IBM Simplifies Internet of Things with developerWorks Recipes

IBM has a penchant for working through communities going back as far as Eclipse and probably before. Last week DancingDinosaur looked at the developerWorks Open community. Now let’s look at the IBM’s developerWorks Recipes community intended to address the Internet of Things (IoT).

recipes iot sensor tag

TI SensorTag

The Recipes community  will try to help developers – from novice to experienced – quickly and easily learn how to connect IoT devices to the cloud and how to use data coming from those connected devices. For example one receipe walks you through Connecting the TI Simplelink SensorTag (pictured above) to the IBM IoT foundation service in a few simple step. By following these steps a developer, according to IBM, should be able to connect the SensorTag to the IBM quickstart cloud service in less than 3 minutes. Think of recipes as simplified development patterns—so simple that almost anyone could follow it. (Wanted to try it myself but didn’t have a tag.  Still, it looked straightfoward enough.)

IoT is growing fast. Gartner forecasts 4.9 billion connected things in use in 2015, up 30% from 2014, and will reach 25 billion by 2020. In terms of revenue, this is huge. IDC predicts the worldwide IoT market to grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%. For IT people who figure out how to do this, the opportunity will be boundless. Every organization will want to connect its devices to other devices via IoT. The developerWorks Recipes community seems like a perfect way to get started.

IoT isn’t exactly new. Manufacturers have cobbled together machine-to-machine (M2M) networks Banks and retailers have assembled networks of ATMs and POS terminals. DancingDinosaur has been writing about IoT for mainframe shops for several years.  Now deveoperWorks Recipes promises a way for just about anyone to set up their own IoT easily and quickly while leveraging the cloud in the process. There is a handful of recipes now but it provides a mechanism to add recipes so expect the catalog of recipes to steadily increase. And developers are certain to take existing recipes and improvise on them.

IBM has been trying to simplify  development for cloud, mobile, IoT starting with the launch of Bluemix last year. By helping users connect their IoT devices to IBM Bluemix, which today boasts more than 100 open-source tools and services, users can then run advanced analytics, utilize machine learning, and tap into additional Bluemix services to accelerate the adoption of  IoT and more.

As easy as IBM makes IoT development sound this is a nascent effort industry wide. There is a crying need for standards at every level to facilitate the interoperability and data exchange among the many and disparate devices, networks, and applications that will make up IoT.  Multiple organizations have initiated standards efforts but it will take some time to sort it all out.

And then there is the question of security. In a widely reported experiment by Wired Magazine  hackers were able to gain control of a popular smart vehicle. Given that cars are expected to be a major medium for IoT and every manufacturer is rushing to jam as much smart componentry into their vehicles you can only hope every automaker is  scrambling for security solutions .

Home appliances represent another fat, lucrative market target for manufacturers that want to embed intelligent devices and IoT into their all products. What if hackers access your automatic garage door opener? Or worse yet, what if they turn off your coffee maker and water heater? Could you start the day without a hot shower and cup of freshly brewed coffee and still function?

Running IoT through secure clouds like the IBM Cloud is part of the solution. And industry-specific clouds intended for IoT already are being announced, much like the Internet exchanges of a decade or two ago. Still, more work needs to be done on security and interoperability standards if IoT is to work seamlessly and broadly to achieve the trillions of dollars of economic value projected for it.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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