Can SDS and Flash Resurrect IBM Storage?

As part of IBM’s ongoing string of quarterly losses storage has consistently contributed to the red ink, but the company is betting on cloud storage, all-flash strategy, and software defined storage (SDS) to turn things around. Any turn-around, however, is closely tied to the success of IBM’s strategic imperatives, which have emerged as bright spots amid the continuing quarterly losses; especially cloud, analytics, and cognitive computing.

climate-data-requires-fast-access-1

Climate study needs large amounts of fast data access

As a result, IBM needs to respond to two challenges created by its customers: 1) changes like the increased adoption of cloud, analytics, and most recently cognitive computing and 2) the need by customers to reduce the cost of the IT infrastructure. The problem as IBM sees it is this: How do I simultaneously optimize the traditional application infrastructure and free up money to invest in a new generation application infrastructure, especially if I expect move forward into the cognitive era at some point? IBM’s answer is to invest in flash and SDS.

A few years ago DancingDinosaur was skeptical, for example, that flash deployment would lower storage costs except in situations where low cost IOPS was critical. Today between the falling cost of flash and new ways to deploy increasingly cheaper flash DancingDinosaur now believes Flash storage can save IT real money.

According to the Evaluator Group and cited by IBM, flash and hybrid cloud technologies are dramatically changing the way companies deploy storage and design applications. As new applications are created–often for mobile or distributed access–the ability to store data in the right place, on the right media, and with the right access capability will become even more important.

In response, companies are adding cloud to lower costs, flash to increase performance, and SDS to add flexibility. IBM is integrating these capabilities together with security and data management for faster return on investment.  Completing the IBM pitch, the company offers choice among on-premise storage, SDS, or storage as a cloud service.

In an announcement earlier this week IBM introduced six products:

  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize 7.8 with transparent cloud tiering
  • IBM Spectrum Scale 4.2.2 with cloud data sharing
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize family flash enhancements
  • IBM Storwize family upgrades
  • IBM DS8880 High Performance Flash Enclosure Gen2
  • IBM DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server
  • VersaStack—a joint IBM-Cisco initiative

In short, these announcements address Hybrid Cloud enablement, as a standard feature for new and existing users of Spectrum Virtualize to enable data sharing to the cloud through Spectrum Scale, which can sync file and object data across on-premises and cloud storage to connect cloud native applications. Plus, more high density, highly scalable all-flash storage now sports a new high density expansion enclosure that includes new 7TB and 15TB flash drives.

IBM Storwize, too, is included, now able to grow up to 8x larger than previously without disruption. That means up to 32PB of flash storage in only four racks to meet the needs of fast-growing cloud workloads in space-constrained data centers. Similarly, IBM’s new DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server (ESS) offers up to 8x better performance than HDD-based solutions for big data and analytics workloads. Built with IBM Spectrum Scale ESS includes virtually unlimited scaling, enterprise security features, and unified file, object, and HDFS support.

The z can play in this party too. IBM’s DS8888 now delivers 2x better performance and 3x more efficient use of rack space for mission-critical applications such as credit card and banking transactions as well as airline reservations running on IBM’s z System or IBM Power Systems. DancingDinosaur first reported on the all flash z, the DS8888, when it was introduced last May.

Finally hybrid cloud enablement for existing and new on-premises storage enhancements through IBM Spectrum Virtualize, which brings hybrid cloud capabilities for block storage to the Storwize family, FlashSystem V9000, SVC, and VersaStack, the IBM-Cisco collaboration.

Behind every SDS deployment lies some actual physical storage of some type. Many opt for generic, low cost white box storage to save money.  As part of IBM’s latest SDS offerings you can choose among any of nearly 400 storage systems from IBM and others. Doubt any of those others are white box products but at least they give you some non-IBM options to potentially lower your storage costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

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