IBM Introduces New DS8880 All-Flash Arrays

January 13, 2017

Yesterday IBM introduced three new members of the DS8000 line, each an all-flash product.  The new, all-flash storage products are designed for midrange and large enterprises, where high availability, continuous up-time, and performance are critical.

ibm-flash-ds8888-mainframe-ficon

IBM envisions these boxes for more than the z’s core OLTP workloads. According to the company, they are built to provide the speed and reliability needed for workloads ranging from enterprise resource planning (ERP) and financial transactions to cognitive applications like machine learning and natural language processing. The solutions are designed to support cognitive workloads, which can be used to uncover trends and patterns that help improve decision-making, customer service, and ROI. ERP and financial transactions certainly constitute conventional OLTP but the cognitive workloads are more analytical and predictive.

The three products:

  • IBM DS8884 F
  • IBM DS8886 F
  • IBM DS8888 F

The F signifies all-flash.  Each was designed with High-Performance Flash Enclosures Gen2. IBM did not just slap flash into existing hard drive enclosures.  Rather, it reports undertaking a complete redesign of the flash-to-z interaction. As IBM puts it: through deep integration between the flash and the z, IBM has embedded software that facilitates data protection, remote replication, and optimization for midrange and large enterprises. The resulting new microcode is ideal for cognitive workloads on z and Power Systems requiring the highest availability and system reliability possible. IBM promises that the boxes will deliver superior performance and uncompromised availability for business-critical workloads. In short, fast enough to catch bad guys before they leave the cash register or teller window. Specifically:

  • The IBM DS8884 F—labelled as the business class offering–boasts the lowest entry cost for midrange enterprises (prices starting at $90,000 USD). It runs an IBM Power Systems S822, which is a 6-core POWER8 processor per S822 with 256 GB Cache (DRAM), 32 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4 – 154 TB of flash capacity.
  • The IBM DS8886 F—the enterprise class offering for large organizations seeking high performance– sports a 24-core POWER8 processor per S824. It offers 2 TB Cache (DRAM), 128 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4 – 614.4 TB of flash capacity. That’s over one-half petabyte of high performance flash storage.
  • The IBM DS8888 F—labelled an analytics class offering—promises the highest performance for faster insights. It runs on the IBM Power Systems E850 with a 48-core POWER8 processor per E850. It also comes with 2 TB Cache (DRAM), 128 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4TB – 1.22 PB of flash capacity. Guess crossing the petabyte level qualifies it as an analytics and cognitive device along with the bigger processor complex

As IBM emphasized in the initial briefing, it engineered these storage devices to surpass the typical big flash storage box. For starters, IBM bypassed the device adapter to connect the z directly to the high performance storage controller. IBM’s goal was to reduce latency and optimize all-flash storage, not just navigate a simple replacement by swapping new flash for ordinary flash or, banish the thought, HDD.

“We optimized the data path,” explained Jeff Barber IBM systems VP for HE Storage BLE (DS8, DP&R and SAN). To that end, IBM switched from a 1u to a 4u enclosure, runs on shared-nothing clusters, and boosted throughput performance. The resulting storage, he added, “does database better than anyone; we can run real-time analytics.”  The typical analytics system—a shared system running Hadoop, won’t even come close to these systems, he added. With the DS8888, you can deploy a real-time cognitive cluster with minimal latency flash.

DancingDinosaur always appreciates hearing from actual users. Working through a network of offices, supported by a team of over 850 people, Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (Zavod za zdravstveno zavarovanje Slovenije), provides health insurance to approximately two million customers. In order to successfully manage its new customer-facing applications (such as electronic ordering processing and electronic receipts) its storage system required additional capacity and performance. After completing research on solutions capable of managing these applications –which included both Hitachi and EMC –the organization deployed the IBM DS8886 along with DB2 for z/OS data server software to provide an integrated data backup and restore system. (Full disclosure: DancingDinosaur has not verified this customer story.)

“As long-time users of IBM storage infrastructure and mainframes, our upgrade to the IBM DS8000 with IBM business partner Comparex was an easy choice. Since then, its high performance and reliability have led us to continually deploy newer DS8000 models as new features and functions have provided us new opportunities,” said Bojan Fele, CIO of Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia. “Our DS8000 implementation has improved our reporting capabilities by reducing time to actionable insights. Furthermore, it has increased employee productivity, ensuring we can better serve our clients.”

For full details and specs on these products, click here

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

z System-Power-Storage Still Live at IBM

January 5, 2017

A mid-December briefing by Tom Rosamilia, SVP, IBM Systems, reassured some that IBM wasn’t putting its systems and platforms on the backburner after racking up financial quarterly losses for years. Expect new IBM systems in 2017. A few days later IBM announced that Japan-based APLUS Co., Ltd., which operates credit card and settlement service businesses, selected IBM LinuxONE as its mission-critical system for credit card payment processing. Hooray!

linuxone-emperor-2

LinuxONE’s security and industry-leading performance will ensure APLUS achieves its operational objectives as online commerce heats up and companies rely on cloud applications to draw and retain customers. Especially in Japan, where online and mobile shopping has become increasingly popular, the use of credit cards has grown, with more than 66 percent of consumers choosing that method for conducting online transactions. And with 80 percent enterprise hybrid cloud adoption predicted by 2017, APLUS is well positioned to connect cloud transactions leveraging LinuxONE. Throw in IBM’s expansion of blockchain capabilities and the APLUS move looks even smarter.

