Posts Tagged ‘HP-UX’

New Syncsort Tools Boost IBMi

July 25, 2018

Earlier this week Syncsort announced new additions to its family of products that can be used to help address top-of-mind compliance challenges faced by IT leaders, especially IBMi shops. Specifically, Syncsort’s IBMi security products can help IBMi shops comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and strengthen security with multi-factor authentication.

The new innovations in the Syncsort Assure products follow the recent acquisition of IBMi data privacy products from Townsend Security. The Alliance Encryption and Security Suite can be used to address protection of sensitive information and compliance with multi-factor authentication, encryption, tokenization, secure file transfer, and system log collection.

Syncsort’s Cilasoft Compliance and Security Suite for IBMi and Syncsort’s Enforcive Enterprise Security Suite provide unique tools that can help organizations comply with regulatory requirements and address security auditing and control policies. New releases of both security suites deliver technology that can be used to help accelerate and maintain compliance with GDPR.

As the bad guys get more effective, multi-factor authentication is required in many compliance regulations; such as PCI-DSS 3.2, NYDFS Cybersecurity Regulation, Swift Alliance Access, and HIPAA. Multi-factor authentication strengthens login security by requiring something more than a password or passphrase; only granting access after two or more authentication factors have been verified.

To help organizations fulfill regulatory requirements and improve the security of their IBMi systems and applications, Syncsort has delivered the new, RSA-certified Cilasoft Reinforced Authentication Manager for IBMi (RAMi). RAMi’s rules engine facilitates the set-up of multi-factor authentication screens for users or situations that require it, based on specific criteria. RAMi’s authentication features also enable self-service user profile re-enablement and password changes and support of the four eyes principle of supervised changes to sensitive data. Four eyes principle requires that any requested action must be approved by at least two people.

Syncsort expects 30% of its revenue to come from IBMi products. It also plans to integrate its Assure products with Ironstream to offer capacity management for IBMi.

In one sense, Syncsort is joining a handful of vendors, led by IBM, who continue to expand and enhance IBMi. DancingDinosaur has been writing about the IBMi even before it became the AS400, which recently celebrated its 30th birthday this week, writes Timothy Prickett Morgan, a leading analyst at the Next Platform. The predecessors to the AS/400 that your blogger wrote about back then were the System 36 and System 38, but they didn’t survive.  In those 30+ years, however, the IBMi platform has continued to evolve to meet customer needs, most recently by running on Power Systems, where it still remains a viable business, Morgan noted.

The many rivals of the OS/400 platform and its follow-ons since that initial launch of the AS/400 are now gone. You may recall a few of them: DEC’s VMS for the VAX and Alpha systems, Hewlett Packard’s MPE for the HP 3000, HP-UX for the HP 9000s, and Sun Microsystems’ Solaris for the Sparc systems.  DancingDinosaur once tried to cheerlead an effort to port Solaris/Sparc to the mainframe but IBM didn’t buy into that.

Among all of these and other platforms, IBMi is still out there, with probably around 125,000 unique customers and maybe between 250,000 and 300,000 systems. Morgan estimates.

He adds: As much as computing and automation has exploded on the scene since the first AS/400 arrived, one thing continues: Good old fashioned online transaction processing is something that every business still has to do, and even the biggest hyperscalers use traditional applications to keep the books and run the payroll.

The IBMi platform operates as more than an OLTP machine, evolving within the constantly changing environment of modern datacenters. This is a testament, Morgan believes, to the ingenuity and continuing investment by IBM in its Power chips, Power Systems servers, and the IBMi and AIX operating systems. Yes, Linux came along two decades ago and has bolstered the Power platforms, but not to the same extent that Linux bolstered the mainframe. The mainframe had much higher costs and lower priced Linux engines on mainframes exhibited a kind of elasticity of demand that IBM wishes it could get for IBMi and z/OS. Morgan is right about a lot but DancingDinosaur still wishes IBM had backed Solaris/Sparc on the z alongside Linux. Oh well.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.


%d bloggers like this: