Posts Tagged ‘EasyTier’

New IBM Flash Storage for the Mainframe

June 2, 2014

IBM is serious about flash storage and they are enabling just about everything for flash—the DS8000 family, San Volume Controller, EasyTier, Real-time Compression (RtC), and more.  Of particular interest to DancingDinosaur readers should be the recently announced DS8870 all flash enclosure.

Storage in general is changing fast. Riding Moore’s Law for the past two decades, storage users could assume annual drops in the cost per gigabyte. It was as predictable as passing go in Monopoly and collecting $200. But with that ride coming to an end companies like IBM are looking elsewhere to engineer the continued improvements everyone assumed and benefited from. For example, IBM is combining SVC, RtC, and flash to get significantly more performance out of less actual storage capacity.

The DS8870 is particularly interesting. In terms of reliability, for instance, it delivers not five-nines (99.999%) availability but six-nines (99.9999%) availability. That works out to be about 30 seconds of downtime each year. It works with all IBM servers, not just the z, and it protects data through full disk encryption and advanced access control. With the new flash enclosure packed with IBM’s enhanced flash the DS8870 delivers 4x faster flash performance in 50% less space. That translates into a 3.2x improvement in database performance.

Flash is not cheap when viewed through the traditional cost/gigabyte metric, but the above performance data suggests a different way to gauge the cost of flash, which continues to steadily fall in price. The 3.2x increase in database performance, for example, means you can handle over 300% more transactions.

Let’s start with the assumption that more transactions ultimately translate into more revenue. The same for that extra 9 in availability. The high-performance all flash DS8870 configuration with the High Performance Flash Enclosure also reduces the footprint by 50% and reduces power consumption by 12%, which means lower space and energy costs. It also enables you to shrink batch times by 10%, according to IBM. DancingDinosaur will be happy to help you pull together a TCO analysis for an all-flash DS8870 investment.

The sheer specs of the new system are impressive. IBM reports the product’s up to 8 PCIe enclosures populated with 400 GB flash cards provides 73.6TB of usable capacity. For I/O capacity the 8 I/O bays installed in the base frame provide up to 128 8Gb FC ports. Depending on the internal server you install in the DS8870 you can also get up to 1TB of cache.

all flash rack enclosure

all flash rack enclosure

ds8870 rack

The Flash Enclosure itself is a 1U drawer that can take up to 30 flash cards.  By opting for thirty 400GB flash cards you will end up with 9.2TB Usable (12 TB raw). Since the high-performance all flash DS8870 can take up to 8 Flash Enclosures you can get 96TB raw (73.6TB usable) flash capacity per system.

A hybrid DS8870 system, as opposed to the high-performance all flash version, will allow up to 120 Flash cards in 4 Flash Enclosures for 48TB raw (36.8TB usable), along with 1536 2.5” HDDs/SSDs. Then, connect it all to the DS8870 internal PCIe fabric for impressive performance— 200,000 IOPS (100% read) and 130,000 IOPS (100% write). From there, you can connect it to flash-enabled SVC and Easy Tier.

Later this year, reports Clod Barrera, IBM’s storage CTO, you will be able to add 4 more enclosures in hybrid configurations for boosting flash capacity up to 96TB raw.  Together you can combine the DS8870, flash, SVC, RtC, and EasyTier for a lightning fast and efficient storage infrastructure.

Even the most traditional System z shop will soon find itself confronting mixed workloads consisting of traditional and non-traditional workload. You probably already are as mobile devices initiate requests for mainframe data. Pretty soon you will be faced with incorporating traditional and new workloads. When that happens you will want a fast, efficient, flexible infrastructure like the DS8870.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him onTwitter, @mainframeblog

IBM Edge2014: It’s All About the Storage

May 22, 2014

When your blogger as a newbie programmer published his first desktop application in the pre-historic desktop computing era it had to be distributed on consumer tape cassette. When buyers complained that it didn’t work the problem was quickly traced to imprecise and inconsistent consumer cassette storage. Since the dawn of the computer era, it has always been about storage.

It still is. Almost every session at IBM Edge2014 seemed to touch on storage in one way or another.  Kicking it all off was Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President,  IBM Systems & Technology Group, who elaborated on IBM’s main theme not just for Edge2014 but for IBM at large: Infrastructure Matters Because Business Outcomes Matter. And by infrastructure IBM mainly is referring to storage. Almost every session, whether on cloud or analytics or mobile, touched on storage in one way or another.

To reinforce his infrastructure matters point Rosamilia cited a recent IBM study showing that 70% of top executives now recognize infrastructure as an enabler. However, just 10% reported their infrastructure was ready for the challenge.  As an interesting aside, the study found 91% of the respondents’ customer facing applications were using the System z, which only emphasizes another theme at IBM Edge2014—that companies need to connect systems of record with systems of engagement if they want to be successful.

In fact, IBM wants to speed up computing overall, starting with flash and storage. A study by the Aberdeen Group found that a 1 sec. delay in page load resulted in a 77% loss in conversions, 11% fewer page views, and a 16% decrease in customer satisfaction.  IBM’s conclusion: In dollar terms, this means that if your site typically earns $100,000 a day, this year you could lose $2.5 million in sales.  Expect all IBM storage to be enabled for some form of flash going forward.

First announced at IBM Edge2014 were the FlashSystem 840 and the IBM FlashSystem V840, which includes integrated data virtualization through IBM’s SVC and its various components. It also boasts a more powerful controller capable of rich capabilities like compression, replication, tiering, thin provisioning, and more. Check out the details here.

Also at Edge2014 there was considerable talk about Elastic Storage. This is the storage you have always imagined. You can manage mixed storage pools of any device. Integrate with any OS. Write policies to it. It seems infinitely scalable. Acts as a universal cloud gateway. And even works with tape.

Sounds magical doesn’t it?  According to IBM, Elastic Storage provides automated tiering to move data from different storage media types. Infrequently accessed files can be migrated to tape and automatically recalled back to disk when required—sounds like EasyTier built in. Unlike traditional storage, it allows you to smoothly grow or shrink your storage infrastructure without application disruption or outages. And it can run on a cluster of x86 and POWER-based servers and can be used with internal disk, commodity storage, or advanced storage systems from IBM or other vendors. Half the speakers at the conference glowed about Elastic Storage.  Obviously it exists, but it is not an actually named product yet. Watch for it, but it is going to have a different name when finally released, probably later this year. No hint at what that name will be.

IBM, at the conference, identified the enhanced XIV as the ideal cloud infrastructure. XIV eliminates complexity. It enables high levels of resiliency and ensures service levels. As one speaker said: “It populates LUNs and spreads the workload evenly. You don’t even have to load balance it.” Basically, it is grid storage that is ideal for the cloud.

LTFS (Linear Tape File System) was another storage technology that came up surprisingly frequently. Don’t assume that that tape has no future, not judging from IBM Edge2014. LTFS provides a GUI that enables you to automatically move infrequently accessed data from disk to tape without the need for proprietary tape applications. Implementing LTFS Enterprise Edition allows you to replace disk with tape for tiered storage and lower your storage TCO by over 50%. Jon Toigo, a leading storage analyst, has some good numbers on tape economics that may surprise you.

Another sometimes overlooked technology is EasyTier, IBM’s storage tiering tool.  EasyTier has evolved into a main way for IBM storage users to capitalize on the benefits of Flash. EasyTier already has emerged as an effective tool for both the DS8000 and the Storwize V7000.  With EasyTier small amounts of Flash can deliver big performance improvements.

In the coming weeks DancingDinosaur will look at other IBM Edge 2014 topics.  It also is time to start thinking about IBM Enterprise 2014, which combines the System z and Power platforms. It will be at the Venetian in Las Vegas, Oct 6-10. IBM Enterprise 2014 is being billed as the premier enterprise infrastructure event.

BTW, we never effectively solved the challenge of distributing desktop programs until the industry came out with 5.5” floppy disks. Years later my children used the unsold floppies as little Frisbees.

Follow Alan Radding and DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

IBM Edge2014 as Coming out Party for OpenStack

May 7, 2014

IBM didn’t invent OpenStack (Rackspace and NASA did), but IBM’s embrace of OpenStack in March 2013 as its standard for cloud computing made it a legit standard for enterprise computing. Since then IBM has made its intention to enable its product line, from the System z on down, for the OpenStack set of open source technologies.  Judging from the number of sessions at IBM Edge 2014, (Las Vegas, May 19-23 at the Venetian) that address one or another aspect of OpenStack you might think of IBM Edge2014 almost as a coming out celebration for OpenStack and enterprise cloud computing.

OpenStack is a collection of open source technologies. the goal of which is to provide a scalable computing infrastructure for both public and private clouds. As such it has become the foundation of IBM’s cloud strategy, which is another way of saying it has become what IBM sees as its future. An excellent mini-tutorial on OpenStack, IBM, and the System z can be found at mainframe-watch-Belgium here.

At IBM Edge2014 OpenStack is frequently included in sessions on storage, cloud, and storage management.  Let’s take a closer look at a few of those sessions.

IBM Storage and Cloud Technologies

Presenter Christopher Vollmar offers an overview of the IBM storage platforms that contain cloud technologies or provide a foundation for creating a private storage cloud for block and file workloads. This overview includes IBM’s SmartCloud Virtual Storage Center, SmartCloud Storage Access, Active Cloud Engine, and XIV’s Hyper-Scale as well as IBM storage products’ integration with OpenStack.

OpenStack and IBM Storage

Presenters Michael Factor and Funda Eceral explain how OpenStack is rapidly emerging as the de facto platform for Infrastructure as a Service. IBM is working fast to pin down the integration of its storage products with OpenStack. This talk presents a high level overview of OpenStack, with a focus on Cinder, the OpenStack block storage manager. They also will explain how IBM is leading the evolution of Cinder by improving the common base with features such as volume migration and ability to change the SLAs associated with the volume in the OpenStack cloud. Already IBM storage products—Storwize, XIV, DS8000, GPFS and TSM—are integrated with OpenStack, enabling self-provisioning access to features such as EasyTier or Real-time Compression via standard OpenStack interfaces. Eventually, you should expect virtually all IBM products, capabilities, and services to work with and through OpenStack.

IBM XIV and VMware: Best Practices for Your Cloud

Presenters Peter Kisich, Carlos Lizarralde argue that IBM Storage continues to lead in OpenStack integration and development. They then introduce the core services of OpenStack while focusing on how IBM storage provides open source integration with Cinder drivers for Storwize, DS8000 and XIV. They also include key examples and a demonstration of the automation and management IBM Storage offers through the OpenStack cloud platform.

IBM OpenStack Hybrid Cloud on IBM PureFlex and SoftLayer

Presenter Eric Kern explains how IBM’s latest version of OpenStack is used to showcase a hybrid cloud environment. A pair of SoftLayer servers running in IBM’s public cloud are matched with a PureFlex environment locally hosting the OpenStack controller. He covers the architecture used to set up this environment before diving into the details around deploying workloads.

Even if you never get to IBM Edge2014 it should be increasingly clear that OpenStack is quickly gaining traction and destined to emerge as central to Enterprise IT, any style of cloud computing, and IBM. OpenStack will be essential for any private, public, and hybrid cloud deployments. Come to Edge2014 and get up to speed fast on OpenStack.

Alan Radding/DancingDinosaur will be there. Look for me in the bloggers lounge between and after sessions. Also watch for upcoming posts on DancingDinosaur about OpenStack and the System z and on OpenStack on Power Systems.

Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.


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