With the growth of international visitors spending money, IBM notes, and the emergence of FinTech firms in Japan have led to a diversification of payment methods the local financial industry struggles to respond. APLUS, which issues well-known credit cards such as T Card Plus, plans to offer leading-edge financial services by merging groups to achieve lean operations and improved productivity and efficiency. Choosing to update its credit card payment system with LinuxONE infrastructure, APLUS will benefit from an advanced IT environment to support its business growth by helping provide near-constant uptime. In addition to updating its server architecture, APLUS has deployed IBM storage to manage mission-critical data, the IBM DS8880 mainframe-attached storage that delivers integration with IBM z Systems and LinuxONE environments.

LinuxONE, however, was one part of the IBM Systems story Rosamilia set out to tell.  There also is the z13s, for encrypted hybrid clouds and the z/OS platform for Apache Spark data analytics and even more secure cloud services via blockchain on LinuxONE, by way of Bluemix or on premises.

z/OS will get attention in 2017 too. “z/OS is the best damn OLTP system in the world,” declared Rosamilia. He went on to imply that enhancements and upgrades to key z systems were coming in 2017, especially CICS, IMS, and a new release of DB2. Watch for new announcements coming soon as IBM tries to push z platform performance and capacity for z/OS and OLTP.

Rosamilia also talked up the POWER story. Specifically, Google and Rackspace have been developing OpenPOWER systems for the Open Compute Project.  New POWER LC servers running POWER8 and the NVIDIA NVLink accelerator, more innovations through the OpenCAPI Consortium, and the team of IBM and Nvidia to deliver PowerAI, part of IBM’s cognitive efforts.

As much as Rosamilia may have wanted to talk about platforms and systems IBM continues to avoid using terms like systems and platforms. So Rosamilia’s real intent was to discuss z and Power in conjunction with IBM’s strategic initiatives.  Remember these: cloud, big data, mobile, analytics. Lately, it seems, those initiatives have been culled down to cloud, hybrid cloud, and cognitive systems.

IBM’s current message is that IT innovation no longer comes from just the processor. Instead, it comes through scaling performance by workload and sustaining leadership through ecosystem partnerships.  We’ve already seen some of the fruits of that innovation through the Power community. Would be nice to see some of that coming to the z too, maybe through the open mainframe project. But that isn’t about z/0S. Any boost in CICS, DB2, and IMS will have to come from the core z team. The open mainframe project is about Linux on z.

The first glimpse we had of this came last spring in a system dubbed Minsky, which was described back then by commentator Timothy Prickett Morgan. With the Minsky machine, IBM is using NVLink ports on the updated Power8 CPU, which was shown in April at the OpenPower Summit and is making its debut in systems actually manufactured by ODM Wistron and rebadged, sold, and supported by IBM. The NVLink ports are bundled up in a quad to deliver 80 GB/sec bandwidth between a pair of GPUs and between each GPU and the updated Power8 CPU.

The IBM version, Morgan describes, aims to create a very brawny node with very tight coupling of GPUs and CPUs so they can better share memory, have fewer overall GPUs, and more bandwidth between the compute elements. IBM is aiming Minsky at HPC workloads, according to Morgan, but there is no reason it cannot be used for deep learning or even accelerated databases.

Is this where today’s z data center managers want to go?  No one is likely to spurn more performance, especially if it is accompanied with a price/performance improvement.  Whether rank-and-file z data centers are queueing up for AI or cognitive workloads will have to be seen. The sheer volume and scale of expected activity, however, will require some form of automated intelligent assist.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes for 2017

December 21, 2016

DancingDinosaur is taking the rest of the year off. The next posting will be Jan. 5. In the meantime, best wishes for delightful holidays and a peaceful and prosperous New Year. Good time to read a new book (below).

iot-book-cover-2

Until then, based on comments IBM has hinted at we can expect a new z in 2017, might be the z14 as some suggest or something else. Expect it to be optimized for cognitive computing and the other strategic imperatives IBM has been touting for the past two years. But it also will need to satisfy the installed mainframe data center base so expect more I/O, faster performance, and improved price/performance.

Was nice to see LinuxONE come into its own late this year.  Expect to see much more from this z-based machine in 2017. Probably a new LinuxONE machine in the New Year as well.

And we can expect the new POWER9 this year.  That should perk things up a bit, but realistically, it appears IBM considers platform a dirty word. They really want to be a cloud player doing cognitive computing across a slew of vertical industries.

FYI, an important new book on IoT, Building the Internet of Things, by Maciej Kranz was published late in Nov. (See graphic above. It hit third place on the NY Times non-fiction best seller list in mid December. Not bad for a business tech book. You can find it on Amazon.com here. Kranz is a Cisco executive so if you have a relationship with a Cisco rep see if they’ll give you a free copy. Full disclosure: your blogger was the ghostwriter for the book and was thanked in the acknowledgements at the end of the book.  Like movies, Kranz and I have already started on the sequel, The Co-Economy (although the title may change). The new book is briefly described in the IoT book (pg. 161).

BTW, if you’ve always wanted to author a book but didn’t know how to start or finish or proceed, feel welcome to contact me through Technologywriter.com at the bottom of this post. We’ll figure out how to get it done.

Again, best wishes for the holidays. See you in the New Year.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here

Compuware Acquires Standardware COPE IMS to Speed DevOps and Save Money

December 16, 2016

Compuware, in early December, acquired the assets of Standardware, the leading provider of IMS virtualization technology.  Standardware’s COPE reduces the considerable time, cost and technical difficulty associated with the development and testing of IMS systems, enabling z-based data centers to significantly increase their digital business agility while also enabling less mainframe-experienced staff to perform IMS-related DevOps tasks. In addition, it allows IMS to run as a virtualized image, saving significantly on software charges.

compuware-ims-virtual-environment-31594_apollo_technical_graphic_3

Standardware’s COPE IMS, courtesy of Compuware

All three Compuware acquisitions this year—Standardware, ISPW, Itegrations—aimed to facilitate mainframe code management or app dev. The company’s acquisition of ISPW brought source code management and release automation. Itegrations eased the migration to ISPW from CA Endevor. Now Standardware brings IMS virtualization technology.

IMS continues as a foundational database and transaction management technology for systems of record at large global mainframe enterprises, especially in industries such as banking, insurance, airlines and such. Its stability, dependability, and high efficiency at scale make it particularly valuable as a back-end resource for high-traffic, customer-facing apps. IBM’s mainframe Information Management System (IMS) provides a hierarchical database and information management system with extensive transaction processing capabilities. It offers a completely different database model from the common relational model behind IBM’s DB2.

IBM touts IMS as the most secure, highest performing, and lowest cost hierarchical database management software for online transaction processing (OLTP). IMS is used by many of the top Fortune 1000 companies worldwide. Collectively these companies process more than 50 billion transactions per day through IMS, and they do so securely.

As Compuware puts it, IMS remains a deeply foundational database and transaction management technology for systems of record at large global enterprises, especially in the core mainframe segments like financial services or transportation. Its stability, dependability and high efficiency ensure it can continue to play an important role as a back-end resource for high-traffic customer-facing apps. All that’s needed is to reduce the effort required to use it.

Conventional approaches to the development and testing of IMS systems, however, can be excessively slow, technically challenging, and expensive. This is too high a technical price to pay in today’s agile, fast iteration app dev environment.  For example,  the set-up of IMS application development environments require configuring dedicated IMS regions and databases, which is especially time-consuming; additional resources must be defined and compiled for each instance, and at every stage of development expect testing, training, and systems integration. Worse yet, these tasks typically require experienced DBAs and system programmers with IMS-specific skills, making it an increasingly problematic and costly constraint given the generational shift underway in IT, which makes those skills increasingly rare.

As a result of these bottlenecks and resource constraints, large enterprises can find themselves far less nimble than their smaller competitors and unable to fully leverage their current IMS assets in response to digital requirements.  That leaves the mainframe shop at a distinct disadvantage.

Since COPE comes well integrated with Compuware Xpediter, an automated mainframe debugging tool, many such problems go away. Xpediter, which is interactive,  can be used within the Standardware virtualized environment and COPE. When a problem occurs, developers can quickly set up an interactive test session with minimal effort and resolve the problem. When they’re done, they can confidently move the application into production. And now that Xpediter is integrated with COPE IMS virtualization lets multiple developers debug application code in the same or different logical IMS systems within the virtualized COPE IMS environment.

And therein lies the savings for mainframe shops. As Tyler Allman, Compuware’s COPE product manager explains, COPE converts IMS to run in a virtual environment. It takes a COPE expert to set it up initially, but once set up, it can run as a logical IMS system with almost no ongoing maintenance, which results in administrative savings.

On the software side, IMS is licensed as part of the usual rolling average 4hr workload software billing. Once the environment has been virtualized with COPE, you can run multiple IMS logical regions at no additional cost. The savings experienced by mainframe data centers , Allman suggests, can amount to tens if not hundreds of thousands of dollars. These saving alone can justify COPE.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here

 

IBM Demonstrates Blockchain Progress and Clients

December 9, 2016

IBM must have laid off its lawyers or something since never before has the company seemed so ready to reveal clients by name and the projects they’re engaged in.  That has been going on for months and recently it has accelerated.  Credit IBM’s eagerness to get blockchain established fast and show progress with the open community HyperLedger Project.

walmart-ibm-and-tsinghua-university

Exploring the use of blockchain to bring safer food

Since early in 2016 IBM announced almost 20 companies and projects involving blockchain. A bunch are financial services as you would expect. A couple of government entities are included. And then, there is Walmart, a household name if ever there was one.  Walmart is turning to blockchain to manage its supply chain, particularly in regard to food safety and food provenance (tracking where the food came from and its path from source to shelf to the customer).

