Posts Tagged ‘Amazon Web Services’

Syncsort Finds New Corporate Home and Friend

September 8, 2017

Centerbridge Partners, L.P. a private investment firm, completed the $1.26 billion acquisitions of enterprise software providers Syncsort Incorporated and Vision Solutions, Inc. from affiliates of Clearlake Capital Group, L.P. Clearlake, which acquired Syncsort in 2015 and Vision in 2016, will retain a minority ownership stake in the combined company.

Syncsort is a provider of enterprise software and a player in Big Iron to Big Data solutions. DancingDinosaur has covered it here and here. According to the company, customers in more than 85 countries rely on Syncsort to move and transform mission-critical data and workloads. Vision Solutions provides business resilience tools addressing high availability, disaster recovery, migration, and data sharing for IBM Power Systems.

The company apparently hasn’t suffered from being passed between owners. Syncsort has been active in tech acquisitions for the past two years as it builds its data transformation footprint. Just a couple of weeks ago, it acquired Metron, a provider of cross-platform capacity management software, services. Metron’s signature athene solution delivers trend-based forecasting, capacity modeling, and planning capabilities that enable enterprises to optimize their data infrastructure to improve performance and control costs on premise or in the cloud.

This acquisition is the first since the announcement that Syncsort and Vision Solutions are combining, adding expertise and proven leadership in IBMi and AIX Power Systems platforms and to reinforce its ‘Big Iron to big data’ focus. Syncsort has also long established player in the mainframe business. Its Big Iron to Big Data promises to be a fast-growing market segment comprised of solutions that optimize traditional data systems and deliver mission-critical data from these systems to next-generation analytic environments using innovative Big Data technologies. Metron’s solutions and expertise is expected to contribute to the company’s data infrastructure optimization portfolio.

Syncsort has been on a roll since late in 2016 when, backed by Clearlake, it acquired Trillium Software, a global provider of data quality solutions. The acquisition of Trillium was the largest in Syncsort’s history then, and brings together data quality and data integration technology for enterprise environments. The combination of Syncsort and Trillium, according to the company, enables enterprises to harness all their valuable data assets for greater business insights, applying high-performance and scalable data movement, transformation, profiling, and quality across traditional data management technology stacks as well as Hadoop and cloud environments.

Specifically, Syncsort and Trillium both have a substantial number of large enterprise customers seeking to generate new insights by combining traditional corporate data with diverse information sources from mobile, online, social, and the Internet of Things. Syncsort expects these organizations to continue to rely heavily on next-generation analytic capabilities, creating a growing need for its best-in-class data integration and quality solutions to make their Big Data initiatives successful. Together, Syncsort and Trillium will continue to focus on providing customers with these capabilities for traditional environments, while leading the industry in delivering them for Hadoop and Spark too.

Earlier this year Syncsort integrated its own Big Data integration solution, DMX-h, with Cloudera Director, enabling organizations to easily deploy DMX-h along with Cloudera Enterprise on Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud. By deploying DMX-h with CDH, organizations can quickly pull data into new, ready-to-work clusters in the cloud—accelerating the time to capture cloud benefits, including cost savings and Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) delivery.

“As organizations liberate data from across the enterprise and deliver it into the cloud, they are looking for a self-service, elastic experience that’s easy to deploy and manage. This is a requirement for a variety of use cases – from data archiving to analytics that combine data originating in the cloud with on premise reference data,” said Tendü Yoğurtçu, Chief Technology Officer.

“By integrating DMX-h with Cloudera Director,” Yoğurtçu continued, “DMX-h is instantly available and ready to put enterprise data to work in newly activated cloud clusters.”

Syncsort DMX-h pulls enterprise data into Hadoop in the cloud and prepares that data for business workloads using native Hadoop frameworks, Apache Spark, or MapReduce, effectively enabling IT to achieve time-to-value goals and quickly deliver business insights.

It is always encouraging to see the mainframe eco-system continue to thrive. IBM’s own performance over the past few years has been anything but encouraging.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

CA Technologies Joins System z and Cloud for Cheaper Storage

December 2, 2013

A pair of announcements at the AWS re:Invent conference in mid November aimed to combine System z with the cloud. The first addressed how to unite the z with the cloud through new tools that support storage, virtualized environments, and application delivery for the purpose of  meeting the management demands of what CA refers to as dynamic data centers by blending mainframe and cloud capabilities.

The idea here is to blend the z with cloud infrastructures that offer greater flexibility to manage enterprise data centers and balance workloads across platforms. Citing a Forrester Consulting study commissioned by IBM that noted how organizations, by including the mainframe in cloud infrastructures, can enable a broader mix of infrastructure service options. The idea, for example, is to enable a mix of Linux virtual machines from both the mainframe for data needing to meet high SLAs and from commodity infrastructure when SLA requirements are less stringent. The study also pointed out that the z can better accommodate high densities of very small workloads with resource guarantees — something very difficult to achieve on commodity resources. CA is supporting System z and the cloud with several new software releases that bring improved efficiencies and cost savings.

The second announcement is similar to the first except it looks specifically at cloud storage for the z, particularly when backing up data through Amazon Web Services and Riverbed Technology. The promise here is to streamline storage management operations while cutting storage costs to pennies per gigabyte. Essentially, z shops can use the CA tools to back up their data and archive it very cheaply in the cloud.

CA Cloud Storage for System z, when used with  Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud storage and the Riverbed Whitewater cloud storage appliance enables mainframe data centers greater storage agility at lower storage costs. The upshot: disaster recovery readiness is improved and AWS cloud storage is accessed without changing the existing backup infrastructure.

The product not only lets organizations reduce data storage costs by taking advantage of low cloud storage costs but delivers the elastic capacity and flexibility.  CA also insists the product eliminates purpose-built robots and disks, but that doesn’t seem to be entirely the case.

Rather, it incorporates Riverbed Whitewater, itself a purpose-built storage appliance that helps integrate cloud storage infrastructures to securely deliver instant recovery and cost-effective storage for backup and data archiving. By using CA Cloud Storage for System z and the Riverbed appliance, z shops can back up IBM System z storage data to Amazon S3, a storage infrastructure designed for mission-critical and primary data storage or to Amazon Glacier, an extremely low-cost storage service for which retrieval times of several hours are suitable. Both services are highly secure and scalable and designed for 99.999999999 percent durability, according to CA.

Apparently CA is deploying the software with AWS and Riverbed for itself. The company expects achieve scalable storage while reducing the cost of its own backups. In addition, it picks up the benefits of elastic storage, which should improve its disaster recovery and ensure faster response to business needs without having to depend on offsite tape recalls, according to the company.

Both CA offerings, in effect, blend the System z with the cloud to increase flexibility and reduce cost. “The growth of System z and the increased adoption of Linux on the mainframe make it an optimal platform for reliably and cost-effectively delivering IT services that support opportunities around cloud, big data, and mobile,” said Joe Clabby, president, Clabby Analytics commenting on the CA announcements. In short, he noted the product combination enables IT workers to bridge the IT on-premise/cloud gap and manage the cross-enterprise and cross-platform operations of today’s dynamic data center.

Of course, for z data centers there are other ways to bridge the gap. IBM, for example, has been nudging the z toward to cloud for some time, as DancingDinosaur reported here. IBM also has its own relationship involving the Riverbed Whitewater appliance and Tivoli Storage Manager. Whatever approach you choose, it is time for z shops to explore how they can leverage the cloud.

You can follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.


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