Posts Tagged ‘Enterprise 2014’

Expanding Mainframe Linux and Cloud Computing

June 9, 2014

In case you wondered if IBM is seriously committed to both mainframe Linux and cloud computing on the System z platform you need only look at the June 2 announcement that the company is opening the first dedicated System z Linux and cloud computing competency center in Beijing.  According to the announcement, the new center is specifically intended to help organizations there take advantage of Linux and cloud computing solutions on the mainframe, and help accelerate adoption of Linux on System z in China.

This is just the most recent of a number of developments that boosted the System z profile. Even at the recent IBM Edge 2014 conference, which was not about the System z at all (a System z and Power conference, Enterprise 2014, is coming up in October) still managed to slip in some System z sessions and content, including one about protecting DB2 data on z/OS using tape and other sessions that included the System z and Power enterprise servers in discussions on various aspects of cloud computing or the use of flash.

Following the Mainframe50 announcement earlier in the spring, IBM introduced more System z enhancements including the IBM Enterprise Cloud System, an OpenStack-based converged offering that includes compute, storage, software, and services and built around the zBC12; IBM Wave for z/VM, which simplifies z/VM virtualization management and expedites an organization’s path to the cloud; and a new IBM Cloud Management Suite for System z, which handles dynamic provisioning and performance monitoring.

An interesting aspect of this announcement is the IBM’s focus on Linux. It has taken a decade for Linux to gain traction in System z data centers but patience is finally paying off.  Linux has proven instrumental in bringing new mainframe users to the platform (DancingDinosuar previously reported on Algar, a Brazilian telco) ; according to IBM, more than 50% of all new mainframe accounts since 2010 run Linux. To that end, DancingDinosaur has long recommended the Enterprise Linux Server Solution Edition program, a deeply discounted package hardware, middleware, and software. It represents the best and maybe the only bargain IBM regularly offers.

Linux itself has proven remarkably robust and has achieved widespread acceptance among enterprises running a variety of platforms. According to the IDC, Linux server demand is rising due to demand from cloud infrastructure deployments. The researcher expects that demand to continue into the future. In the first quarter of 2014, Linux server revenue accounted for 30 percent of overall server revenue, an increase of 15.4 percent.

Along with cloud computing, collaborative development appears to be contributing to the continued growth and adoption of Linux. According to the Linux Foundation, a new business model has emerged in which companies are joining together across industries to share development resources and build common open source code bases on which they can differentiate their own products and services. This collaborative approach promises to transform a number of industries, especially those involved with cloud computing, social and mobile. Apparently it provides a fast way to create the next generation of technology products.

In its latest survey, the Linux Foundation identified three drivers or the recent Linux growth:

  1. Collaborative software development—ninety-one percent of business managers and executives surveyed ruled collaborative software development somewhat to very important to their business while nearly 80 percent say collaborative development practices have been seen as more strategic to their organization over the past three years.
  2. Growing investments in collaborative software development—44 percent of business managers said they would increase their investments in collaborative software development in the next six months
  3. The benefits of collaboration—more than 77 percent of managers said collaborative development practices have benefited their organizations through a shorter product development cycle/faster time to market.

The bulk of the world’s critical transaction processing and production data continue to reside on the mainframe, around 70 percent, according to IBM. Similarly, 71% of all Fortune 500 companies have their core businesses on a mainframe. And this has remained remarkably steady over the past decade despite the rise of cloud computing. Of course, all these organizations have extensive multi-platform data centers and are adding growing numbers of on-premise and increasingly hybrid cloud systems.

Far from relying on its core production processing to carry the mainframe forever, the new Beijing mainframe Linux-cloud center demonstrates IBM’s intent to advance the mainframe platform in new markets. It is opening the mainframe up in a variety of ways; from z/OS in the cloud to Hadoop for z to new cloud-like pay-for-use pricing models. Watch DancingDinosaur for an upcoming post on the new pricing discounts for mobile transactions on z/OS.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding and can be followed on Twitter, @mainframeblog

IBM Edge2014: It’s All About the Storage

May 22, 2014

When your blogger as a newbie programmer published his first desktop application in the pre-historic desktop computing era it had to be distributed on consumer tape cassette. When buyers complained that it didn’t work the problem was quickly traced to imprecise and inconsistent consumer cassette storage. Since the dawn of the computer era, it has always been about storage.