Here’s how it works: With blockchain, food products can be digitally tracked from an ecosystem of suppliers to store shelves and ultimately to consumers. When applied to the food supply chain, digital product information such as farm origination details, batch numbers, factory and processing data, expiration dates, storage temperatures and shipping detail are digitally connected to food items and the information is entered into the blockchain along every step of the process. Each piece of information provides critical data points that could potentially reveal food safety issues with the product. The information captured and if there is a problem it becomes easy to track down where the process went wrong.

Furthermore, the record created by the blockchain can also help retailers better manage the shelf-life of products in individual stores, and further strengthen safeguards related to food authenticity. In short, Walmart gains better visibility into the supply chain, logistics and food safety as they create a new model for food traceability, supply chain transparency, and auditability using IBM Blockchain based on the open source Linux Foundation Hyperledger Project fabric.

Walmart adds: “As advocates of promoting greater transparency in the food system for our customers, we look forward to working with IBM and Tsinghua University to explore how this technology might be used as a more effective food traceability solution,” said Frank Yiannas, Vice President, Food Safety, Walmart.  If successful, it might get rolled out to North America and the rest of the world.

IBM is not expecting blockchain to emerge full blown overnight. As it noted in its announcement on Wed. blockchain has the potential to transform the way industries conduct business transactions. This will require a complete ecosystem of industry players working together, allowing businesses to benefit from the network effect of blockchain. To that end IBM introduced a blockchain ecosystem to help accelerate the creation of blockchain networks.

And Walmart isn’t the only early adopter of the HyperLedger and blockchain.  The financial services industry is a primary target. For example, the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (BTMU) and IBM agreed to examine the design, management and execution of contracts among business partners using blockchain. This is one of the first projects built on the Hyperledger Project fabric, an open-source blockchain platform, to use blockchain for real-life contract management on the IBM Cloud.  IBM and BTMU have built a prototype of smart contracts on a blockchain to improve the efficiency and accountability of service level agreements in multi-party business interactions.

Another financial services player, the CLS Group (CLS), a provider of risk management and operational services for the global foreign exchange (FX) market, announced its intent to release a payment netting service, CLS Netting will use blockchain for buy-side and sell-side institutions’ FX trades that are settled outside the CLS settlement service. The system will have a Hyperledger-based platform, which delivers a standardized suite of post-trade and risk mitigation services for the entire FX market.

To make blockchain easy and secure, IBM has set up a LinuxONE z System as a cloud service for organizations requiring a secure environment for blockchain networks. IBM is targeting this service to organizations in regulated industries. The service will allow companies to test and run blockchain projects that handle private data. The secure blockchain cloud environment is designed for organizations that need to prove blockchain is safe for themselves and for their trading partners, whether customers or other parties.

As blockchain gains traction and organizations begin to evaluate cloud-based production environments for their first blockchain projects, they are exploring ways to maximize the security and compliance of the technology for business-critical applications. Security is critical not just within the blockchain itself but with all the technology touching the blockchain ledger.

With advanced features that help protect data and ensure the integrity of the overall network, LinuxONE is designed to meet the stringent security requirements of the financial, health care, and government sectors while helping foster compliance. As blockchain ramps up it potentially can drive massive numbers of transactions to the z. Maybe even triggering another discount as with mobile transactions.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

AI and IBM Watson Fuel Interest in App Dev among Mainframe Shops

December 1, 2016

BMC’s 2016 mainframe survey, covered by DancingDinosaur here, both directly and indirectly pointed to increased activity in regard to data center applications. Mainly this took the form of increased interest in Java on the z as a platform for new applications. Specifically, 72% of overall respondents reported using Java today while 88% reported plans to increase their use Java. At the same time, the use of Linux on the z has been steadily growing year over year; 41% in 2014, 48% in 2015, 52% in 2016. This growth of both point to a heightened interest in application development, management, and change.

ibm-project-dataworks-visualization-1

IBM’s Project DataWorks uses Watson Analytics to create complex visualizations with one line of code

IBM has been feeding this kind of AppDev interest with its continued enhancement of Bluemix and the rollout of the Bluemix Garage method.  More recently, it recently announced a partnership with Topcoder, a global software development community comprised of more than one million designers, developers, data scientists, and competitive programmers with the aim of stimulating developers looking to harness the power of Watson to create the next generation AI apps, APIs, and solutions.

According to Forrester VP and Principal Analyst JP Gownder in the IBM announcement, by 2019, automation will change every job category by at least 25%. Additionally, IDC predicts that 75% of developer teams will include cognitive/AI functionality in one or more applications by 2018. The industry is driving toward a new level of computing potential not witnessed since the introduction of Big Data

To further drive the cultivation of this new style of developer, IBM is encouraging participation in Topcoder-run hackathons and coding competitions. Here developers can easily access a range of Watson services – such as Conversation, Sentiment Analysis, or speech APIs – to build powerful new tools with the help of cognitive computing and artificial intelligence. Topcoder hosts 7,000 code challenges a year and has awarded $80 million to its community. In addition, now developers will have the opportunity to showcase and monetize their solutions on the IBM Marketplace, while businesses will be able to access a new pipeline of talent experienced with Watson and AI.

In addition to a variety of academic partnerships, IBM recently announced the introduction of an AI Nano degree program with Udacity to help developers establish a foundational understanding of artificial intelligence.  Plus, IBM offers the IBM Learning Lab, which features more than 100 curated online courses and cognitive uses cases from providers like Codeacademy, Coursera, Big Data University, and Udacity. Don’t forget, IBM DeveloperWorks, which offers how-to tutorials and courses on IBM tools and open standard technologies for all phases of the app dev lifecycle.

To keep the AI development push going, recently IBM unveiled the experimental release of Project Intu, a new system-agnostic platform designed to enable embodied cognition. The new platform allows developers to embed Watson functions into various end-user devices, offering a next generation architecture for building cognitive-enabled experiences.

Project Intu is accessible via the Watson Developer Cloud and also available on Intu Gateway and GitHub. The initiative simplifies the process for developers wanting to create cognitive experiences in various form factors such as spaces, avatars, robots, or IoT devices. In effect, it extends cognitive technology into the physical world. The platform enables devices to interact more naturally with users, triggering different emotions and behaviors and creating more meaningful and immersive experiences for users.

Developers can simplify and integrate Watson services, such as Conversation, Language, and Visual Recognition with the capabilities of the device to act out the interaction with the user. Instead of a developer needing to program each individual movement of a device or avatar, Project Intu makes it easy to combine movements that are appropriate for performing specific tasks like assisting a customer in a retail setting or greeting a visitor in a hotel in a way that is natural for the visitor.

Project Intu is changing how developers make architectural decisions about integrating different cognitive services into an end-user experience – such as what actions the systems will take and what will trigger a device’s particular functionality. Project Intu offers developers a ready-made environment on which to build cognitive experiences running on a wide variety of operating systems – from Raspberry PI to MacOS, Windows to Linux machines.

With initiatives like these, the growth of cognitive-enabled applications will likely accelerate. As IBM reports, IDC estimates that “by 2018, 75% of developer teams will include Cognitive/AI functionality in one or more applications/services.”  This is a noticeable jump from last year’s prediction that 50% of developers would leverage cognitive/AI functionality by 2018

For those z data centers surveyed by BMC that worried about keeping up with Java and big data, AI adds yet an entirely new level of complexity. Fortunately, the tools to work with it are rapidly falling into place.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

 

IBM Power System S822LC for HPC Beat Sort Record by 3.3x

November 17, 2016

The new IBM Power System S822LC for High Performance Computing servers set a new benchmark for sorting by taking less than 99 seconds (98.8 seconds) to finish sorting 100 terabytes of data in the Indy GraySort category, improving on last year’s best result, 329 seconds, by a factor of 3.3. The win proved a victory not only for the S822LC but for the entire OpenPOWER community. The team of Tencent, IBM, and Mellanox has been named the Winner of the Sort Benchmark annual global computing competition for 2016.

rack-of-new-ibm-power-systems-s822lc-for-high-performance-computing-servers-1Power System S822LC for HPC

Specifically, the machine, an IBM Power S822LC for High Performance Computing (HPC), features NVIDIA NVLink technology optimized for the Power architecture and NVIDIA’s latest GPU technology. The new system supports emerging computing methods of artificial intelligence, particularly deep learning. The combination, newly dubbed IBM PowerAI, provides a continued path for Watson, IBM’s cognitive solutions platform, to extend its artificial intelligence expertise in the enterprise by using several deep learning methods to train Watson.

Actually Tencent Cloud Data Intelligence (the distributed computing platform of Tencent Cloud) won each category in both the GraySort and MinuteSort benchmarks, establishing four new world records with its performance, outperforming the 2015 best speeds by 2-5x. Said Zeus Jiang, Vice President of Tencent Cloud and General Manager of Tencent’s Data Platform Department: “In the future, the ability to manage big data will be the foundation of successful Internet businesses.”

To get this level of performance Tencent runs 512 IBM OpenPOWER LC servers and Mellanox’100Gb interconnect technology, improving the performance of Tencent Cloud big data products with the infrastructure. Online prices for the S822LC starts at about $9600 for 2-socket, 2U with up to 20 cores (2.9-3.3Ghz), 1 TB memory (32 DIMMs), 230 GB/sec sustained memory bandwidth, 2x SFF (HDD/SSD), 2 TB storage, 5 PCIe slots, 4 CAPI enabled, up to 2 NVidia K80 GPU. Be sure to shop for volume discounts.

The 2016 Sort Benchmark Results below (apologies in advance if this table breaks apart)

Sort Benchmark Competition 20 Records (Tencent Cloud ) 2015 World Records 2016 Improvement
Daytona GraySort 44.8 TB/min 15.9 TB/min 2.8X greater performance
Indy GraySort 60.7 TB/min 18.2 TB/min 3.3X greater performance
Daytona MinuteSort 37 TB/min 7.7 TB/min 4.8X greater performance
Indy MinuteSort 55 TB/min 11 TB/min 5X greater performance

Pretty impressive, huh. As IBM explains it: Tencent Cloud used 512 IBM OpenPOWER servers and Mellanox’100Gb interconnect technology, improving the performance of Tencent Cloud big data products with the infrastructure. Then Tom Rosamilia, IBM Senior VP weighed in: “Industry leaders like Tencent are helping IBM and our OpenPOWER partners push performance boundaries for a cognitive era defined by big data and advanced analytics.” The computing record achieved by Tencent Cloud on OpenPOWER turned out to be an important milestone for the OpenPOWER Foundation too.

Added Amir Prescher, Sr. Vice President, Business Development, at Mellanox Technologies: “Real-time-analytics and big data environments are extremely demanding, and the network is critical in linking together the extra high performance of IBM POWER-based servers and Tencent Cloud’s massive amounts of data,” In effect, Tencent Cloud developed an optimized hardware/software platform to achieve new computing records while demonstrating that Mellanox’s 100Gb/s Ethernet technology can deliver total infrastructure efficiency and improve application performance, which should make it a favorite for big data applications.

Behind all of this was the new IBM Power System S822LC for High Performance Computing servers. Currently the servers feature a new IBM POWER8 chip designed for demanding workloads including artificial intelligence, deep learning and advanced analytics.  However, a new POWER9 chips has already been previewed and is expected next year.  Whatever the S822LC can do running POWER8 just imagine how much more it will do running POWER9, which IBM describes as a premier acceleration platform. DancingDinosaur covered POWER9 in early Sept. here.

To capitalize on the hardware, IBM is making a new deep learning software toolkit available, PowerAI, which runs on the recently announced IBM Power S822LC server built for artificial intelligence that features NVIDIA NVLink interconnect technology optimized for IBM’s Power architecture. The hardware-software combination provides more than 2X performance over comparable servers with 4 GPUs running AlexNet with Caffe. The same 4-GPU Power-based configuration running AlexNet with BVLC Caffe can also outperform 8 M40 GPU-based x86 configurations, making it the world’s fastest commercially available enterprise systems platform on two versions of a key deep learning framework.

Deep learning is a fast growing, machine learning method that extracts information by crunching through millions of pieces of data to detect and ranks the most important aspects of the data. Publicly supported among leading consumer web and mobile application companies, deep learning is quickly being adopted by more traditional enterprises across a wide range of industry sectors; in banking to advance fraud detection through facial recognition; in automotive for self-driving automobiles; and in retail for fully automated call centers with computers that can better understand speech and answer questions. Is your data center ready for deep learning?

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

BMC Mainframe Survey Confirms z System Is Here to Stay

November 11, 2016

No surprise there. BMC’s 11th annual mainframe survey covering 1,200 mainframe executives and tech professionals found 58% of respondents reported usage of the mainframe is increasing as they look to capitalize on every infrastructure advantage it provides and add more workloads. Another 23% consider the mainframe as the best option to run critical work.

ibm_system_z10

IBM z10

Driving the continuing interest in the mainframe are the new demands for data handling, scalable processing, analytics, and more. According to the BMC survey nearly 60% of companies are seeing increased data and transaction volumes. They opt to stay with the mainframe for its highly secure, superior data handling and transaction serving, particularly as digital business adds unpredictability and volatility to workloads.

Overall respondents fell into three primary groups: 1) entrenched mainframe shops, 58% that are on board for the long haul; 2) shops, 23% that intend to maintain a steady amount of work on the mainframe; and 3) the 19% that are moving away from the mainframe.  The first two groups, committed mainframe shops, amount to just over survey 80% of the respondents.

Many companies surveyed are focused on addressing the increased workload demands, especially the rapidly growing demand for new applications. But surprisingly, the survey does not directly touch on hybrid cloud, cognitive computing or any of the latest technologies IBM has been promoting, not even DevOps, which can streamline mainframe application development and deployment. “We are not hearing much about a hybrid cloud environments or blockchain yet. Most companies seem to be in the early tire kicking stage, observed John McKenny, BMC Vice President, Strategy and Operations.

Eighty-eight percent of companies in the first group, entrenched mainframe shops, for example, are looking to increase the workloads they run on Java on the mainframe, primarily to address new application demands. It also doesn’t hurt that Java on the mainframe also can help lower data center costs by directing workloads to lower cost assist processors.

