extinction like the dinosaur as many, many pundits predicted.

It might have, but IBM made some smart moves over the years that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance for years to come.  DancingDinosaur marks 2000 as a key year in the ongoing relevance of the mainframe; that was the year IBM got serious about Linux on the System z. It was not clear then that Linux would become the widely accepted mainstream operating system it is today.  Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed.  There is no question that Linux on the System z has become mainstream.

But it wasn’t Linux alone that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance. Java enables the development of distributed type of workloads on the System z, which is only further advanced by WebSphere on z, and SOA on z. Today’s hottest trends—cloud, big data/analytics, mobile, and social—can be handled on the z too: cloud computing on z, big data/analytics/real-time analytics on z, mobile computing on z, and even social on z.

Finally, there is the Internet of things. This is a natural for the System z., especially if you combine it with MQTT, an open source transport protocol that enables minimized pub/sub messaging across mobile networks. With the z you probably will also want to combine it with the Really Small Message Broker (RSMB). Anyway, this will be the subject of an upcoming DancingDinosaur piece.

The net net:  anything you can do on a distributed system you can do on the System z and benefit from better resiliency and security built in. Even when it comes to cost, particularly TCO and cost per workload, between IBM’s deeply discounted System z Solution Editions and the introduction of the zBC12, which delivers twice the entry capacity for the same low cost ($75k) as the previous entry-level machine (z114), the mainframe is competitive.

Also coming up is Edge 2014, which focuses on Infrastructure Innovation this year. Please plan to attend, May 19-23 in Las Vegas.  Previous Edge conferences were worthwhile and this should be equally so. Watch DancingDinosaur for more details on the specific Edge programs.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

Meet the Power 795—the RISC Mainframe

December 16, 2013

The IBM POWER 795 could be considered a RISC mainframe. A deep dive session on the Power 795 at Enterprise 2013 in early October presented by Patrick O’Rourke didn’t call the machine a mainframe. But when he walked attendees through the specifications, features, capabilities, architecture, and design of the machine it certainly looked like what amounted to a RISC mainframe.

Start with the latest enhancements to the POWER7 chip:

  • Eight processor cores with:

12 execution units per core

4 Way SMT per core – up to 4 threads per core

32 Threads per chip

L1: 32 KB I Cache / 32 KB D Cache

 L2: 256 KB per core

 L3: Shared 32MB on chip eDRAM

  • Dual DDR3 Memory Controllers

100 GB/s Memory bandwidth per chip

  • Scalability up to 32 Sockets

360 GB/s SMP bandwidth/chip

20,000 coherent operations in flight

Built on POWER7 and slated to be upgraded to POWER8 by the end of 2014 the Power 795 boasts a number of new features:

  • New Memory Options
  • New 64GB DIMM enable up to 16TB of memory
  • New hybrid I/O adapters will deliver Gen2 I/O connections
  • No-charge Elastic processor and memory days
  • PowerVM will enable up an 20 LPARs per core

And running at 4.2 GHz, the Power 795 clock speed starts to approach the zEC12 at 5.5 GHz while matching the clock speed of the zBC12.

IBM has also built increased flexibility into the Power 795, starting with turbo mode which allows users to turn on and off cores as they manage power consumption and performance. IBM also has enhanced the concept of Power pools, which allows users to group systems into compute clusters by setting up and moving processor and memory activations within a defined pool of systems, at the user’s convenience. With the Power 795 pool activations can be moved at any time by the user without contacting IBM, and the movement of the activations is instant, dynamic, and non-disruptive. Finally, there is no limit to the number of times activations can be moved. Enterprise pools can include the Power 795, 780, and 770 and systems with different clock speeds can coexist in the same pool. The activation assignment and movement is controlled by the HMC, which also determines the maximum number of system in any given pool.

The Power 795 provides three flavors of capacity of demand (CoD). One flavor for organizations that know they will need the extra capacity that can be turned on through easy activation over time. Another is intended for organizations that know they will need extra capacity at predictable times, such as the end of the quarter, and want to pay for the added capacity on a daily basis. Finally, there is a flavor for organizations that experience unpredictable short bursts of activity and prefer to pay for the additional capacity by the minute. Actually, there are more than the three basic flavors of CoD above but these three will cover the needs of most organizations.

And like a mainframe, the Power 795 comes with extensive hardware redundancy.  OK, the Power 795 isn’t a mainframe. It doesn’t run z/OS and it doesn’t do hybrid computing. But if you don’t run z/OS workloads and you’re not planning on running hybrid workloads yet still want the scalability, flexibility, reliability, and performance of a System z the Power 795 might prove very interesting indeed. And when the POWER8 processor is added to the mix the performance should go off the charts. This is a worthy candidate for enterprise systems consolidation.

Latest in System z Software Pricing—Value Unit Edition

December 5, 2013

Some question how sensitive IBM is to System z costs and pricing.  Those that attended any of David Chase’s several briefings on System z software pricing at Enterprise 2013 this past October, however would realize the convulsions the organization goes through for even what seems like the most trivial of pricing adjustments. So, it is not a small deal that IBM is introducing something called Value Unit Edition (VUE) pricing for System z software.

VUE began with DB2. The purpose is to give z data centers greater pricing flexibility while encouraging new workloads on the z. VUE specifically is aimed at key business initiatives such as SOA, Web-based applications, pureXML, data warehousing and operational business intelligence (BI), and commercial (packaged) applications such as SAP, PeopleSoft, and Siebel. What started as a DB2 initiative has now been extended to WebSphere MQ, CICS, and IMS workloads.

In short, VUE pricing gives you a second pricing option for eligible (meaning new) z workloads. BTW, this eligibility requirement isn’t unusual with the z; it applies to the System z Solution Edition deals too. Specifically, VUE allows you to opt to pay for the particular software as a one-time capital expenditure (CAPEX) in the form of a one-time charge (OTC) rather than as a monthly license charge (MLC), which falls into the OPEX category.

Depending on your organization’s particular circumstances the VUE option could be very helpful. Whether it is more advantageous for you, however, to opt for OTC or MLC with any eligible workload is a question only your corporate accountant can answer (and one, hopefully, that is savvy about System z software pricing overall).  This is not something z data center managers are likely to answer on their own.

Either way you go, IBM in general has set the pricing to be cost neutral with a five-year breakeven. Under some circumstances you can realize discounts around the operating systems; in those cases you may do better than a five-year breakeven. But mainly this is more about how you pay, not how much you pay. VUE pricing is available for every System z model, even older ones. Software running under VUE will have to run in its own LPAR so IBM can check its activity as it does with other software under SCRT.

In summary, the main points of VUE are:

  • One-time-charge (OTC) pricing option across key middleware and packaged applications
  • The ability to consolidate or grow new workloads without increasing operational expense
  • Deployment on a z New Application License Charge (zNALC) LPAR, which, as expected, runs under the zNALC terms and conditions
  • Of course, new applications must be qualified; it really has to be new
  • Allows a reduced price for the z/OS operating system
  • Runs as a mixed environment, some software MLC  some OTC
  • Selected ISV offerings qualify for VUE

Overall, System z software pricing can be quite baffling. There is nothing really comparable in the distributed world. The biggest benefit of VUE comes from the flexibility it allows, OPEX or CAPEX, not from not from any small discount on z/OS. Given the set of key software and middleware VUE applies to the real opportunity lies in using its availability to take bring on new projects that expand the footprint of the z in your organization. As DancingDinosaur has pointed out before, the more workloads you run on the z the lower your cost-per-workload.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

zEnterprise Back to the Future— 3270 Mainframe Computing

August 30, 2013

Remember 3270 computing? Those were the pervasive green screen terminals that connected to the mainframe. The user would tab his or her way through seemingly endless screens to get anything done? At IBMer Frank DeGillio’s presentation on mobile and the mainframe during the recent SHARE conference in Boston this image popped up.

3270 terminal

3270 terminal

DancingDinosaur hasn’t seen one of these in years. It was the last slide in DeGillio’s deck for his session titled Mobile and the Mainframe. He covered mobile, cloud, VDI, and, suddenly, this!

DeGillio wasn’t actually advocating for a return to 3270 computing.  Rather he was describing the evolving reality of mobile, cloud, and VDI.  You end up with smart devices—mobile phones and tablets—that are configured with terrific compute, memory, communications, and display capabilities. Yet for all their capabilities, there still needs to be something else. And that is the enterprise’s data and business logic. Often that resides on distributed systems, which are quickly becoming latest legacy systems.

Especially at large enterprises, which may be supporting thousands of smart mobile devices, the data and business logic more often than not lies with the mainframe. No problem; the mainframe data center knows how to handle security, availability, and scalability for tens of thousands of concurrent users. This is what mainframe data centers have done going all the way back to the 3270 days and before.

When you come down to it, the 3270 device connected to the mainframe, wasn’t that much different from today’s smart devices needing to connect to the data and business logic residing in the data center. Sure, they have compelling displays and nifty features like swipe and tap or GPS and media but they still need the enterprise business logic and data.

Combine the profusion of smart mobile devices thanks to BYOD with VDI running on the hybrid zEnterprise to serve up their Windows office productivity applications along with business applications, business logic and enterprise data at massive scale to create what resembles a 3270 system on steroids.

This is not ready for prime time today, but with some of IBM’s recent statements of direction, it may be soon.  For example, IBM intends to provide additional platform support for z/OS to an updated Worklight, its primary mobile development and deployment tool.  The company anticipates extending Worklight support to both IBM System z hardware and the z/OS operating system in the future.

As for CICS, which would have to be play a key role, IBM intends, according to a recent statement of direction, to deliver enhanced support for mobile applications interacting with IBM CICS Transaction Server for z/OS (CICS TS) services, using the lightweight data-interchange format JavaScript Object Notation (JSON).  IBM also intends to introduce support for deploying qualified new CICS TS workloads on IBM zNALC logical partitions (LPARs). Qualified new CICS TS applications, including approved mobile and service-enabled applications running in the CICS TS Java Virtual Machine (JVM) Server, will be eligible for CICS TS one-time-charge (OTC) pricing when deployed to a zNALC LPAR.

“We’re going back to the 3270 world,” suggested DeGillio. Well, not exactly and not immediately.  But when the industry does move that way, the mainframe data center can take over much of the heavy lifting and use its mainframe scale and expertise to lower the cost, deliver performance, and manage resources.

Cloud and distributed people can’t do this nearly as well, DeGillio continued. “Cloud people need to start a server when they want to do something else. They don’t understand isolation and scale; they don’t understand how to run VDI to z/OS on the same platform.” But mainframe data center managers do, and that’s what it will take to lower enterprise mobile computing costs and make it work at scale.

Don’t start dusting off those 3270 terminals just yet.  You can, however, start thinking about tuning your 3270 processes and procedures for use with this new generation of connected smart mobile terminals.

One place you probably won’t find 3270 terminals will be at IBM’s upcoming Enterprise 2013 conference in Orlando, Oct. 21-25. This combines the System z and Power Systems Technical University with an Executive Summit on enterprise class systems. Dancing Dinosaur expects to be there, hoping to learn, among other things, more details of the POWER 8 processor, which IBM has just started revealing publicly. It is not too early to start planning to come.

New zEnterprise Business Class Entry Model—zBC12

July 23, 2013

IBM introduced its new zEnterprise Business Class machine, the equivalent of the z114 for the zEC12, the zEnterprise BC12 (zBC12).  It offers significantly more power than its predecessor but the $75,000 base price hasn’t changed.

The company has been hinting at the arrival of this machine for months (and DancingDinosaur has been passing along those hints as quickly as they came). Of particular interest is that the System z Solution Edition pricing applies to the zBC12. Solution Edition pricing should make the machine quite competitive with x86-based systems, especially when running multiple Linux instances.

IBM isn’t being coy about its intentions to discount this machine. The initial announcement touted a new Linux-only based version of the zBC12, the Enterprise Linux Server (ELS). The ELS includes hardware, the z/VM Hypervisor, and three years of maintenance at a deeply discounted price. Besides over 3,000 Linux applications it includes two new capabilities, ELS for Analytics and Cloud-Ready for Linux on System z, each acting as an onramp for analytics or cloud computing.

DancingDinosaur has been a big fan of the Solution Edition program as the only way to get serious discounts on a mainframe. The big caveat is the constraints IBM puts on the use of the discounted machine. Each Solution Edition program is negotiated so just make sure you fully understand the constraints and all the fine print so you can live with it for several years. Of course, a zBC12 can be used for anything you would use a mainframe although enterprise Linux serving seems  an ideal use.

Besides its faster processor the zBC12 also offers up 156 capacity settings on each model  to choose just the right capacity setting for your needs along with a new pay-as-you-grow approach. When it is integrated with the IBM DB2 Analytics Accelerator, the zBC12 can perform business analytics workloads with10x better price performance and 14 percent lower total cost of acquisition than the closest competitor, according to IBM.

Out of the box the zBC12 specs look good:

  • 4.2 GHz processor designed to deliver up to a 36% performance increase per core to help boost software performance for business-critical workloads
  • Up to six general purpose processors designed to deliver up to 58% more capacity compared to the z114, which had five general purpose processors
  • Up to a 2x increase in available memory (496 GB) compared to the z114 for improved performance of memory-demanding workloads such as DB2, IBM WebSphere, and Linux on System z

The zBC12 comes in two models, the H06 and H13. Both are air cooled, single frame, or support 30 LPARS. The H06 has one processor drawer for 9 processor units. These can be divided between SAPs, CPs, IFLs/ICFs, zIIPs and zAAPs, and 1 IFP.  The Model H113 has two processor drawers to handle 18 processor units. It allows the same mix of processor types but in larger quantities and 2 dedicated spares. There are configurations where the H06 requires the second processor drawer. The entry processing level is 50 MIPS, up from 26 MIPS with the z114 with no change in the base price.

As far as other pricing, the zBC12 follows essentially an extension of the z114 stack pricing with a 27% price/performance improvement over the z114 for specialty engine pricing, which translates in 36% greater performance for the money.  Pricing for maintenance remains the same. Software keeps with the same pricing curve with a 5% discount applied. The price of Flash Express for the zBC12 remains at $125,000.

IBM has provided a straightforward upgrade path from the z10 or zEnterprise to the zBC12 as well as from the zBC12 to the zEC12. It also can be connected to the zBX (Model 003) to seamlessly manage workloads across a hybrid computing environment consisting of multiple architectures (Linux, AIX, and Intel/Windows).

The announcement of the zBC12 was accompanied by a slew of other new z announcements, including the new IBM zEnterprise Analytics System 9710,and native JSON support to bridge the gap between mobile devices and enterprise data and services along with conversion between JSON  and the new CICS Transaction Server Feature Pack for Mobile Extensions V1.0 and DB2 11 for z/OS (ESP).  Plus there is the new z/VM v6.3 and enhancements to the z/OS Management Facility.

As DancingDinosaur noted last week, expect z sales to get a boost in the next quarter or two as organizations choose the new zBC12. With its improved price/performance and low entry pricing and the Solution Edition deal for the zBC12 ELS the z should see a nice bounce.

zEnterprise Workload Economics

February 21, 2013

IBM never claims that every workload is suitable for the zEnterprise. However, with the advent of hybrid computing, the low cost z114, and now the expected low cost version of the zEC12 later this year you could make a case for any workload that benefits from the reliability, security, and efficiency of the z is fair game.

John Shedletsky, VP, IBM Competitive Project Office, did not try to make that case. To the contrary, earlier this week he presented the business case for five workloads that are optimum economically and technically on the zEnterprise.  They are:  transaction processing, critical data workloads, batch processing, co-located business analytics, and consolidation-on-one-platform. None of these should be a surprise; possibly with the exception of analytics and consolidated platform they represent traditional mainframe workloads. DancingDinosaur covered Shedletsky’s z cost/workload analysis last year here.

This comes at a time when IBM has started making a lot of noise about new and different workloads on the zEnterprise. Doug Balog, head of IBM System z mainframe group, for example, was quoted widely in the press earlier this month talking about bringing mobile computing workloads to the z. Says Balog in Midsize Insider: “I see there’s a trend in the market we haven’t directly connected to z yet, and that’s this mobile-social platform.”

Actually, this isn’t even all that new either. DancingDinosaur was writing about organizations using SOA to connect CICS apps running on the z to users with mobile devices a few years ago here.

What Shedletsky really demonstrated this week was the cost-efficiency of the zEC12.  In one example he compared a single workload, app production/dev/test running on a 16x, 32-way HP Superdome and an 8x, 48-way Superdome with a zEC12 41-way. The zEC12 delivered the best price/performance by far, $111 million (5yr TCA) for the zEC12 vs. $176 million (5yr TCA) for the two Superdomes.

When running Linux on z workloads with the zEC12 compared to 3 Oracle database workloads (Oracle Enterprise Edition, Oracle RAC, 4 server nodes per cluster) supporting 18K transactions/sec.  running on 12 HP DL580 servers (192 cores) the HP system priced out at $13.2 million (3yr TCA). That compared to a zEC12 running 3 Oracle RAC clusters (4 nodes per cluster, each as a Linux guest) with 27 IFLs, which priced out at $5.7 million (3yr TCA). The zEC12 came in at less than half the cost.

