IBM Creates Comprehensive Cloud Security Portfolio

On Wednesday IBM introduced what it describes as the industry’s first intelligent security portfolio for protecting people, data, and applications in the cloud. Not a single product but a set of products that taps a wide range of IBM’s cloud security, analytics, and services offerings.  The portfolio dovetails with IBM’s end-to-end mainframe security solution as described at Enterprise2014 last month.

Cloud security certainly is needed. In a recent IBM CISO survey, 44% of security leaders said they expect a major cloud provider to suffer a significant security breach in the future; one that will drive a high percentage of customers to switch providers, not to mention the risks to their data and applications.  Cloud security fears have long been one of the biggest impediments to organizations moving more data, applications, and processes to the cloud. These fears are further complicated by the fact the IT managers feel that much their cloud providers do is beyond their control. An SLA only gets you so far.

2014 IBM study of CISO 44 high

The same survey found 86% of leaders surveyed say their organizations are now moving to cloud, of those three-fourths see their cloud security budget increasing over the next 3-5 years.

As is typical of IBM when it identifies an issue and feels it has an edge, the company assembles a structured portfolio of tools, a handful of which were offered Wednesday. The portfolio includes versions of IBM’s own tools optimized for the cloud and tools and technologies IBM has acquired.  Expect more cloud security tools to follow. Together the tools aim to manage access, protect data and applications, and enable visibility in the cloud.

For example, for access management IBM is bringing out Cloud Identity Services which  onboards and handles users through IBM-hosted infrastructure.  To safeguard access to cloud-deployed apps it is bringing a Cloud Sign-On service used with Bluemix. Through Cloud Sign-On developers can quickly add single-sign on to web and mobile apps via APIs.  Another product, Cloud Access Manager, works with SoftLayer to protect cloud applications with pattern-based security, multi-factor authentication, and context-based access control. IBM even has a tool to handle privileged users like DBAs and cloud admins, the Cloud Privilege Identity Manager.

Here is a run-down of what was announced Wednesday. Expect it to grow.

  • Cloud Identity Services—IBM Cloud Identity Services
  • Cloud Sign-On Service –IBM Single Sign On
  • Cloud Access Manager –IBM Security Access Manager
  • Cloud Privileged Identity Manager—IBM Security Privileged Identity Manager (v2.0)
  • Cloud Data Activity Monitoring—IBM InfoSphere Guardium Data Activity Monitoring
  • Cloud Mobile App Analyzer Service –IBM AppScan Mobile Analyzer
  • Cloud Web App Analyzer Service –IBM AppScan Dynamic Analyzer
  • Cloud Security Intelligence –IBM QRadar Security Intelligence (v7.2.4)
  • Cloud Security Managed Services –IBM Cloud Security Managed Services

Now let’s see how these map to what the z data center already can get with IBM’s End-to-End Security Solution for the Mainframe. For starters, security is built into every level of the System z structure: processor, hypervisor, operating system, communications, and storage.

In terms of security analytics; zSecure, Guardium, AppScan, and QRadar improve your security intelligence. Some of these tools are included in the new Cloud security portfolio. Intelligence is collected from z/OS, RACF, CA ACF2, CA Top Secret, CICS, and DB2. The zSecure suite also helps address compliance challenges. In addition, InfoSphere Guardium Real-time Activity Monitoring handles activity monitoring, blocking and masking, and vulnerability assessment.

Of course the z brings its crypto coprocessor, Crypto Express4S, which complements the cryptographic capabilities of CPACF. There also is a new zEC12 coprocessor, the EP11 processor, amounting to a Crypto Express adapter configured with the Enterprise PKCS #11 (EP11) firmware, also called the CEX4P adapter. It provides hardware-accelerated support for crypto operations that are based on RSA’s PKCS #11 Cryptographic Token Interface Standard. Finally, the z supports the necessary industry standards, like FIPS 140-2 Level 4, to ensure multi-tenanted public and private cloud workloads remain securely isolated. So the cloud, at least, is handled to some extent.

The mainframe has long been considered the gold standard for systems security. Now it is being asked to take on cloud-oriented and cloud-based workloads while delivering the same level of unassailable security. Between IBM’s end-to-end mainframe security solution and the new intelligent (analytics-driven) security portfolio for the cloud enterprise shops now have the tools to do the job right.

And you will want all those tools because security presents a complex, multi-dimensional puzzle requiring different layers of integrated defense. It involves not only people, data, applications, and infrastructure but also mobility, on premise and off premise, structured, unstructured, and big data. This used to be called defense in depth, but with the cloud and mobility the industry is moving far beyond that.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst with well over 20 years covering IT and the System z. You can find more of my writing at Technologywriter.com and here. Also follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

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