It still is. Almost every session at IBM Edge2014 seemed to touch on storage in one way or another.  Kicking it all off was Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President,  IBM Systems & Technology Group, who elaborated on IBM’s main theme not just for Edge2014 but for IBM at large: Infrastructure Matters Because Business Outcomes Matter. And by infrastructure IBM mainly is referring to storage. Almost every session, whether on cloud or analytics or mobile, touched on storage in one way or another.

To reinforce his infrastructure matters point Rosamilia cited a recent IBM study showing that 70% of top executives now recognize infrastructure as an enabler. However, just 10% reported their infrastructure was ready for the challenge.  As an interesting aside, the study found 91% of the respondents’ customer facing applications were using the System z, which only emphasizes another theme at IBM Edge2014—that companies need to connect systems of record with systems of engagement if they want to be successful.

In fact, IBM wants to speed up computing overall, starting with flash and storage. A study by the Aberdeen Group found that a 1 sec. delay in page load resulted in a 77% loss in conversions, 11% fewer page views, and a 16% decrease in customer satisfaction.  IBM’s conclusion: In dollar terms, this means that if your site typically earns $100,000 a day, this year you could lose $2.5 million in sales.  Expect all IBM storage to be enabled for some form of flash going forward.

First announced at IBM Edge2014 were the FlashSystem 840 and the IBM FlashSystem V840, which includes integrated data virtualization through IBM’s SVC and its various components. It also boasts a more powerful controller capable of rich capabilities like compression, replication, tiering, thin provisioning, and more. Check out the details here.

Also at Edge2014 there was considerable talk about Elastic Storage. This is the storage you have always imagined. You can manage mixed storage pools of any device. Integrate with any OS. Write policies to it. It seems infinitely scalable. Acts as a universal cloud gateway. And even works with tape.

Sounds magical doesn’t it?  According to IBM, Elastic Storage provides automated tiering to move data from different storage media types. Infrequently accessed files can be migrated to tape and automatically recalled back to disk when required—sounds like EasyTier built in. Unlike traditional storage, it allows you to smoothly grow or shrink your storage infrastructure without application disruption or outages. And it can run on a cluster of x86 and POWER-based servers and can be used with internal disk, commodity storage, or advanced storage systems from IBM or other vendors. Half the speakers at the conference glowed about Elastic Storage.  Obviously it exists, but it is not an actually named product yet. Watch for it, but it is going to have a different name when finally released, probably later this year. No hint at what that name will be.

IBM, at the conference, identified the enhanced XIV as the ideal cloud infrastructure. XIV eliminates complexity. It enables high levels of resiliency and ensures service levels. As one speaker said: “It populates LUNs and spreads the workload evenly. You don’t even have to load balance it.” Basically, it is grid storage that is ideal for the cloud.

LTFS (Linear Tape File System) was another storage technology that came up surprisingly frequently. Don’t assume that that tape has no future, not judging from IBM Edge2014. LTFS provides a GUI that enables you to automatically move infrequently accessed data from disk to tape without the need for proprietary tape applications. Implementing LTFS Enterprise Edition allows you to replace disk with tape for tiered storage and lower your storage TCO by over 50%. Jon Toigo, a leading storage analyst, has some good numbers on tape economics that may surprise you.

Another sometimes overlooked technology is EasyTier, IBM’s storage tiering tool.  EasyTier has evolved into a main way for IBM storage users to capitalize on the benefits of Flash. EasyTier already has emerged as an effective tool for both the DS8000 and the Storwize V7000.  With EasyTier small amounts of Flash can deliver big performance improvements.

In the coming weeks DancingDinosaur will look at other IBM Edge 2014 topics.  It also is time to start thinking about IBM Enterprise 2014, which combines the System z and Power platforms. It will be at the Venetian in Las Vegas, Oct 6-10. IBM Enterprise 2014 is being billed as the premier enterprise infrastructure event.

BTW, we never effectively solved the challenge of distributing desktop programs until the industry came out with 5.5” floppy disks. Years later my children used the unsold floppies as little Frisbees.

Follow Alan Radding and DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog

The zEnterprise as a Hybrid Data Center

November 21, 2013

There is no doubt that the zEnterprise enables hybrid computing. Just attach a zBX to it and start plugging in Linux and x86 blades; presto, you’ve got hybrid computing.  You can manage this entire hybrid infrastructure via the Unified Resource Manager.

The zEnterprise also has a sister hybrid computing platform, IBM PureSystems. Here, too, you can add in System x and Linux or even Power and System i and do hybrid computing. You can also manage the hybrid environment through a single console, albeit a different console—the Flex System Manager—and manage this second IBM hybrid platform as a unified environment.  DancingDinosaur has noted the irony of IBM having two different, incompatible hybrid systems; IBM has reassured this blogger several times that it is trying to converge the two. Whenever it happens DancingDinosaur will be the first to report it.

The zEnterprise or even PureSystems as a hybrid computing platform, however, is not the same as a hybrid data center.  Apparently there is no definition of a hybrid data center despite all the talk about hybrid computing, hybrid clouds, and hybrid systems.  As best DancingDinosaur can piece it together, the hybrid data center is multiplatform like the zEnterprise, but it also is multi-location, often using co-location facilities or factory-built containerized data centers (IBM calls them Portable Modular Data Centers, PMDC). More often, however, hybrid data centers are associated with cloud computing as the third of the three flavors of cloud (private, public, hybrid).

Gartner recently described some architecture options for a hybrid data center. In one case you could have a zEnterprise acting as, say, a private cloud using a co-location facility as a DMZ between the private cloud and a public cloud like Amazon. Not sure, however, you would need the DMZ if your private cloud was running on the highly secure zEnterprise but Gartner included it. Go figure.

Hybrid showed up in numerous Enterprise 2013 sessions this past October. You can catch some video highlights from it here. The conference made frequent mention of hybrid in numerous sessions, some noted in previous DancingDinosaur posts, such as Exploring the World of zEnterprise Hybrid: How Does It Work and What’s the Point? The session introduced the Unified Resource Manager and described how it would allow an IT shop to manage a collection of one or more zEnterprise nodes including any optionally attached zBX cabinets as a single logical virtualized system through a Hardware Management Console (HMC). In short, it was about providing a single point of control through which data center personnel can deploy, configure, monitor, manage and maintain the integrated System z and zBX blades based on heterogeneous architectures in a unified manner. But it wasn’t talking about the hybrid enterprise data center described in the previous paragraph.

Similarly, Application Performance Management and Capacity Planning for the IBM zEnterprise Hybrid Workload focused on extending the Unified Resource Manager to goal-oriented performance management for both traditional System z and BladeCenter applications. It was about applying WLM, RMF, and Platform Performance Management to cross-platform hybrid applications. Again, this really wasn’t about the hybrid data center described above.

BTW, plans apparently already are underway for Enterprise 2014. Looks like it will be Oct. 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. It should be quite an event given that IBM will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mainframe in 2014.

And there is much more on z hybrid computing and hybrid clouds. The zEnterprise has its own page on cloud computing here, and last month the zEnterprise zBC12 won CRN Tech Innovator Award for the most Innovative cloud solution.  You can also click here to see how a dozen IBM customers used various IBM platforms to build hybrid clouds.

IBM has already used the zEnterprise to consolidate over 30,000 servers around the world for an 84% improvement in data center efficiency and a 50% reduction in power and cooling. This effectively freed $1 billion to spend on innovative new projects that drive business growth across the company. And IBM is about as hybrid a data center as you can find.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog


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