Travelport and IBM launch industry AI travel platform

Uh oh, if you have been a little sloppy with travel expenses, it’s time to clean up your travel act before AI starts monitoring your reimbursed travel. IBM and Travelport are teaming up to offer the industry’s first AI-based travel platform to intelligently manage corporate travel spend while leveraging IBM Watson capabilities to unlock previously unavailable data insights.

As IBM explains it, the new travel platform will be delivered via the IBM Cloud and exploits IBM Watson capabilities to intelligently track, manage, predict and analyze travel costs to fundamentally change how companies manage and optimize their travel programs. Typically, each work group submits its own travel expenses and reconciliation and reimbursement can be handled by different groups.

With annual global business travel spend estimated to reach a record $1.2 trillion this year, as projected by the Global Business Travel Association, corporate travel managers need new ways to reduce costs. That requires consolidating and normalizing all the information. Currently for businesses to get a full picture of travel patterns a travel manager might have to sift through data silos from travel agencies, cards, expense systems, and suppliers for end-to-end visibility of spend and compliance across all travel subcategories.  This, however, is usually undertaken from an historical view rather than in real time, which is one reason why reimbursement can take so long. As an independent contractor, DancingDinosaur generally has to submit travel expenses at the end of the project and wait forever for payment.

IBM continues: The new platform, dubbed Travel Manager,  features advanced artificial intelligence, and provides cognitive computing and predictive data analytics using what-if type scenarios, while integrated with travel and expense data to help travel management teams, procurement category managers, business units, finance, and human resource departments optimize their travel program, control spend, and enhance the end-traveler experience.  Maybe they will even squeeze independent contractors into the workflow.

The special sauce in all of this results from how IBM combines data with Travelport, a travel commerce platform on its own, to produce IBM Travel Manager as an AI platform that oversees corporate travel expenses. In the process, IBM Travel Manager gives users complete, unified access to previously siloed information, which, when combined with travel data from the Travelport global distribution system (GDS), can then be used to create real-time predictive analytics recommending how, say, adjustments in travel booking behavior patterns can positively impact a company’s travel budget.

Travelport, itself, is a heavyweight in the travel industry. It relies on technology to make the experience of buying and managing travel better. Through its travel commerce platform it provides distribution, technology, payment and other capabilities for the $7 trillion global travel and tourism industry. The platform facilitates travel commerce by connecting the world’s leading travel providers with online and offline travel buyers in a proprietary (B2B) travel marketplace.

The company helps with all aspects of the travel supply chain from airline merchandising, hotel content and distribution, mobile commerce to B2B payments. Last year its platform processed over $83 billion of travel spend, helping its customers maximize the value of every trip.

IBM Travel Manager combines and normalizes data from diverse sources, allowing for more robust insights and benchmarking than other reporting solutions. It also taps AI to unlock previously unavailable insights from multiple internal and external data sources. The product is expected to be commercially available to customers through both IBM and Travelport.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.

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