Posts Tagged ‘Cisco’

IBM Introduces Cloud Private to Hybrid Clouds

November 10, 2017

When you have enough technologies lying around your basement, sometimes you can cobble a few pieces together, mix it with some sexy new stuff and, bingo, you have something that meets a serious need of a number of disparate customers. That’s essentially what IBM did with Cloud Private, which it announced Nov. 1.

IBM staff test Cloud Private automation software

IBM intended Cloud Private to enable companies to create on-premises cloud capabilities similar to public clouds to accelerate app dev. Don’t think it as just old stuff; the new platform is built on the open source Kubernetes-based container architecture and supports both Docker containers and Cloud Foundry. This facilitates integration and portability of workloads, enabling them to evolve to almost any cloud environment, including—especially—the public IBM Cloud.

Also IBM announced container-optimized versions of core enterprise software, including IBM WebSphere Liberty, DB2 and MQ – widely used to run and manage the world’s most business-critical applications and data. This makes it easier to share data and evolve applications as needed across the IBM Cloud, private, public clouds, and other cloud environments with a consistent developer, administrator, and user experience.

Cloud Private amounts to a new software platform, which relies on open source container technology to unlock billions of dollars in core data and applications incorporating legacy software like WebSphere and Db2. The purpose is to extend cloud-native tools across public and private clouds. For z data centers that have tons of valuable, reliable working systems years away from being retired, if ever, Cloud Private may be just what they need.

Almost all enterprise systems vendors are trying to do the same hybrid cloud computing enablement. HPE, Microsoft, Cisco, which is partnering with Google on this, and more. This is a clear indication that the cloud and especially the hybrid cloud is crossing the proverbial chasm. In years past IT managers and C-level executives didn’t want anything to do with the cloud; the IT folks saw it as a threat to their on premises data center and the C-suite was scared witless about security.

Those issues haven’t gone away although the advent of hybrid clouds have mitigated some of the fears among both groups. Similarly, the natural evolution of the cloud and advances in hybrid cloud computing make this more practical.

The private cloud too is growing. According to IBM, while public cloud adoption continues to grow at a rapid pace, organizations, especially in regulated industries of finance and health care, are continuing to leverage private clouds as part of their journey to public cloud environments to quickly launch and update applications. This also is what is driving hybrid clouds. IBM estimates companies will spend more than $50 billion globally starting in 2017 to create and evolve private clouds with growth rates of 15 to 20 percent a year through 2020, according to IBM market projections.

The problem facing IBM and the other enterprise systems vendors scrambling for hybrid clouds is how to transition legacy systems into cloud native systems. The hybrid cloud in effect acts as facilitating middleware. “Innovation and adoption of public cloud services has been constrained by the challenge of transitioning complex enterprise systems and applications into a true cloud-native environment,” said Arvind Krishna, Senior Vice President for IBM Hybrid Cloud and Director of IBM Research. IBM’s response is Cloud Private, which brings rapid application development and modernization to existing IT infrastructure while combining it with the service of a public cloud platform.

Hertz adopted this approach. “Private cloud is a must for many enterprises such as ours working to reduce or eliminate their dependence on internal data centers,” said Tyler Best, Hertz Chief Information Officer.  A strategy consisting of public, private and hybrid cloud is essential for large enterprises to effectively make the transition from legacy systems to cloud.

IBM is serious about cloud as a strategic initiative. Although not as large as Microsoft Azure or Amazon Web Service (AWS) in the public cloud, a recent report by Synergy Research found that IBM is a major provider of private cloud services, making the company the third-largest overall cloud provider.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Variety of System Vendors at IBM Edge2015

May 7, 2015

An interesting set of vendor sponsors and exhibitors are lined up for IBM Edge2015 in Las Vegas next week. For the past weeks DancingDinosaur has focused on a small selection of program sessions.  Now let’s take a look at some of the vendors that will be there.

