Posts Tagged ‘Docker containers’

IBM Introduces Cloud Private to Hybrid Clouds

November 10, 2017

When you have enough technologies lying around your basement, sometimes you can cobble a few pieces together, mix it with some sexy new stuff and, bingo, you have something that meets a serious need of a number of disparate customers. That’s essentially what IBM did with Cloud Private, which it announced Nov. 1.

IBM staff test Cloud Private automation software

IBM intended Cloud Private to enable companies to create on-premises cloud capabilities similar to public clouds to accelerate app dev. Don’t think it as just old stuff; the new platform is built on the open source Kubernetes-based container architecture and supports both Docker containers and Cloud Foundry. This facilitates integration and portability of workloads, enabling them to evolve to almost any cloud environment, including—especially—the public IBM Cloud.

Also IBM announced container-optimized versions of core enterprise software, including IBM WebSphere Liberty, DB2 and MQ – widely used to run and manage the world’s most business-critical applications and data. This makes it easier to share data and evolve applications as needed across the IBM Cloud, private, public clouds, and other cloud environments with a consistent developer, administrator, and user experience.

Cloud Private amounts to a new software platform, which relies on open source container technology to unlock billions of dollars in core data and applications incorporating legacy software like WebSphere and Db2. The purpose is to extend cloud-native tools across public and private clouds. For z data centers that have tons of valuable, reliable working systems years away from being retired, if ever, Cloud Private may be just what they need.

Almost all enterprise systems vendors are trying to do the same hybrid cloud computing enablement. HPE, Microsoft, Cisco, which is partnering with Google on this, and more. This is a clear indication that the cloud and especially the hybrid cloud is crossing the proverbial chasm. In years past IT managers and C-level executives didn’t want anything to do with the cloud; the IT folks saw it as a threat to their on premises data center and the C-suite was scared witless about security.

Those issues haven’t gone away although the advent of hybrid clouds have mitigated some of the fears among both groups. Similarly, the natural evolution of the cloud and advances in hybrid cloud computing make this more practical.

The private cloud too is growing. According to IBM, while public cloud adoption continues to grow at a rapid pace, organizations, especially in regulated industries of finance and health care, are continuing to leverage private clouds as part of their journey to public cloud environments to quickly launch and update applications. This also is what is driving hybrid clouds. IBM estimates companies will spend more than $50 billion globally starting in 2017 to create and evolve private clouds with growth rates of 15 to 20 percent a year through 2020, according to IBM market projections.

The problem facing IBM and the other enterprise systems vendors scrambling for hybrid clouds is how to transition legacy systems into cloud native systems. The hybrid cloud in effect acts as facilitating middleware. “Innovation and adoption of public cloud services has been constrained by the challenge of transitioning complex enterprise systems and applications into a true cloud-native environment,” said Arvind Krishna, Senior Vice President for IBM Hybrid Cloud and Director of IBM Research. IBM’s response is Cloud Private, which brings rapid application development and modernization to existing IT infrastructure while combining it with the service of a public cloud platform.

Hertz adopted this approach. “Private cloud is a must for many enterprises such as ours working to reduce or eliminate their dependence on internal data centers,” said Tyler Best, Hertz Chief Information Officer.  A strategy consisting of public, private and hybrid cloud is essential for large enterprises to effectively make the transition from legacy systems to cloud.

IBM is serious about cloud as a strategic initiative. Although not as large as Microsoft Azure or Amazon Web Service (AWS) in the public cloud, a recent report by Synergy Research found that IBM is a major provider of private cloud services, making the company the third-largest overall cloud provider.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

New Software Pricing for IBM Z

July 27, 2017

One of the often overlooked benefits of the introduction of a new mainframe like the Z is cost savings. Even though the machine may cost more, the cost of the performance and capabilities it delivers typically cost less on a per unit basis. In the case of the new Z, it’s not just a modest drop in price/performance. With the new Z, IBM announced, three new Container Pricing models for IBM Z, providing greatly simplified software pricing that promises flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments.

Working on the new IBM Z

Here are the three biggest software pricing changes:

  • Predictable and Transparent Container Pricing—providing organizations greatly simplified software pricing that combines flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments. To IBM, a container can be any address space, however large and small. You can have any number of containers. “Container Pricing provides collocated workloads with line-of-sight pricing to a solution,” explained Ray Jones, VP, IBM Z Software and Hybrid Cloud. With container pricing, Jones continued, “the client determines where to deploy using WLM, z/OS and SCRT do the rest.”
  • Application dev and test—highly competitive stand-alone pricing for z/OS based development and test workloads. Organizations can increase their DevTest capacity up to 3 times at no additional MLC cost. This will be based on the organization’s existing DevTest workload size. Or a company can choose the multiplier it wants and set the reference point for both MLC and OTC software.
  • Payment systems pricing are based on the business metric of payments volume a bank processes, not the available capacity. This gives organizations much greater flexibility to innovate affordably in a competitive environment, particularly in the fast-growing Instant Payment segment. To use the new per payment pricing, Jones added, up front licensing of IBM Financial Transaction Manager (FTM) software is required.

