Posts Tagged ‘Arcati’

Arcati 2017 Mainframe Survey—Cognitive a No-Show

February 2, 2017

DancingDinosaur checks into Arcati’s annual mainframe survey every few years. You can access a copy of the 2017 report here.  Some of the data doesn’t change much, a few percentage points here or there. For example, 75% of the respondents consider the mainframe too expensive. OK, people have been saying that for years.

On the other hand, 65% of the respondents’ mainframes are involved with web services. Half also run Java-based mainframe apps, up from 30% last year, while 17% more are planning to run Java with their mainframe this year. Similarly, 35% of respondents report running Linux on the mainframe, up from 22% last year. Again, 13% of the respondents expect to add Linux this year.  Driving this is the advantageous cost and management benefits that result from consolidating distributed Linux workloads on the z. Yes, things are changing.

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The biggest surprise for DancingDinosaur, however, revolved around IBM’s latest strategic initiatives, especially cognitive computing and blockchain.  Other strategic initiatives may include, depending on who is briefing you at the moment—security, data analytics, cloud, hybrid cloud, and mobile. These strategic imperatives, especially cognitive computing, are expected to drive IBM’s revenue. In the latest statement, reported last week in DancingDinosaur, strategic imperatives amounted to 41% of revenue.  Cloud revenue and Cloud-as-a-service also rose considerably, 35% and 61% respectively.

When DancingDinosaur searched the accompanying Arcati vendor report (over 120 vendors with brief descriptions) for cognitive only GT Software came up. IBM didn’t even mention cognitive in its vendor listing, which admittedly was skimpy. The case was the same with Blockchain; only one vendor, Atos, mentioned it and nothing about blockchain in the IBM listing. More vendors, however, noted supporting one or some of the other supposed strategic initiatives.

Overall, the Arcati survey is quite positive about the mainframe. The survey found that 50 percent of sites viewed their mainframe as a legacy system (down from last year’s 62 percent). However, 22 percent (up from 16 percent last year) viewed mainframe as strategic, with 28 percent (up from 22 percent) viewing mainframes as both strategic and legacy.

Reinforcing the value of the mainframe, the survey found 78 percent of sites experienced some kind of increase in capacity. With increased demand for mainframe resources (data and processing), it should not be surprising that respondents report an 81 percent an increase in technology costs. Yet, 38 percent of sites report their people costs have decreased or stayed the same.

Unfortunately, the survey also found that 70 percent of respondents thought there were a cultural barrier between mainframe and other IT professionals. That did not discourage respondents from pointing out the mainframe advantages: 100 percent highlighted the benefit of the mainframe’s availability, 83 percent highlighted security, 75 percent identified scalability, and 71 percent picked manageability as a mainframe benefit.

Also, social media runs on the mainframe. Respondents found social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) useful for their work on the mainframe. Twenty-seven percent report using social (up slightly from 25 percent last year) with the rest not using it at all despite IBM offering Facebook pages dedicated to IMS, CICS, and DB2. DancingDinosaur, only an occasional FB visitor, will check it out and report.

In terms of how mainframes are being used, the Arcati survey found that 25 percent of sites are planning to use Big Data; five percent of sites have adopted it for DevOps while 48 percent are planning to use mainframe DevOps going forward. Similarly, 14 percent of respondents already are reusing APIs while another 41 percent are planning to.

Arcati points out another interesting thought: The survey showed a 55:45 percent split in favor of distributed systems. So, you might expect the spend on the two types of platform to be similar. Yet, the survey found that 87 percent of an organization’s IT spend was going to distributed systems! Apparently mainframes aren’t as expensive as people think. Or put it another way, the cost of owning and operating distributed systems with mainframe-caliber QoS amounts to a lot more than people are admitting.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

State of z System CICS in the Modern Enterprise

March 25, 2016

You should be very familiar with the figures describing the continued strength of mainframe computing in the enterprise today. Seventy percent of enterprise data resides on a mainframe, 71 percent of all Fortune 500 companies run their core businesses on the mainframe, and 92 of the top 100 banks rely on the mainframe to provide at-your-fingertip banking services to the customers (many via mobile).  CICS, according to IBM, handles 1.1 million transactions every second, every day. By comparison, Google handles a mere 59,421 searches every second.

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CICS at IBM Interconnect 2015

H&W, a top mainframe ISV recently released its State of CICS in the Modern Enterprise study. Find a copy of the study here.  For starters, it found that nearly two-thirds on respondents run 51-100% their business-critical applications online through CICS. Within government, 32% of respondents reported running 75-100% of business-critical applications through CICS.

A different study suggests that CICS applications handle more than 30 billion transactions per day and process more than $1 trillion dollars’ worth of business each week. Mainframe data also still drives information systems worldwide. Approximately 60 percent of organizations responding to a 2013 Arcati survey said they manage 40 to 100 percent of their enterprise data on the mainframe.

Integrating legacy systems is a strategy mainframe sites continue to adopt. In fact, 74 percent of respondents in that survey said specifically they are web-enabling CICS subsystems. However, as organizations pursue this strategy, challenges can include unlocking the data, keeping the applications and data available to users, and maintaining data integrity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Nothing new for data center managers about this.

According to the H&W study, online CICS usage has gone up in the last 3 years, from 54% of respondents reporting running over half of their business-crit applications through CICS to 62% in 2015. Hope people will finally stop talking about the mainframe heading toward extinction.

CICS also has carved out a place on the web and with mobile. Sixty-five percent of respondents say at least some of their business-crit applications are available via PC, phone, tablet, and web-based interfaces while 11% more reported plans to mobile- and web-enable their mainframe apps in the future. Thirteen percent reported no plans to do so. Government sector respondents reported that they were significantly more likely to not make the applications available for online access; so much for open government and transparency.

CICS availability proved to raise no concern although a few were concerned with performance. Based on the study results in 2012 some predicted that companies would be moving away from CICS by now. These predictions, apparently, have not come to pass, at least not yet.

In fact, as far as the future of CICS, the technology seems to be facing a remarkably stable outlook for the next 3-5 years. The largest number of respondents, 37%, expected the number of CICS applications to remain the same in that period while 34% said they would be decreasing. More encouragingly, 27% of respondents planned to increase their number of CICS applications accessible online. In the financial services segment, 38% planned to increase the number of online CICS applications while only 10% expected to decrease the number of online applications. Given the demands by banking customers for mobile apps the increase in the number of CICS applications makes perfect sense.

The researchers concluded that CICS continues to play an important role for the majority of mainframe shops surveyed and an increasingly important role for a significant chunk of them.  The respondents also reported that, in general, they were satisfied with CICS performance even in the face of increasingly complex online workloads.

Mainframe CICS may see even more action going forward depending on what companies do with Internet of Things. As with mobile traffic, companies may turn to CICS to handle critical aspects of backend IoT activity, which has the potential to become quite large.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.


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