Posts Tagged ‘Enterprise’

Enterprise 2013—System z Storage, Hybrid Computing, Social and More

October 10, 2013

The abstract for the Enterprise 2013 System z program runs 43 pages. Haven’t tallied the number of sessions offered but there certainly are enough to keep you busy for the entire conference (Oct. 20-25, in Orlando, register now) and longer.

Just the storage-related sessions are wide ranging, from  DFSM, which DancingDinosaur covered a few weeks back following the SHARE Boston event here, to the IBM Flash portfolio, System z Flash Express, dynamically provisioning Linux on z storage, capacity management, and more. For storage newcomers, there even is a two-part session on System z Storage Basics.

A storage session titled the Evolution of Space Management looks interesting.  After the advent of System Managed Storage (SMS), the mainframe went decades without much change in the landscape of space management processing. Space management consisted of the standard three-tier hierarchy of Primary Level 0 and the two Migration tiers, Migration Level 1 (disk) and Migration Level 2 (tape).This session examines recent advances in both tape and disk technologies that have dramatically changed that landscape and provided new opportunities for managing data on the z. Maybe they will add a level above primary called flash next year. This session will cover how the advances are evolving the space management hierarchy and what to consider when determining which solutions are best for your environment.

IBM has been going hog-wild with flash, the TMS acquisition playing no small part no doubt. Any number of sessions deal with flash storage. This one, IBM’s Flash Portfolio and Futures, seems particularly appealing. It takes a look at how IBM has acquired and improved upon flash technology over what amounts to eight generations technology refinements.  The session will look at how flash will play a major role across not only IBM’s storage products but IBM’s overall solution portfolio. Flash technology is changing the way companies are managing their data today and it is changing the way they understand and manage the economics of technology. This session also will cover how IBM plans to leverage flash in its roadmap moving forward.

Hybrid computing is another phenomenon that has swept over the z in recent years. For that reason this session looks especially interesting, Exploring the World of zEnterprise Hybrid: How Does It Work and What’s the Point? The IBM zEnterprise hybrid system introduces the Unified Resource Manager, allowing an IT shop to manage a collection of one or more zEnterprise nodes, including an optionally attached zBX loaded with blades for different platforms, as a single logical virtualized system through a single mainframe console. The mainframe can now act as the primary point of control through which data center personnel can deploy, configure, monitor, manage, and maintain the integrated System z and zBX blades based on heterogeneous architectures but in a unified manner. It amounts to a new world of blades and virtual servers with the z at the center of it.

Maybe one of the hardest things for traditional z data center managers to get their heads around is social business on the mainframe. But here it is: IBM DevOps Solution: Accelerating the Delivery of Multiplatform Applications looks at social business and mobile along with big data, and cloud technologies as driving the demand for faster approaches to software delivery across all platforms, middleware, and devices. The ultimate goal is to push out more features in each release and get more releases out the door with confidence, while maintaining compliance and quality. To succeed, some cultural, process, and technology gaps must be addressed through tools from Rational.

IBM has even set itself up as a poster child for social business in another session, Social Business and Collaboration at IBM, which features the current deployment within IBM of its social business and collaboration environments. Major core components are currently deployed on System z. The session will look at what IBM is doing and how they do it and the advantages and benefits it experiences.

Next week, the last DancingDinosaur posting before Enterprise 2013 begins will look at some other sessions, including software defined everything and Linux on z.

When DancingDinosaur first started writing about the mainframe over 20 years ago it was a big, powerful (for the time), solid performer that handled a few core tasks, did them remarkably well, and still does so today. At that time even the mainframe’s most ardent supporters didn’t imagine the wide variety of things it does now as can be found at Enterprise 2013.

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Enterprise 2013 Offers a Packed Program of System z, zEnterprise, Linux on z Sessions

October 3, 2013

IBM’s Enterprise 2013 conference in Orlando is coming up soon, starting Oct. 21. It will combine the System z and the Power Systems technical universities with an Executive Summit. DancingDinosaur will be there and just had a chance to look over the System z session catalog, all 43 pages packed with interesting System z programs. Here are few that should be of particular interest.

BYOD –The Return of Terminals. DancingDinosaur touched on this just a couple of weeks ago here. The session will delve into what it sees as an IT revolution, where mobile devices start replacing PCs the way PCs replaced terminals. So why is this good news for the mainframe data center? Because it brings control of end user computing back to the mainframe data center.  Other mobile System z sessions look at ways to connect mobile apps to the z, the use of Worklight with the z, and the basics of enterprise mobile computing

z/OS Applications –Adapting at the Speed of Business.  The session looks at how to respond to business people hammering on your door to make changes to production applications immediately. Typically these changes are small, more about changing the business behavior of the application than any real structural change, or maybe they are timed to your business cycle.  In any case, the session examines ways to handle those changes with shorter turnaround while also establishing a common terminology between you and the business analysts.  IBM has decision management technology that can tightly integrate with your existing COBOL and PL/I applications to handle those changes. A sort of IBM’s version of DevOps for the z although it also has DevOps solutions. Anyway, the result can be more stable applications performing as well or better than they do now, while delivering the behavior the business wants. Specifically, the session will show how to use the IBM Operational Decision Manager to make your z/OS applications more responsive to the ever-changing demands of the business teams.

Moving from a Legacy Mainframe System to a Modern Environment—a case study. Actually Enterprise 2013 appears to be packed with case studies. Here Fidelity Investments will discuss how it moved from a legacy z system to a modernized agile z-based environment that supports the requirements of their customers. The session will focus on how Fidelity used Rational tools on z to build out and deploy the new environment.

IBM DevOps Solution: Collaborative Development to Spark Innovation and Integration among Teams—as it turns out, Enterprise 2013 features a number of sessions focused on DevOps, which combines app dev with an agile deployment approach. The basic idea is that application development cannot be sustained in disjointed silos. New mobile, social, big data and analytics projects demand the development process to be fast, integrated, creative, and affordable. Furthermore, business needs change quickly, making it necessary to re-prioritize work and shift resources to different projects efficiently. With advanced, productive and unified development environments from Rational and middleware from CICS, this session will show you how you can apply talent across boundaries and keep the focus on innovation and high quality code development and test.

A related session is IBM DevOps Solution: Accelerating the Delivery of Multiplatform Applications. Here mobile, social, big data, and cloud technologies are driving the demand for faster and more recurrent approaches to software delivery across all platforms, middleware, and devices. The ultimate goal is to push out significantly more features in each release and get more releases out the door with confidence, while maintaining compliance and quality. DevOps is hot; if your shop hasn’t tuned into DevOps yet, Enterprise 2013 will be a good place to get up to speed.

Moving CICS Applications into the Cloud—the cloud is going to be increasingly central in almost all you do going forward and CICS has to be there. This session introduces CICS TS 5.1 as new infrastructure to increase your service agility and move towards a service delivery platform for cloud computing. For agile service delivery, CICS resources are packaged together, hosted as applications on a platform, and managed dynamically with policies. The latest release of CICS IA (Interdependency Analyzer) allows you to gain far greater insight into your applications and their dependencies while fine-tuning application performance and identifying bottlenecks. And then there is the CICS concept of a platform. Platforms provide services and resources so that applications can be rapidly deployed based on their requirements, combined with policies that enable the behavior of applications and platforms to be managed by determining whether tasks running as part of a platform, as an application, or as types of operations within an application. Expect many CICS sessions on every topic imaginable as CICS emerges as one of the central components of IBM’s expanded idea of the mainframe.

The Enterprise 2013 program is rich with System z material. DancingDinosaur will take up more of it next week. In the meantime, please register for the conference and feel welcome to introduce yourself to me at the event. You’ll find me wherever analysts, bloggers, and journalists hang out. Also, feel welcome to follow me on Twitter, @mainframeblog.


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