The Container Pricing options are designed to give clients the predictability and transparency they require for their business. The pricing models are scalable both within and across logical partitions (LPARs) and deliver greatly enhanced metering, capping and billing capabilities. Container Pricing for IBM Z is planned to be available by year-end 2017 and enabled in z/OS V2.2 and z/OS V2.3

Jones introduced the software discounts by reiterating that this was focused on software container pricing for IBM z and promised that there will be a technology software benefit with z14 as there was with the z13. IBM, he added, will offer a way to migrate to the new pricing, “This is a beginning of a new beginning. Clearly as we go forward we want to expand what’s applicable to container pricing.” His clear implication: IBM is intent on expanding the discounting it started when, several years ago, it introduced discounts for mobile transactions running on the z, which was driving up monthly software cost averages as mobile transaction volume began to skyrocket.

To understand the latest changes you need to appreciate what IBM means by container. This is not just about Docker containers. A container to IBM simply is an address space.  An organization can have multiple containers in a logical partition and have as many containers as it wants and change the size of containers as needed.

The fundamental advantage of IBM’s container pricing is that it enables co-location of workloads to get improved performance and remove latency, thus IBM’s repeated references to line-of-sight pricing. In short, this is about MLC (4hr) pricing. The new pricing eliminates what goes on in container from consideration. The price of container is just that; the price of the container. It won’t impact the 4hr rolling average, resulting in very predictable pricing.

The benefits are straightforward: simplified pricing for qualified solutions and allowance to deploy in the best way. And IBM can price competitively to the customer’s solution; in effect solution-specific pricing. When combined with the new price metric-payments pricing IBM trying to put together a competitive cost/price story. Of course, it is all predicated on the actual prices IBM finally publishes.  Let’s hope they are as competitive as IBM implies.

DancingDinosaur never passes up an opportunity to flog IBM for overpricing its systems and services. From discussions with Jones and other IBM during the pre-launch briefings managers the company may finally understand the need to make the mainframe or z or Z or whatever IBM calls it price-competitive on an operational level today. Low TCO or low cost of IOPS or low cost of QoS is not the same.

This is especially important now. Managers everywhere appear to be waking up to the need transform their mainframe-based businesses, at least in part, by becoming competitive digital businesses. DancingDinosaur never imagined that he would post something referencing the mainframe as a cost-competitive system able to rival x86 systems not just on quality of service but on cost. With the IBM Z the company is talking about competing with an aggressive cost strategy. It’s up to you, paying customers, to force them to deliver.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Spotlights Blockchain and Hyperledger Fabric at IBM InterCONNECT

March 23, 2017

IBM announced earlier this week Hyperledger Fabric v 1.0 beta, with security for regulated industries, governance tools, and over 1,000 transactions per second possible.  This is represents the first enterprise-ready blockchain service based on the Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Fabric version 1.0. The service enables developers to quickly build and host security-rich production blockchain networks on the IBM Cloud and underpinned by IBM LinuxONE.

Maersk and IBM transform global trade with blockchain

LinuxONE, a dedicated z-based Linux system with as much security as any commercial platform is likely to have, should play a central role in blockchain networks. The machine also delivers all the itys the z is renowned for: scalability, availability, flexibility, manageability, and more.

The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 is being developed by members of the Hyperledger consortium alongside other open source blockchain technologies. The Hyperledger consortium’s Technical Steering Committee recently promoted Fabric from incubator to active state, and it is expected to be available in the coming weeks. It is designed to provide a framework for enterprise-grade blockchain networks that can transact at over 1,000 transactions per second.

Safety and security is everything with blockchain, which means blockchain networks are only as safe as the infrastructures on which they reside, hence the underpinning on LinuxONE. In addition, IBM’s High Security Business Network brings an extremely secure Linux infrastructure that, according to IBM, integrates security from the hardware up through the software stack, specifically designed for enterprise blockchains by providing:

  • Protection from insider attacks – helps safeguard entry points on the network and fight insider threats from anyone with system administrator credentials
  • The industry’s highest certified level of isolation for a commercial system- Evaluation Assurance Level certification of EAL5+ is critical in highly regulated industries such as government, financial services and healthcare, to prevent the leakage of information from one party’s environment to another
  • Secure Service Containers – to help protect code throughout the blockchain application and effectively encapsulating the blockchain into a virtual appliance, denying access even to privileged users
  • Tamper-responsive hardware security modules –to protect encrypted data for storage of cryptographic keys. These modules are certified to FIPS 140-2 Level 4, the highest level of security certification available for cryptographic modules
  • A highly auditable operating environment – comprehensive , immutable log data supports forensics, audit, and compliance

IBM also announced today the first commercially available blockchain governance tools, and new open-source developer tools that automate the steps it takes to build with the Hyperledger Fabric, reportedly speeding the process from weeks to days.

The new blockchain governance tools also make it easy to set up a blockchain network and assign roles and levels of visibility from a single dashboard. They help network members set rules, manage membership, and enforce network compliance once the network is up and running.

This seems straightforward enough. Once setup is initiated, members can determine the rules of the blockchain and share consent when new members request to join the network. In addition, the deployment tool assigns each network a Network Trust Rating of 1 to 100. New network members can view this before joining and determine whether or not they can trust the network enough to participate. Organizations can also take steps to improve their Trust Ratings before moving into production.

To make it easier for developers to translate business needs from concept to actual code, IBM Blockchain includes a new open-source developer tools for the Hyperledger Fabric called Fabric Composer. Fabric Composer promises to help users model business networks, create APIs that integrate with the blockchain network and existing systems of record, and quickly build a user interface. Fabric Composer also automates tasks that traditionally could take weeks, allowing developers to complete them in minutes instead.

IBM Blockchain for Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 is now available through a beta program on IBM Bluemix. Hyperledger Fabric also is available on Docker Hub as an IBM-certified image available for download at no cost.

At this point, IBM has over 25 publicly named Blockchain projects underway. They address everything from carbon asset management to consumer digital ID, post trade derivatives processing, last mile shipping, supply chain food safety, provenance, securities lending, and more seemingly are being added nearly weekly.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Docker on IBM z System

January 7, 2016

“If you want Docker on z, you can do it in next to 30 seconds, says Dale Hoffman,Program Director, Linux SW Ecosystem & Innovation Lab.  At least if you’re running Linux on z and preferably on a LinuxONE z.  With all the work Hoffman’s team has done laying the ground work for Docker on the z, you barely have to do anything yourself.

HybridCloud_Infographic (3)

Containers are ideal for cloud computing or, more importantly, for hybrid clouds, defined as the connection of one or more clouds to other clouds. Hybrid clouds are where IBM sees the industry and the z going, and containers, particularly Docker containers, have emerged as the vehicle to get enterprises there. Click here for an FAQ on Docker with z.

z System shops can get there fast using tools Hoffman’s group has already built for the z. To get started, just click here. Or, simply go to IBM Bluemix, from which you can build and deploy Docker containers for the z and other platforms. Back in June IBM introduced enterprise class containers that make it easier for developers to deliver production applications across their hybrid environments.

IBM also offers its own IBM branded containers that allow organizations to deploy, manage, and run application components on the IBM Bluemix development platform by leveraging the open-source Docker container technology. IBM Bluemix now offers three infrastructure compute technology choices to deploy applications – Docker containers, OpenStack virtual machines, or Cloud Foundry apps. Designed for enterprise production workloads, IBM Containers can be securely deployed with integrated scalability and reliability, which enterprise customers rely upon.

In keeping with IBM’s policy of not going it alone, the company also has become a founding member of a coalition of partners and users to create the Open Container Platform (OCP) that aims to ensure containers are interoperable. Features of the IBM Containers include integrated tools such as log analytics, performance monitoring and delivery pipeline, elastic scaling, zero downtime deployments, automated image security/vulnerability scanning, and access to Bluemix’s catalog of over 100 cloud services including Watson, Analytics, IoT and Mobile.

Enterprise z shops want containers because they need to be as fast and agile as the born-in-the-cloud upstarts challenge them. Think survival. Containers like Docker really provide ease of use, portability, and fast deployment almost anywhere to get new applications into production fast. Through containers Docker basically puts its engine/runtime on top of the OS and provides the virtual containers to deploy software into the container. The appeal of this is easy portability for the application/software to any Docker container anywhere and fast deployment.

Specifically the Docker technology provides application portability by utilizing open-source, standardized, light-weight, and self-sufficient container capabilities. IBM’s implementation of the Docker technology with enterprise capabilities further strengthens IBM’s support for hybrid cloud environments. Of course, not every application at every stage in its lifecycle will run in the public cloud—many if not most won’t ever–but IBM Containers enables the developers to determine when to run containers on premise and when to deploy to the public cloud on IBM Bluemix with full Internet connectivity. Image files created within IBM Containers support portability and can be instantiated as containers on any infrastructure that runs Docker.

Through the use of containers on z you can shape your environment using system virtualization and container elements according to your landscape and your requirements with hardly any constraints in performance.  In addition, Docker on z provides greater business agility to go to market quicker and solve business problems effectively through DevOps agility via Docker containers and microservices. Then add hybrid cloud and portability by which you move the same application across multiple clouds.   In short, you can define your IT structures according to your needs, not your system constraints.

Finally, there is nothing threatening about Docker containers on z. Docker is Docker is Docker, even on z, says Hoffman; it relies on the same container technology of Linux, which has been available on z for many years. So get started with containers on z and let DancingDinosaur know when you have success deploying your z containers.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.


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