With analytics such a hot topic these days Shedletsky also presented a comparison of the zEnterprise Analytics System 9700 (zEC12, DB2 v10, z/OS, 1 general processor, 1 zIIP) and an IDAA with a current Teradata machine. The result: the Teradata cost $330K/queries per hour compared to $10K/queries per hour.  Workload time for the Teradata was 1,591 seconds for 9.05 queries per hour. That compared to 60.98 seconds and 236 queries per hour on the zEC12. The Teradata total cost was $2.9 million versus $2.3 million for the zEC12.

None of these are what you would consider new workloads, and Shedletsky has yet to apply his cost analysis to mobile or social business workloads. However, the results shouldn’t be much different. Mobile applications, particularly mobile banking and other mobile transaction-oriented applications, will play right into the zEC12 strengths, especially when they are accessing CICS on the back end.

While transaction processing, critical data workloads, batch processing, co-located business analytics, and consolidation-on-one-platform remain the sweet spot for the zEC12, Balog can continue to make his case for mobile and social business on the z. Maybe in the next set of Shedletsky comparative analyses we’ll see some of those workloads come up.

For social business the use cases aren’t quite clear yet. One use case that is emerging, however, is social business big data analytics. Now you can apply the zEC12 to the analytics processing part at least and the efficiencies should be similar.

New Announcements Fuel zEnterprise Rebound

February 6, 2013

A couple of weeks ago DancingDinosaur looked at the year-end results posted by IBM, with the z, led by the zEC12, leading the gains. Despite some tough quarters earlier in 2012, the System z has been on quite a roll; in 4Q12  it experienced 56% year to year revenue growth, the strongest since 2000.

The numbers look that much when better compared to what had immediately preceded them. In 3Q12, the z was down 19% on revenue (ouch).

The financials prove what long-time IBM watchers know: a new mainframe intro always kicks up the numbers, although it may take a quarter or two. The new machine, the zEC12, launched at the end of August 2012. Historically IBM follows a new mainframe with a business class version about a year after the initial launch, so we can expect a business class version of the zEC12 around August or September. (The z114 was introduced in July 2011, a year after the z196.) You can expect IBM will price it aggressively, as was the z114.

But it wasn’t only the new machine driving the good number.  Since the introduction of hybrid computing in 2010 with the zEnterprise 196, IBM has been doggedly pushing the idea of cloud computing, analytics (big data or otherwise), efficient centralized management, elastic scalability, and mobility. It has steadily brought out tools and optimizations that enhance the z for these kinds of workloads. Today its three main growth initiatives for the z focus on cloud, analytics, and security, which parallel IBM’s overall Smarter Computing thrust.

Optimizations and enhancements, like those announced or previewed earlier this week, will continue to drive the zEnterprise forward. For example, newly enhanced tools like z/OSMF (z/OS Management Facility) ease management of z/OS through a modern, browser-based console for z/OS.

The newest version, z/OSMF Version 2.1, previewed this week, provides intuitive management intended to enable IBM’s Smarter Computing through such capabilities as at-a-glance reports on software service levels and system software assets. New workflow capabilities promise to simplify z/OS configuration tasks and tune them to user roles. It leverages the Liberty profile for WebSphere for z/OS to accelerate deployment and speed time to value. Finally, it includes a REST API for jobs submission, which bridges batch and web-based applications and, in the process, helps bring younger z/OS system programmers up to speed.

Eletrobras Electronuclear, Brazil, the largest generator of electricity in Latin America, turned to z/OSMF for help in cloning its production system to ensure system resilience. As an Eletrobras manager noted: With z/OSMF this cloning process is much easier and can be completed in a matter of a few hours.

Also previewed was z/OS Version 2.1, described by IBM as the Smart Foundation for Smart Computing. z/OS v2.1 brings enhanced security through a new crypto server and support for additional industry security standards.  Enhancements around paging and throughput enable greater scalability while providing optimized performance reporting.  It offers enhanced data serving to fuel analytics for new data-hungry analytic applications as well as optimized data storage and faster file retrieval through an enhanced zFS along with improved FICON management. For management, it includes built in workload optimization, extended management reporting, and continued batch modernization.

IBM also previewed a z/VM upgrade, version 6.3. This adds support for 1TB of real memory and improved performance with HiperDispatch. The z/VM memory will provide better performance for larger virtual machines and reduced LPAR sprawl by allowing up to 4x more VMs per LPAR.  z/VM v6.3 boasts a higher server consolidation ratio with support for more virtual servers than any other platform in a single footprint, according to IBM.

Meanwhile IBM continues to roll out z customer examples at an increasing pace. Bankia, a Spanish banking company, turned to the System z for real-time integration of data to facilitate monitoring and mitigate risk. Vantiv, a leading payment processor based in Cincinnati, turned to the z for its cryptographic coprocessors to secure 2 billion transactions per month.

Marriott, an early zEC12 adopter, uses the machine to centralize its reservations and streamline the selling of rooms through elastic pricing. The University of Florida turned to the z for a scalable and reliable IT infrastructure that could accommodate students accessing and interacting with applications and data through mobile applications.

Already 2013 promises to be an interesting year for z shops. Expect more innovation, optimization, and a new low cost business class machine to accompany the zEC12.

System z Clouds Pay Off

January 9, 2013

From its introduction last August, IBM has aimed the zEC12 at cloud use cases, especially private clouds. The zEC12’s massive virtualization capabilities make it possible to handle private cloud environments consisting of thousands of distributed systems running Linux on zEC12.

One zEC12, notes IBM, can encompass the capacity of an entire multi-platform data center in a single system. The newest z also enables organizations to run conventional IT workloads and private cloud applications on one system.  If you are looking at a zEC12 coupled with the zBX you can have a hybrid private cloud running Linux, Windows, and AIX workloads.

There are three main reasons why z-based data centers should consider a private cloud:

  1. The z does it so naturally and seamlessly
  2. It boosts IT efficiency, mainly through user self service
  3. It increases enterprise agility, especially when it comes to provisioning and deploying IT resources and applications fast

Organizations everywhere are adopting private clouds (probably because C-level execs are more comfortable with private cloud security).  The Open Data Center Alliance reports faster private cloud adoption than originally predicted. Over half its survey respondents will be running more than 40% of their IT operations in private clouds by 2015.

Mainframes make a particularly good private cloud choice. Nationwide, the insurance company, consolidated 3000 distributed servers to Linux virtual servers running on a variety of z mainframes, creating a multi-platform private mainframe cloud optimized for its different workloads. The goal was to improve efficiency.

Nationwide initially intended to isolate its Linux and z/OS workloads on different physical mainframes. This resulted in a total of seven machines – a mixture of z9 and z10 servers – of which two were dedicated to Linux. To optimize this footprint, however, Nationwide ended up consolidating all workloads to four IBM zEnterprise 196 servers and two z10 servers, putting Linux and z/OS workloads on the same machines because its confidence level with Linux on the mainframe and the maturity of the platform made the Nationwide IT team comfortable mixing workloads.

The key benefit of this approach was higher utilization and better economies of scale, effectively making the mainframes into a unified private cloud—a single set of resources, managed with the same tools but optimized for a variety of workloads. The payback:  elimination of both capital and operational expenditures, expected to save about $15 million over three years. The more compact and efficient zEnterprise landscape also means low costs in the future. Specifically, Nationwide is realizing an 80% reduction in power, cooling and floor space despite an application workload that is growing 30% annually, and practically all of it handled through the provisioning of new virtual servers on the existing mainframe footprint.

Another z cloud was built by the City and County of Honolulu. It needed to increase government transparency by providing useful, timely data to its citizens. The goal was to boost citizen involvement, improve delivery of services, and increase the efficiency of city operations.

Honolulu built its cloud using an IFL engine running Linux on the city’s z10 EC machine. Between Linux and IBM z/VM the city created a customized cloud environment. This provided a scalable self-service platform on which city employees could develop open source applications, and it empowered the general public to create and deploy citizen-centric applications. Other components included IBM XIV storage, IBM Maximo Asset Management, IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON, Tivoli Workload Scheduler, and Tivoli Storage Manager.

The results: reduction in application deployment time from one week to only hours, 68% lower licensing costs for one database, and a new property tax appraisal system that increased tax revenue by $1.4 million in just three months.

There are even more examples of z clouds. For z shops a private cloud should be pretty straightforward; you’re probably over half-way there already. All you need are a few more components and a well-defined business case.  Give me a call, and I’ll even help you pull the business case together.


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