Other interesting BMC survey findings:

  • Half of the respondents report keeping 50% of their data on the mainframe and continue to invest in the platform for reasons you already know—security, availability, data serving capability
  • Continued steady growth of Linux in production on the z: 41% in 2014, 48% in 2015, 52% in 2016
  • Increased use of Java on the mainframe report as 67% of respondents cite need to meet growing application demand

Those looking to reduce mainframe presence cited three reasons: 1) perception of high cost, 2) outdated management understanding, and 3) looking for ways to reduce workloads over time.  DancingDinosaur has spoken with mainframe shops intending to migrate off the z and they cite the usual reasons, especially #1 above.

Top mainframe priorities for 2016 according to the BMC survey:  Cost reduction/optimization (65%); data privacy, compliance, security (50%); application availability (49%); application modernization (41%. Responses indicated the priorities for next year haven’t changed at all.

Surprisingly, many of the latest technologies for the z that IBM has touted recently have not yet shown up in the BMC survey responses, except maybe Java and Linux. This would include hybrid clouds, blockchain, IoT, and cognitive computing. IDC, for example, already is projecting cognitive computing to grow at a CAGR of 55.1% from 2016 to 2020. For z shops, however, cognitive computing appears almost invisible.

In some case with surveys like this you need to read between the lines. Where respondents report changes in activity levels driving application growth or the growth of interest in Java or the frequency of application changes and references to operational analytics they’re making oblique references to mobile or big data or even cognitive computing or other recent technologies for the z.

At its best, the BMC notes that digital technologies are transforming the ways in which mainframe shops conduct business and interact with their customers.  Adds BMC mainframe customer Credit Suisse: “IT departments are moving toward centralized, virtualized, and highly automated environments. This is being pursued to drive cost and processing efficiencies. Many companies realize that the Mainframe has provided these benefits for many years and is a mature and stable environment,” said Frank Cortell, Credit Suisse Director of Information Technology.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

Can SDS and Flash Resurrect IBM Storage?

November 4, 2016

As part of IBM’s ongoing string of quarterly losses storage has consistently contributed to the red ink, but the company is betting on cloud storage, all-flash strategy, and software defined storage (SDS) to turn things around. Any turn-around, however, is closely tied to the success of IBM’s strategic imperatives, which have emerged as bright spots amid the continuing quarterly losses; especially cloud, analytics, and cognitive computing.

climate-data-requires-fast-access-1

Climate study needs large amounts of fast data access

As a result, IBM needs to respond to two challenges created by its customers: 1) changes like the increased adoption of cloud, analytics, and most recently cognitive computing and 2) the need by customers to reduce the cost of the IT infrastructure. The problem as IBM sees it is this: How do I simultaneously optimize the traditional application infrastructure and free up money to invest in a new generation application infrastructure, especially if I expect move forward into the cognitive era at some point? IBM’s answer is to invest in flash and SDS.

A few years ago DancingDinosaur was skeptical, for example, that flash deployment would lower storage costs except in situations where low cost IOPS was critical. Today between the falling cost of flash and new ways to deploy increasingly cheaper flash DancingDinosaur now believes Flash storage can save IT real money.

According to the Evaluator Group and cited by IBM, flash and hybrid cloud technologies are dramatically changing the way companies deploy storage and design applications. As new applications are created–often for mobile or distributed access–the ability to store data in the right place, on the right media, and with the right access capability will become even more important.

In response, companies are adding cloud to lower costs, flash to increase performance, and SDS to add flexibility. IBM is integrating these capabilities together with security and data management for faster return on investment.  Completing the IBM pitch, the company offers choice among on-premise storage, SDS, or storage as a cloud service.

In an announcement earlier this week IBM introduced six products:

  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize 7.8 with transparent cloud tiering
  • IBM Spectrum Scale 4.2.2 with cloud data sharing
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize family flash enhancements
  • IBM Storwize family upgrades
  • IBM DS8880 High Performance Flash Enclosure Gen2
  • IBM DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server
  • VersaStack—a joint IBM-Cisco initiative

In short, these announcements address Hybrid Cloud enablement, as a standard feature for new and existing users of Spectrum Virtualize to enable data sharing to the cloud through Spectrum Scale, which can sync file and object data across on-premises and cloud storage to connect cloud native applications. Plus, more high density, highly scalable all-flash storage now sports a new high density expansion enclosure that includes new 7TB and 15TB flash drives.

IBM Storwize, too, is included, now able to grow up to 8x larger than previously without disruption. That means up to 32PB of flash storage in only four racks to meet the needs of fast-growing cloud workloads in space-constrained data centers. Similarly, IBM’s new DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server (ESS) offers up to 8x better performance than HDD-based solutions for big data and analytics workloads. Built with IBM Spectrum Scale ESS includes virtually unlimited scaling, enterprise security features, and unified file, object, and HDFS support.

