IBM Power Systems LC Aims to Expand the Power Systems Market

IBM is rapidly trying to capitalize on its investment in POWER technology and the OpenPOWER Foundation to expand the POWER franchise. The company is offering up the  Power Systems LC Server family; LC for Linux Community. This addresses how processing will be used in the immediate future; specifically in Hybrid Cloud, Hyperscale Data Centers, and Open Solutions. You could probably throw in IoT and big data/real-time analytics too although those weren’t specifically mentioned in any of the LC announcement materials or briefings.

Linux Community 1 lc server

Courtesy of IBM:  the new Power S822LC (click to enlarge)

The LC Server family  comes with a new IBM go-to-market strategy, as IBM put it: buy servers the way you want to buy them; online with simple pricing and a one-click purchase (coming soon). Your choice of standard configurations or have your configuration customized to meet your unique needs through IBM’s global ecosystem of partners and providers. Same with a selection of service and support options from an array of IBM technology partners.

There appear to be three basic configurations at this point:

  1. Power Systems S812LC: designed for entry and small Hadoop workloads
  2. Power Systems S822LC for Commercial Computing: ideal for data in the cloud and flexible capacity for MSPs
  3. Power Systems S822LC for High Performance Computing: for cluster deployments across a broad range of industries

According to the latest S812LC spec sheet, the IBM 8348 Power System S812LC server with POWER8 processors is optimized for data and Linux. It is designed to deliver superior performance and throughput for high-value Linux workloads such as industry applications, open source, big data, and LAMP.  It incorporates OpenPOWER Foundation innovations for organizations that want the advantages of running their big data, Java, open source, and industry applications on a platform designed and optimized for data and Linux. Modular in design, the Power S812LC is simple to order and can scale from single racks to hundreds.

The Power S812LC server supports one processor socket, offering 8-core 3. 32 GHz or 10-core 2.92 GHz POWER8 configurations in a 19-inch rack-mount, 2U drawer configuration. All the cores are activated. The server provides 32 DIMM memory slots. Memory features supported are 4 GB (#EM5A), 8 GB (#EM5E), 16 GB (#EM5C), and 32 GB (#EM5D), allowing for a maximum system memory of 1024 GB.

The LC Server family will leverage a variety of innovations that have been brought out by various members of the OpenPOWER Foundation over the last few months.  These include innovations from Wistron, redislabs, Tyan, Nvidia, Mellanox, Ubuntu, and Nallatech in the areas of big data, GPU acceleration, HPC, and cloud. And, of course, IBM’s CAPI.

No actual pricing was provided. In response to a question from DancingDinosaur about whether the arrival of products from the OpenPOWER Foundation was driving down Power Systems prices, the response was a curt: “We haven’t seen the drag down,” said an IBM manager. Oh well, so much for an imminent price war over Power Systems.

However, IBM reported today that  based on its own internal testing, a new Power Systems LC server can complete an average of select Apache Spark workloads – including analyzing Twitter feeds, streaming web page views and other data-intensive analytics – for less than half the cost of an Intel E5-2699 V3 processor-based server, providing clients with 2.3x better performance per dollar spent. Additionally, the efficient design of a Power Systems LC server allows for 94% more Spark social media workloads in the same rack space as a comparable Intel-based server.

These new systems are exactly what is needed to make the POWER platform viable over the long term, and it can’t be just an IBM show. With OpenPOWER Foundation members delivering innovations there is no telling what can be done in terms of computing with POWER9 and POWER10 when they come.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

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