A Maturity Model for the New Mainframe Normal

Last week Compuware introduced its new mainframe maturity model designed to address what is emerging as the new mainframe normal. DancingDinosaur played a central role in the creation of this model.

A new mainframe maturity model is needed because the world of the mainframe is changing rapidly.  Did your data center team ever think they would be processing mainframe transactions from mobile phones? Your development team probably never imagined they would be architecting compound workloads across the mainframe and multiple distributed systems running both Windows and Linux? What about the prospect of your mainframe serving up millions or even billions of customer-facing transactions a day?  But that’s the mainframe story today.

Even IBM, the most stalwart of the mainframe vendors, repeats the driving trends—cloud, mobile, social, big data, analytics, Internet of things—like a mantra. As the mainframe celebrates its 50th anniversary year, it is fitting that a new maturity model be introduced because there is, indeed, a new mainframe normal rapidly evolving.

Things certainly are changing in ways most mainframe data center managers wouldn’t have anticipated 10 years ago, probably not even five years ago. Of those, perhaps the most disconcerting change for traditional mainframe shops is the need to accommodate distributed, open systems (systems of engagement) alongside the traditional mainframe environment (systems of record).

Since the rise of distributed systems two decades ago, there has existed both a technical and cultural gap between the mainframe and distributed teams. The emergence of technologies like hybrid computing, middleware, and the cloud have gone far to alleviate the technical gap. The cultural gap is not so amenable to immediate fixes. Still, navigating that divide is no longer optional – it has become a business imperative.  Crossing the gap is what the new maturity model addresses.

Many factors contribute to the gap; the largest of which appears to be that most organizations still approach the mainframe and distributed environments as separate worlds. One large financial company, for example, recently reported that they view the mainframe as simply MQ messages to distributed developers.

The new mainframe maturity model can be used as a guide to bridging both the technical and cultural gaps.  Specifically, the new model defines five levels of maturity. In the process, it incorporates distributed systems alongside the mainframe and recognizes the new workloads, processes and challenges that will be encountered. The five levels are:

  1. Ad-hoc:  The mainframe runs core systems and applications; these represent the traditional mainframe workloads and the green-screen approach to mainframe computing.
  2. Technology-centric:  An advanced mainframe is focused on ever-increasing volumes, higher capacity, and complex workload and transaction processing while keeping a close watch on MIPS consumption.
  3. Internal services-centric:  The focus shifts to mainframe-based services through a service delivery approach that strives to meet internal service level agreements (SLAs).
  4. External services-centric:  Mainframe and non-mainframe systems interoperate through a services approach that encompasses end-user expectations and tracks external SLAs.
  5. Business revenue-centric:  Business needs and the end-user experience are addressed through interoperability with cloud and mobile systems, services- and API-driven interactions, and real-time analytics to support revenue initiatives revolving around complex, multi-platform workloads.

Complicating things is the fact that most IT organizations will likely find themselves straddling different maturity levels. For example, although many have achieved levels 4 and 5 when it comes to technology the IT culture remains at levels 1 or 2. Such disconnects mean IT still faces many obstacles preventing it from reaching optimal levels of service delivery and cost management. And this doesn’t just impact IT; there can be ramifications for the business itself, such as decreased customer satisfaction and slower revenue growth.

DancingDinosaur’s hope is that as the technical cultures come closer through technologies like Java, Linux, SOA, REST, hybrid computing, mobile, and such to allow organizations to begin to close the cultural gap too.

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2 Responses to “A Maturity Model for the New Mainframe Normal”

  1. El mainframe está preparado para la avalancha | youngmainframe Says:

    […] mainframe continua cambiando para dar soluciones a estos retos. Como apunta Alan Radding en su blog “Dancing dinosour”  el mainframe es capaz de asumir la avalancha que da lugar la movilidad, el cloud computing, el […]

  2. El mainframe está preparado para la avalancha | Roberto Ruiz Pérez Says:

    […] continuamente para dar soluciones a estos nuevos retos. Como apunta Alan Radding en su blog “Dancing dinosour”  el mainframe es capaz de asumir la avalancha que da lugar la movilidad, el cloud computing, el […]

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