State of z System CICS in the Modern Enterprise

You should be very familiar with the figures describing the continued strength of mainframe computing in the enterprise today. Seventy percent of enterprise data resides on a mainframe, 71 percent of all Fortune 500 companies run their core businesses on the mainframe, and 92 of the top 100 banks rely on the mainframe to provide at-your-fingertip banking services to the customers (many via mobile).  CICS, according to IBM, handles 1.1 million transactions every second, every day. By comparison, Google handles a mere 59,421 searches every second.

cics at-interconnect-2015-1-638

CICS at IBM Interconnect 2015

H&W, a top mainframe ISV recently released its State of CICS in the Modern Enterprise study. Find a copy of the study here.  For starters, it found that nearly two-thirds on respondents run 51-100% their business-critical applications online through CICS. Within government, 32% of respondents reported running 75-100% of business-critical applications through CICS.

A different study suggests that CICS applications handle more than 30 billion transactions per day and process more than $1 trillion dollars’ worth of business each week. Mainframe data also still drives information systems worldwide. Approximately 60 percent of organizations responding to a 2013 Arcati survey said they manage 40 to 100 percent of their enterprise data on the mainframe.

Integrating legacy systems is a strategy mainframe sites continue to adopt. In fact, 74 percent of respondents in that survey said specifically they are web-enabling CICS subsystems. However, as organizations pursue this strategy, challenges can include unlocking the data, keeping the applications and data available to users, and maintaining data integrity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Nothing new for data center managers about this.

According to the H&W study, online CICS usage has gone up in the last 3 years, from 54% of respondents reporting running over half of their business-crit applications through CICS to 62% in 2015. Hope people will finally stop talking about the mainframe heading toward extinction.

CICS also has carved out a place on the web and with mobile. Sixty-five percent of respondents say at least some of their business-crit applications are available via PC, phone, tablet, and web-based interfaces while 11% more reported plans to mobile- and web-enable their mainframe apps in the future. Thirteen percent reported no plans to do so. Government sector respondents reported that they were significantly more likely to not make the applications available for online access; so much for open government and transparency.

CICS availability proved to raise no concern although a few were concerned with performance. Based on the study results in 2012 some predicted that companies would be moving away from CICS by now. These predictions, apparently, have not come to pass, at least not yet.

In fact, as far as the future of CICS, the technology seems to be facing a remarkably stable outlook for the next 3-5 years. The largest number of respondents, 37%, expected the number of CICS applications to remain the same in that period while 34% said they would be decreasing. More encouragingly, 27% of respondents planned to increase their number of CICS applications accessible online. In the financial services segment, 38% planned to increase the number of online CICS applications while only 10% expected to decrease the number of online applications. Given the demands by banking customers for mobile apps the increase in the number of CICS applications makes perfect sense.

The researchers concluded that CICS continues to play an important role for the majority of mainframe shops surveyed and an increasingly important role for a significant chunk of them.  The respondents also reported that, in general, they were satisfied with CICS performance even in the face of increasingly complex online workloads.

Mainframe CICS may see even more action going forward depending on what companies do with Internet of Things. As with mobile traffic, companies may turn to CICS to handle critical aspects of backend IoT activity, which has the potential to become quite large.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

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