DancingDinosaur loves the vendors because they’re usually the ones underwriting the free entertainment, food, and drinks as well as giving out the nifty stuff. (My daughters used to love going off to school with what they considered cool multi-colored pens, Day-Glo bouncing balls, folding Frisbees, and more, which I picked up free at different vendors’ booths.)

ibm enterprise cloud - cloud breakthrough year infographic_12-17-14b (1)

IBM enterprise cloud platform (click to enlarge)

Let’s start with Rocket Software. DancingDinosaur thinks of them mainly as a mainframe software provider with products for data management, performance optimization, catalog and system management, disaster recovery, storage management, and security. They also offer a bunch of interesting free utilities. At the end of April Rocket announced Rocket Discover, a self-service, intuitive data preparation and discovery solution to lets business managers and executives easily access, manipulate, prepare, and visualize data.

Both Brocade and Cisco will be there. In April, for instance, Brocade announced innovations for its campus LAN switch family. The switch is intended to help organization easily scale to meet increasing campus bandwidth demands. For instance it will deliver the industry’s highest 10 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) port density for any switch in its class to accommodate what it refers to as the onslaught of user video and wireless traffic that is taxing campus networks.

In early May Cisco announced that Eletrobras, a Brazilian electric utility, would use Cisco’s technology for a smart metering initiative.  The project is expected to enable operational efficiency by improving service quality and control of non-technical losses, which, according to the company, reach 22% in the North and 10% in the Northeast of Brazil compared to required energy.

Of course Red Hat and SUSE, currently the leading Linux providers for the mainframe, will be there. DancingDinosaur has gotten some of his favorite baseball hats from each of these companies at previous IBM Edge conferences.

Red Hat introduced a new business resource planner as part of the latest releases of Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite and Red Hat JBoss BRMS. The planner, based on the open source OptaPlanner JBoss community project, is designed to help enterprises address complex scheduling and resource planning challenges. It also promises to increase operational adaptability in the face of rapidly changing and unpredictable business environments.

In late April SUSE announced the upcoming availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12. New features, such as full operating system rollback, live kernel patching, and installation automation, should help simplify deployment and can increase uptime of mission-critical SAP solution-based workloads on Linux. SUSE customers should save time and resources as they experience improved performance and reliability.

Since the topic is Linux, let’s not forget Canonical’s Ubuntu, usually regarded as a desktop Linux distribution, is moving onto server platforms. At present Ubuntu is supported on POWER8 but not z. Ubuntu is included in numerous program sessions at Edge2015. For example, Ubuntu on Power – Using PowerKVM, presented by James Nash. The session covers various aspects to consider when moving to Ubuntu on the Power platform running in a PowerKVM environment.

In the exhibition area, where most people congregate for free food and drink after the program sessions there are over 30 exhibitors, including a handful of IBM units. For example, H&W Computer Systems  provides a handful of mainframe tools that enable you to run batch jobs during the business day without impacting CICS, automatically convert JES2 output to PDF or other formats, or use ISPF-like features to manage mainframe datasets. This is hardcore mainframe stuff.

An interesting exhibitor is ownCloud, an enterprise file sync and share system that is hosted in your data center, on your servers, using your storage. ownCloud provides Universal File Access through a single front-end to all of your disparate systems. Users can access company files on any device, anytime, from anywhere while IT can manage, control and audit file sharing activity to ensure security and compliance measures are met. (DancingDinosaur could actually use something like this—make note to check out this exhibitor.)

Recommend you spend a couple of late afternoons grazing through the exhibitor space, enjoying the food and drink, catching some demos, and collecting a new wardrobe of t-shirts and baseball caps.  And don’t forget to pick up some of the other funky stuff for your kids.

Of course, plan to save time for the free evening entertainment. In addition to Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians, and rocker Grace Potter, here. Also there will be a weird but terrific group, 2Cellos as well.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. If you are attending IBM Edge2015—now sold out—please look for me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices.


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