IBM Edge2014 Explores Software Defined Everything in Depth

IBM Edge2014 is coming up fast, May 19-23 in Las Vegas, at the Venetian. Plus there is the Sheryl Crow concert you don’t want to miss.

IBM Edge2014 is bringing over 400 program sessions across more than a dozen topic tracks; choices for everyone from the geekiest techie to the most buttoned down business executive. One that crosses both camps—technical and business—is Software Defined Environments (SDE), which DancingDinosaur of thinks of as software-defined everything.

SDE takes the abstraction, or the decoupling, of software and hardware to the next level. It takes virtualization and moves it higher up in the stack.  There you can virtualize not only servers but network switches, storage, and more. The benefit: efficiency, speed, and flexibility. You can allocate and deploy system resources quickly and easily through software. And add or move capabilities as needed, again through software.

Through software defined virtualization the IT industry can virtualize nearly every resource and capability. If you can encapsulate a set of capabilities as software you have created a virtualized component that can run on almost any network-attached device capable of hosting software.  In short, you have effectively decoupled those capabilities usually embedded as firmware from whatever underlying physical device previously hosted them.

IBM Edge2014 offers numerous software defined sessions. Let’s look at a few:

Software Defined Storage – Storage for Software Defined Environments

Presented by Clodoaldo Barrera

As described in the program, Software Defined Environments (SDE) have become the preferred approach for modern IT operations, combining the values of automation, policy enforcement, and efficiency. Within these SDE operations, storage must be properly configured to support the expected user experience and cost benefits, while still providing performance, availability, and data protection. In this session Barrera will explain how storage is configured and then managed through a stack of virtualization, provisioning, and orchestration software.

IBM Software Defined Storage Vision and Roadmap

Presented by Vincent Hsu, Tom Clark

This session introduces the core technology for IBM Software Defined Storage (SDS) vision and the SDS product roadmap. This includes the control plane technology as well as the data plane technology to address the future software defined data center.

But it is not only about storage. IBM’s Strategy for Software Defined Networking

Presented by Andy Wright

Here Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging framework designed for virtual, dynamic and flexible networking that allows organizations to easily modify, control and manage physical and virtual networks. IBM already is a leader in this space with SDN VE offerings and the roadmap above tells you where it is headed. Wright’s session examines IBM’s Vision, Network Virtualization (Overlay) capabilities for existing networks, and the capabilities of OpenFlow networks. These technologies promise to improve the working lives of system, virtualization, cloud, and network administrators. If you fill one of these roles, you probably don’t want to miss this.

Continuity Requirements for Software Defined Data Centers

Presented by Jon Toigo

One the benefits of software defined resources is the ability to spin up additional resource virtually. That leads to the assumption of an agile and dynamic data center that can turn on a dime in response to business requirements. That is true in theory. Rarely discussed, however, are the inherent risks of combining physical and virtual resources, both locally deployed and sourced from remote cloud-based providers. This presentation will identify some disaster recovery and business continuity requirements to keep in mind as you plan your software defined data center and need to rein in management’s wishful thinking.

And a related topic, It’s All About the Object! IBM Customer Experiences with Object Storage

Presented by Manuel Avalos, Dan Lucky

Travis County in Austin, TX is an early adopter of IBM object storage. This case study positions IBM’s Statement Of Direction (SOD) about object storage based on OpenStack Swift. Here you can learn from six months of Travis County user experiences, values, and next steps.

And there is another entire session on SDE in the federal government. Overall, IBM Edge2014 is delivering considerable real world experiences direct from the user.

Look for DancingDinosaur at IBM Edge2014, Mon-Wed. at sessions or in the bloggers lounge.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

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