The z can play in this party too. IBM’s DS8888 now delivers 2x better performance and 3x more efficient use of rack space for mission-critical applications such as credit card and banking transactions as well as airline reservations running on IBM’s z System or IBM Power Systems. DancingDinosaur first reported on the all flash z, the DS8888, when it was introduced last May.

Finally hybrid cloud enablement for existing and new on-premises storage enhancements through IBM Spectrum Virtualize, which brings hybrid cloud capabilities for block storage to the Storwize family, FlashSystem V9000, SVC, and VersaStack, the IBM-Cisco collaboration.

Behind every SDS deployment lies some actual physical storage of some type. Many opt for generic, low cost white box storage to save money.  As part of IBM’s latest SDS offerings you can choose among any of nearly 400 storage systems from IBM and others. Doubt any of those others are white box products but at least they give you some non-IBM options to potentially lower your storage costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM 3Q16 Results Telegraph a New z System in 2017

October 27, 2016

DancingDinosaur usually doesn’t like to read too much into the statements of IBM suits at financial briefings. This has been especially true since IBM introduced a new presentation format this year to downplay its platform business and emphasize its strategic imperatives. (Disclaimer: DancingDinosaur is NOT a financial analyst but a technology analyst.)

But this quarter the CFO said flat out: “Our z Systems results reflect a product cycle dynamic, seven quarters into the z13 cycle; revenue was down while margins continue to expand. We continue to add new clients to the platform and we are introducing new technologies like block chain. We announced new services to make it easier to build and test block chain networks in a secure environment as we build our block chain platform it’s been engineered to run on multiple platforms but is optimized for scale, security and resilience on both the IBM mainframe and the IBM cloud.”

linuxone-emperorLinuxONE Emperor

If you parse the first sentence–reflect a product cycle dynamic–he is not too subtly hinting that IBM needs a z System refresh if they want to stop the financial losses with z. You don’t have to be a genius to expect a new z, probably the z14, in 2017. Pictured above is the LinuxONE Emperor, a z optimized to run Linux. The same suit said “We’ve been shifting our platform to address Linux, and in the third quarter Linux grew at a double digit rate, faster than the market.” So based on that we can probably guess that the z14 (or whatever it will be called) will run z/OS, followed shortly by a LinuxONE version to further expand the z System’s Linux footprint.

Timothy Prickett Morgan picked that up too and more. He expects a z14 processor complex will be announced next year around the same time that the Power9 chip ships. In both cases, Power and z customers who can wait will wait, or, if they are smart, will demand very steep discounts on current Power8 hardware to make up for the price/performance improvements that are sure to accompany the upcoming Power9 and z machines.

When it comes to revenue 3Q16 was at best flat, but actually was down again overall. The bright spot again was IBM’s strategic imperatives. As the suit stated: in total, we continue to deliver double-digit revenue growth in our strategic imperatives led by our cloud business. Specifically, cognitive solutions were up 5% and, within that, solution software was up 8%.

Overall, growth in IBM’s strategic imperatives rose 15%. Over the last 12 months, strategic imperatives delivered nearly $32 billion in revenue and now represent 40% of IBM. The suit also emphasized strong performance in IBM’s cloud offerings which increased over 40%, led by the company’s as-a-service offerings. IBM ended the third quarter with an as-a-service run rate of $7.5 billion, up from $6.7 billion last quarter. Most of that was attributed to organic growth, not acquisitions. Also strong was IBM’s revenue performance in security and mobile. In addition, the company experienced growth in its analytic offerings, up 14% this quarter with contributions from the core analytics platform, especially the Watson platform, Watson Health, and Watson IoT.

IBM apparently is convinced that cognitive computing, defined as using data and adding intelligence into products and services to help companies make better decisions, is the wave of the future. As the company sees it, real value lies in providing cognitive capabilities via the IBM cloud. A critical element of its strategy is IBM’s industry focus. Initially industry platforms will address two substantial opportunity areas, financial services and block chain solutions. You can probably add healthcare too.

Blockchain may emerge as the sleeper, although DancingDinosaur has long been convinced that blockchain is ideal for z shops—the z already handles the transactions and delivers the reliability, scalability, availability, and security to do it right.  As IBM puts it, “we believe block chain has the potential to do for trusted transactions what the Internet did for information.” Specifically, IBM is building a complete block chain platform and is now working with over 300 clients to pioneer block chain for business, including CLS, which settles $5 trillion per day in the currency markets, to implement a distributed ledger in support of its payment netting service, and Bank of Tokyo Mitsubishi, for smart contracts to manage service level agreements and automate multi party transactions.

Says Morgan: “IBM is very enthusiastic about using Blockchain in commercial transaction processing settings, and has 40 clients testing it out on mainframes, but this workload will take a long time to grow. Presumably, IBM will also push Blockchain on Power as well.”  Morgan may be right about blockchain coming to Power, but it is a natural for the z right now, whether as a new z14 or a new z-based LinuxONE machine.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


%d bloggers like this: