Posts Tagged ‘hybrid cloud’

IBM Suggests Astounding Productivity with Cloud Pak for Automation

November 25, 2019

DancingDinosaur thought IBM would not introduce another Cloud Pak until after the holidays, but I was wrong. Last week IBM launched Cloud Pak for security. According to IBM it helps an organization uncover threats, make more informed risk-based decisions, and prioritize your team’s time. 

More specifically, it connects the organization’s existing data sources to generate deeper insights. In the process you can access IBM and third-party tools to search for threats across any cloud or on-premises location. Quickly orchestrate actions and responses to those threats  while leaving your data where it is.

DancingDinosaur’s only disappointment in the IBM’s new security cloud pak as with other IBM Cloud Paks is that it runs only on Linux. That means it doesn’t run RACF, the legendary IBM access control tool for zOS. IBM’s Cloud Paks reportedly run on z Systems, but only those running Linux. Not sure how IBM can finesse this particular issue. 

Of the 5 original IBM Cloud Paks (application, data, integration, multicloud mgt, and automation) only one offers the kind of payback that will wow top c-level execs; automation.  Find Cloud Park for Automation here.

To date, IBM reports  over 5000 customers have used IBM Digital Business Automation to run their digital business. At the same time, IBM claims successful digitization has increased organizational scale and fueled growth of knowledge work.

McKinsey & Company notes that such workers spend up to 28 hours each week on low value work. IBM’s goal with digital business automation is to bring digital scale to knowledge work and free these workers to work on high value tasks.

Such tasks include collaborating and using creativity to come up with new ideas or meeting and building relationships with clients or resolving issues and exceptions. By automating these tasks the payoff, says IBM, can be staggering simply  by applying intelligent automation.

“We can reclaim 120 billion hours a year  spent by knowledge workers on low value work by using intelligent automation,” declares IBM.  So what value can you reclaim over the course of the year for your operation with, say, 100 knowledge workers, earning, maybe, $22 per hour, or maybe 1000 workers earning $35/hr. You can do the math. 

As you would expect,  automation is the critical component of this particular Cloud Pak. The main targets for enhancement or assistance among the rather broad category of knowledge workers are administrative/departmental work and expert work, which includes cross enterprise work.  IBM offers vendor management as one example.

The goal is to digitize core services by automating at scale and building low code/no code apps for your knowledge workers. For what IBM refers to as digital workers, who are key to this plan, the company wants to free them for higher value work. IBM’s example of such an expert worker would be a loan officer. 

Central to IBM’s Cloud Pak for Automation is what IBM calls its Intelligent Automation Platform. Some of this is here now, according to the company, with more coming in the future. Here now is the ability to create apps using low code tooling, reuse assets from business automation workflow, and create new UI assets.

Coming up in some unspecified timeframe is the ability to enable  digital workers to automate job roles, define and create content services to enable intelligent capture and extraction, and finally to envision and create decision services to offload and automate routine decisions.

Are your current and would-be knowledge workers ready to contribute or participate in this scheme? Maybe for some. it depends for others. To capture those billions of hours of increased productivity, however, they will have to step up to it. But you can be pretty sure IBM will do it for you if you ask.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at http://technologywriter.com/ 

 

IBM Cloud Pak Rollouts Continue

November 14, 2019

IBM Cloud Paks have emerged as a key strategy by the company to grow not just its cloud, but more importantly, its hybrid cloud business. For the past year or so, IBM shifted its emphasis from clouds to hybrid clouds. No doubt this is driven by its realization that its enterprise clients are adopting multiple clouds, necessitating the hybrid cloud.

The company is counting on success in hybrid clouds.  For years IBM has scrambled to claw a place for itself among the top cloud players but from the time DancingDinosaur has tracked IBM’s cloud presence it has never risen higher than third. In 2019, the top cloud providers are AWS, Microsoft, Google, IBM, Oracle, Alibaba, with IBM slipping to fourth in one analyst’s ranking.

Hybrid clouds, over time, can change the dynamics of the market. It has not, however, changed things much according to a ranking from Datamation. “There are too many variables to strictly rank hybrid cloud providers,” notes Datamation. With that said, Datamation still ranked them starting with  Amazon’s Amazon Web Services (AWS), which remains the unquestioned leader of the business with twice the market share as its next leading competitor, Microsoft/Azure, and followed by IBM. The company is counting on its Red Hat acquisition, which includes OpenShift along with Enterprise Linux, to alter its market standing.. 

The hybrid cloud segment certainly encompasses a wider range of customer needs, so there are ways IBM can work Red Hat to give it some advantages in pricing and packaging, which it has already signaled it can and will do, starting with OpenShift. DancingDinosaur doubts it will overtake AWS outright, but as noted above, hybrid clouds are a different beast. So don’t rule out IBM in the hybrid cloud market.

Another thing that may give IBM an edge in hybrid clouds among its enterprise customers are its Cloud Paks.  As IBM describes them Cloud Paks are enterprise-ready, containerized software that give organizations an open, faster and more secure way to move core business applications to any cloud. Each IBM Cloud Pak runs on Red Hat OpenShift, IBM Cloud, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. 

Each pak includes containerized IBM middleware and common software services for development and management. Also included is a common integration layer designed to reduce development time by up to 84 percent and operational expenses by up to 75 percent, according to IBM.

Cloud Paks, IBM continues,, enable you to easily deploy modern enterprise software either on-premises, in the cloud, or with pre-integrated systems and quickly bring workloads to production by seamlessly leveraging Kubernetes as the container management framework supporting production-level qualities of service and end-to-end lifecycle management. This gives organizations an open, faster, more secure way to move core business applications to any cloud.

When IBM introduced Cloud Paks a few weeks ago they planned a suite of five Cloud Paks:  

  • Application
  • Data
  • Integration
  • Automation
  • Multi Cloud mgt

Don’t be surprised as hybrid cloud usage evolves if even more Cloud Paks eventually appear. It becomes an opportunity for IBM to bundle together more of its existing tools and products and send them to the cloud too.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at http://technologywriter.com/ 

October 8, 2019

z15 LinuxONE III for Hybrid Cloud

 

It didn’t take long following the introduction of the z15 for a LinuxONE to arrive. Meet the LinuxONE III, a z15 machine with dedicated built-in Linux. And it comes with the primary goodies that the z15 offers: automatic pervasive compression of everything along with a closely related privacy capability, Data Passport.

3-frame LinuxONE III

Z-quality security, privacy, and availability, it turns out, has become central to the mission of the LinuxONE III.The reason is simple: Cloud. According to IBM, only 20% of workloads have been moved to cloud. Why? Companies need assurance that their data privacy and security will not be breached. To many IT pros and business executives, the cloud remains the wild, wild west where bad guys roam looking to steal whatever they can.

IBM is touting the LinuxONE III, which is built on its newly introduced z15, for hybrid clouds. The company has been preaching the gospel of clouds and, particularly, hybrid clouds for several years, which was its primary reason for acquiring Red Hat. Red Hat Linux is built into the LinuxONE III, probably its first formal appearance since IBM closed its acquisition of Red Hat this spring. 

With Red Hat and z15 IBM is aiming to cash in on what it sees as a big opportunity in hybrid clouds. While the Cloud brings the promise of flexibility, agility and openness, only 20% of workloads have been moved to cloud, notes IBM. Why? Companies need assurance that their data privacy and security will not be breached. LinuxONE III also promises cloud native development.

By integrating the new IBM LinuxONE III as a key element in an organization’s hybrid cloud strategy, it adds another level of security and stability and availability to its cloud infrastructure. It gives the organization both agile deployment and unbeatable levels of uptime, reliability, and security. While the cloud already offers appealing flexibility and costs, the last three capabilities–uptime, reliability, security–are not usually associated with cloud computing. By security, IBM means 100% data encryption automatically, from the moment the data arrives or is created. And it remains encrypted for the rest of its life, at rest or in transit.

Are those capabilities important? You bet. A Harris study commissioned by IBM found that 64 percent of all consumers have opted not to work with a business out of concerns over whether that business could keep their data secure. However, that same study found 76 percent of respondents would be more willing to share personal information if there was a way to fully take back and retrieve that data at any time. Thus the importance of the z15’s pervasive encryption and the new data passports.

IBM has previously brought out its latest z running dedicated Linux. Initially it was a way to expand the z market through a reduced cost z.  DancingDinosaur doesn’t know the cost of the LinuxONE III. In the past they have been discounted but given the $34 billion IBM spent to acquire Red Hat the new machines might not be such a bargain this time.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at http://technologywriter.com/ 

IBM teams with Cloudera and Hortonworks 

July 11, 2019

Dancing Dinosaur has a friend on the West coast who finally left IBM after years of complaining, swearing never to return, and has been happily working at Cloudera ever since. IBM and Cloudera this week announced a strategic partnership to develop joint go-to-market programs designed to bring advanced data and AI solutions to more organizations across the expansive Apache Hadoop ecosystem.

Graphic representing a single solution for big data analytics

Deploy a single solution for big data

The agreement builds on the long-standing relationship between IBM and Hortonworks, which merged with Cloudera this past January to create integrated solutions for data science and data management. The new agreement builds on the integrated solutions and extends them to include the Cloudera platform. “This should stop the big-data-is-dead thinking that has been cropping up,” he says, putting his best positive spin on the situation.

Unfortunately, my West coast buddy may be back at IBM sooner than he thinks. With IBM finalizing its $34 billion Red Hat acquisition yesterday, it is small additional money to just buy Horton and Cloudera and own them all as a solid big data-cloud capabilities block IBM owns.  

As IBM sees it, the companies have partnered to offer an industry-leading, enterprise-grade Hadoop distribution plus an ecosystem of integrated products and services – all designed to help organizations achieve faster analytic results at scale. As a part of this partnership, IBM promises to:

  • Resell and support of Cloudera products
  • Sell and support of Hortonworks products under a multi-year contract
  • Provide migration assistance to future Cloudera/Hortonworks unity products
  • Deliver the benefits of the combined IBM and Cloudera collaboration and investment in the open source community, along with commitment to better support analytics initiatives from the edge to AI.

IBM also will resell the Cloudera Enterprise Data Hub, Cloudera DataFlow, and Cloudera Data Science Workbench. In response, Cloudera will begin to resell IBM’s Watson Studio and BigSQL.

“By teaming more strategically with IBM we can accelerate data-driven decision making for our joint enterprise customers who want a hybrid and multi-cloud data management solution with common security and governance,” said Scott Andress, Cloudera’s Vice President of Global Channels and Alliances in the announcement. 

Cloudera enables organizations to transform complex data into clear and actionable insights. It delivers an enterprise data cloud for any data, anywhere, from the edge to AI. One obvious question: how long until IBM wants to include Cloudera as part of its own hybrid cloud? 

But IBM isn’t stopping here. It also just announced new storage solutions across AI and big data, modern data protection, hybrid multicloud, and more. These innovations will allow organizations to leverage more heterogeneous data sources and data types for deeper insights from AI and analytics, expand their ability to consolidate rapidly expanding data on IBM’s object storage, and extend modern data protection to support more workloads in hybrid cloud environments.

The key is IBM Spectrum Discover, metadata management software that provides data insight for petabyte-scale unstructured storage. The software connects to IBM Cloud Object Storage and IBM Spectrum Scale, enabling it to rapidly ingest, consolidate, and index metadata for billions of files and objects. It provides a rich metadata layer that enables storage administrators, data stewards, and data scientists to efficiently manage, classify, and gain insights from massive amounts of unstructured data. Combining that with Cloudera and Horton on the IBM’s hybrid cloud should give you a powerful data analytics solution. 

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com. 

 

12 Ingredients for App Modernization

January 8, 2019

It is no surprise that IBM has become so enamored with the hybrid cloud. The worldwide public cloud services market is projected to grow 21.4 percent in 2018 to total $186.4 billion, up from $153.5 billion in 2017, according to Gartner.

The fastest-growing segment of the market is cloud system infrastructure services (IaaS), which is forecast to grow 35.9 percent in 2018 to reach $40.8 billion. Gartner expects the top 10 providers, often referred to as hyperscalers, to account for nearly 70 percent of the IaaS market by 2021, up from 50 percent in 2016.

Cloud computing is poised to become a “turbocharged engine powering digital transformation around the world,” states a recent Forrester report, Predictions 2019: Cloud Computing. Overall, the global cloud computing market, including cloud platforms, business services, and SaaS, will exceed $200 billion this year, expanding at more than 20%, the research firm predicts

Venkats’ recipe for app modernization; courtesy of IBM

Hybrid clouds, which include two or more cloud providers or platforms, are emerging as the preferred approach for enterprises.  Notes IBM: The digital economy is forcing organizations to a multi-cloud environment. Three of every four enterprises have already implemented more than one cloud. The growth of cloud portfolios in enterprises demands an agnostic cloud management platform — one that not only provides automation, provisioning and orchestration, but also monitors trends and usage to prevent outages. No surprise here; IBM just happens to offer hybrid cloud management.

By the start of 2019, the top seven cloud providers are AWS, Azure, Google Cloud, IBM Cloud, VMWare Cloud on AWS, Oracle Cloud, and Alibaba Cloud. These top players have been shifting positions around in 2018 and expect more shifting to continue this year and probably for years to come.

Clients, notes Venkat, are discovering that the real value of Cloud comes in a hybrid, multi-cloud world. In this model, legacy applications are modernized with a real microservices architecture and with AI embedded in the application. He does not fully explain where the AI comes from and how it is embedded. Maybe I missed something.

Driving this interest for the next couple of years, at least, is interest in application modernization. Companies are discovering that the real value comes through a hybrid multicloud. Here legacy applications are modernized through a real microservices architecture enhanced with AI embedded in the application, says Meenagi Venkat, Vice President of Technical Sales & Solutioning, at IBM Cloud. Venkat wrote what he calls a 12-ingredient recipe for application modernization here. Dancing Dinosaur will highlight a couple of the ingredients below. Click the proceeding link to see them all.

To begin, when you modernize a large portfolio of several thousand applications in a large enterprise, you need some common approaches. At the same time, the effort must allow teams to evolve to a microservices-based organization where each microservice is designed and delivered with great independence.

Start by fostering a startup culture. Fostering a startup culture that allows for fast failure is one of the most critical ingredients when approaching a large modernization program. The modernization will involve sunsetting some applications, breaking some down, and using partner services in others. A startup culture based on methods such as IBM Garage Method and Design Thinking will help bring the how-to of the culture shift.

Then, innovate via product design Venkat continues. A team heavy with developers and no product folks is likely to focus on the technical coolness rather than product innovation. Hence, these teams should be led by the product specialists who deliver the business case for new services or client experience

And don’t neglect security. Secure DevOps will require embedding security skills in the scrum teams with a product owner leading the team. The focus on the product and on designing security (and compliance) to various regimes at the start will allow the scaling of microservices and engender trust in the data and AI layers. Venkat put this after design and the startup culture. In truth, this should be a key part of the startup culture.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

IBM Pushes Hybrid Cloud

December 14, 2018

Between quantum computing, blockchain, and hybrid cloud IBM is pursuing a pretty ambitious agenda. Of the three, hybrid promises the most immediate payback. Cloud computing is poised to become a “turbocharged engine powering digital transformation around the world,” states a new Forrester report, Predictions 2019: Cloud Computing

Of course, IBM didn’t wait until 2019. It purchased Red Hat Linux at the end of Oct. 2018. DancingDinosaur covered it here a few days later. At that time IBM Chairman Ginni Rometty called the acquisition of Red Hat a game-changer. “It changes everything about the cloud market,” she noted. At a cost of $34 billion, 10x Red Hat’s gross revenue, it had better be a game changer.

Forrester continues, predicting that in 2019 the cloud will reach its more interesting young adult years, bringing innovative development services to enterprise apps rather than just serving up cheaper, temporary servers and storage, which is how it has primarily grown over the past decade. Who hasn’t turned to one or another cloud provider to augment its IT resources as needed, whether backup or server capacity, and network?

As Forrester puts it: The six largest hyperscale cloud leaders — Alibaba, Amazon Web Services [AWS], Google, IBM, Microsoft Azure, and Oracle — will all grow larger in 2019, as service catalogs and global regions expand. Meanwhile, the global cloud computing market, including cloud platforms, business services, and SaaS, will exceed $200 billion in 2019, expanding at more than 20%, the research firm predicts.

Hybrid clouds, which provide two or more cloud providers or platforms, are emerging as the preferred way for enterprises to go.  Notes IBM: The digital economy is forcing organizations to a multi-cloud environment. Three of every four enterprises have already implemented more than one cloud. The growth of cloud portfolios in enterprises demands an agnostic cloud management platform — one that not only provides automation, provisioning and orchestration, but that also monitors trends and usage to prevent outages.

Of course, IBM also offers a solution for this; the company’s Multicloud Manager runs on its IBM Cloud Private platform, which is based on Kubernetes container orchestration technology, described as an open-source approach for ‘wrapping’ apps in containers, and thereby making them easier and cheaper to manage across different cloud environments – from on-premises systems to the public cloud.

Along with hybrid clouds containers are huge in Forrester’s view. Powered by cloud-native open source components and tools, companies will start rolling out their own digital application platforms that will span clouds, include serverless and event-driven services, and form the foundation for modernizing core business apps for the next decade, the researchers observed. Next year’s hottest trend, according to Forrester, will be making containers easier to deploy, secure, monitor, scale, and upgrade. “Enterprise-ready container platforms from Docker, IBM, Mesosphere, Pivotal, Rancher, Red Hat, VMware, and others are poised to grow rapidly,” the researchers noted.

This may not be as straightforward as the researchers imply. Each organization must select for itself which private cloud strategy is most appropriate, they note. They anticipate greater private cloud structure emerging in 2019. It noted that organizations face three basic private cloud paths: building internally, using vSphere sprinkled with developer-focused tools and software-defined infrastructure; and having its cloud environment custom-built with converged or hyperconverged software stacks to minimize the tech burden. Or lastly, building its cloud infrastructure internally with OpenStack, relying on the hard work of its own tech-savvy team. Am sure there are any number of consultants, contractors, and vendors eager to step in and do this for you.

If you aren’t sure, IBM is offering a number of free trials that you can play with.

As Forrester puts it: Buckle up; for 2019 expect the cloud ride to accelerate.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

Arcati 2017 Mainframe Survey—Cognitive a No-Show

February 2, 2017

DancingDinosaur checks into Arcati’s annual mainframe survey every few years. You can access a copy of the 2017 report here.  Some of the data doesn’t change much, a few percentage points here or there. For example, 75% of the respondents consider the mainframe too expensive. OK, people have been saying that for years.

On the other hand, 65% of the respondents’ mainframes are involved with web services. Half also run Java-based mainframe apps, up from 30% last year, while 17% more are planning to run Java with their mainframe this year. Similarly, 35% of respondents report running Linux on the mainframe, up from 22% last year. Again, 13% of the respondents expect to add Linux this year.  Driving this is the advantageous cost and management benefits that result from consolidating distributed Linux workloads on the z. Yes, things are changing.

linuxone-5558_d_ibm_linuxone_social_tile_990_550_4_081515

The biggest surprise for DancingDinosaur, however, revolved around IBM’s latest strategic initiatives, especially cognitive computing and blockchain.  Other strategic initiatives may include, depending on who is briefing you at the moment—security, data analytics, cloud, hybrid cloud, and mobile. These strategic imperatives, especially cognitive computing, are expected to drive IBM’s revenue. In the latest statement, reported last week in DancingDinosaur, strategic imperatives amounted to 41% of revenue.  Cloud revenue and Cloud-as-a-service also rose considerably, 35% and 61% respectively.

When DancingDinosaur searched the accompanying Arcati vendor report (over 120 vendors with brief descriptions) for cognitive only GT Software came up. IBM didn’t even mention cognitive in its vendor listing, which admittedly was skimpy. The case was the same with Blockchain; only one vendor, Atos, mentioned it and nothing about blockchain in the IBM listing. More vendors, however, noted supporting one or some of the other supposed strategic initiatives.

Overall, the Arcati survey is quite positive about the mainframe. The survey found that 50 percent of sites viewed their mainframe as a legacy system (down from last year’s 62 percent). However, 22 percent (up from 16 percent last year) viewed mainframe as strategic, with 28 percent (up from 22 percent) viewing mainframes as both strategic and legacy.

Reinforcing the value of the mainframe, the survey found 78 percent of sites experienced some kind of increase in capacity. With increased demand for mainframe resources (data and processing), it should not be surprising that respondents report an 81 percent an increase in technology costs. Yet, 38 percent of sites report their people costs have decreased or stayed the same.

Unfortunately, the survey also found that 70 percent of respondents thought there were a cultural barrier between mainframe and other IT professionals. That did not discourage respondents from pointing out the mainframe advantages: 100 percent highlighted the benefit of the mainframe’s availability, 83 percent highlighted security, 75 percent identified scalability, and 71 percent picked manageability as a mainframe benefit.

Also, social media runs on the mainframe. Respondents found social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) useful for their work on the mainframe. Twenty-seven percent report using social (up slightly from 25 percent last year) with the rest not using it at all despite IBM offering Facebook pages dedicated to IMS, CICS, and DB2. DancingDinosaur, only an occasional FB visitor, will check it out and report.

In terms of how mainframes are being used, the Arcati survey found that 25 percent of sites are planning to use Big Data; five percent of sites have adopted it for DevOps while 48 percent are planning to use mainframe DevOps going forward. Similarly, 14 percent of respondents already are reusing APIs while another 41 percent are planning to.

Arcati points out another interesting thought: The survey showed a 55:45 percent split in favor of distributed systems. So, you might expect the spend on the two types of platform to be similar. Yet, the survey found that 87 percent of an organization’s IT spend was going to distributed systems! Apparently mainframes aren’t as expensive as people think. Or put it another way, the cost of owning and operating distributed systems with mainframe-caliber QoS amounts to a lot more than people are admitting.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

BMC Mainframe Survey Confirms z System Is Here to Stay

November 11, 2016

No surprise there. BMC’s 11th annual mainframe survey covering 1,200 mainframe executives and tech professionals found 58% of respondents reported usage of the mainframe is increasing as they look to capitalize on every infrastructure advantage it provides and add more workloads. Another 23% consider the mainframe as the best option to run critical work.

ibm_system_z10

IBM z10

Driving the continuing interest in the mainframe are the new demands for data handling, scalable processing, analytics, and more. According to the BMC survey nearly 60% of companies are seeing increased data and transaction volumes. They opt to stay with the mainframe for its highly secure, superior data handling and transaction serving, particularly as digital business adds unpredictability and volatility to workloads.

Overall respondents fell into three primary groups: 1) entrenched mainframe shops, 58% that are on board for the long haul; 2) shops, 23% that intend to maintain a steady amount of work on the mainframe; and 3) the 19% that are moving away from the mainframe.  The first two groups, committed mainframe shops, amount to just over survey 80% of the respondents.

Many companies surveyed are focused on addressing the increased workload demands, especially the rapidly growing demand for new applications. But surprisingly, the survey does not directly touch on hybrid cloud, cognitive computing or any of the latest technologies IBM has been promoting, not even DevOps, which can streamline mainframe application development and deployment. “We are not hearing much about a hybrid cloud environments or blockchain yet. Most companies seem to be in the early tire kicking stage, observed John McKenny, BMC Vice President, Strategy and Operations.

Eighty-eight percent of companies in the first group, entrenched mainframe shops, for example, are looking to increase the workloads they run on Java on the mainframe, primarily to address new application demands. It also doesn’t hurt that Java on the mainframe also can help lower data center costs by directing workloads to lower cost assist processors.

Other interesting BMC survey findings:

  • Half of the respondents report keeping 50% of their data on the mainframe and continue to invest in the platform for reasons you already know—security, availability, data serving capability
  • Continued steady growth of Linux in production on the z: 41% in 2014, 48% in 2015, 52% in 2016
  • Increased use of Java on the mainframe report as 67% of respondents cite need to meet growing application demand

Those looking to reduce mainframe presence cited three reasons: 1) perception of high cost, 2) outdated management understanding, and 3) looking for ways to reduce workloads over time.  DancingDinosaur has spoken with mainframe shops intending to migrate off the z and they cite the usual reasons, especially #1 above.

Top mainframe priorities for 2016 according to the BMC survey:  Cost reduction/optimization (65%); data privacy, compliance, security (50%); application availability (49%); application modernization (41%. Responses indicated the priorities for next year haven’t changed at all.

Surprisingly, many of the latest technologies for the z that IBM has touted recently have not yet shown up in the BMC survey responses, except maybe Java and Linux. This would include hybrid clouds, blockchain, IoT, and cognitive computing. IDC, for example, already is projecting cognitive computing to grow at a CAGR of 55.1% from 2016 to 2020. For z shops, however, cognitive computing appears almost invisible.

In some case with surveys like this you need to read between the lines. Where respondents report changes in activity levels driving application growth or the growth of interest in Java or the frequency of application changes and references to operational analytics they’re making oblique references to mobile or big data or even cognitive computing or other recent technologies for the z.

At its best, the BMC notes that digital technologies are transforming the ways in which mainframe shops conduct business and interact with their customers.  Adds BMC mainframe customer Credit Suisse: “IT departments are moving toward centralized, virtualized, and highly automated environments. This is being pursued to drive cost and processing efficiencies. Many companies realize that the Mainframe has provided these benefits for many years and is a mature and stable environment,” said Frank Cortell, Credit Suisse Director of Information Technology.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

Revamped IBM Power Systems LC Takes on x86

September 9, 2016

To hear IBM, its revamped and refreshed Power Systems LC lineup will undermine x86 (Intel), HPE, Dell/EMC, and any other purveyor of x86-based systems. Backed by accelerators provided by OpenPower community members, IBM appears ready extend the x86 battle to on premises, in the cloud, and the hybrid cloud. It promises to deliver better performance at lower cost for all the hot workloads too: artificial intelligence, deep learning, high performance data analytics, and compute-heavy workloads.

ibm-power-systems-s821lc

Two POWER8 processors, 1U config, priced 30% less than an x86 server

Almost a year ago, Oct. 2015, DancingDinosaur covered IBM previous Power Systems LC announcement here. The LC designation stands for Linux Community, and the company is tapping accelerators and more from the OpenPower community, just as it did with its recent announcement of POWER9 expected in 2017, here.

The new Power LC systems feature a set of community delivered technologies IBM has dubbed POWERAccel, a family of I/O technologies designed to deliver composable system performance enabled by accelerators. For GPU acceleration the NVDIA NVLink delivers nearly 5x better integration between POWER processors and the NVIDIA GPUs.  For FPGA acceleration IBM tapped its own CAPI architecture to integrate accelerators that run natively as part of the application.

This week’s Power Systems LC announcement features three new machines:

  • S821LC (pictured above)—includes 2 POWER8 sockets in a 1U enclosure and intended for environments requiring dense computing.
  • S822LC—brings 2 POWER8 sockets for big data workloads and adds big data acceleration through CAPI and GPUs.
  • S822LC—intended for high performance computing, it incorporates the new POWER8 processor with the NVDIA NVLink to deliver 2.8x the bandwidth to GPU accelerators and up to 4 integrated NVIDIA Pascal GPUs.

POWER8 with NVLink delivers 2.8 x the bandwidth compared to a PCle data pipe. According to figures provided by IBM comparing the price-performance of the Power S822LC for HPC (20-core, 256 GB, 4x Pascal) with a Dell C4130 (20-core, 256 GB 4xK80) and measured by total queries per hour (gph) the Power System delivered 2.1x better price-performance.  The Power Systems server cost more ($66,612) vs. the Dell ($57,615) but the Power System delivered 444 qph vs. Dell’s 185 qph.

The story plays out similarly for big data workloads running MongoDB on the IBM Power S8221LC for big data (20-core, 128 GB) vs. an HP DL380 (20-core, 128 GB). Here the system cost (server, OS, MongoDB annual subscription) came to $24,870 for IBM Power and $29,915 for HP.  Power provided 40% more performance at a 31% lower hardware/maintenance cost.

When it comes to the cloud the new IBM Power Systems LC offerings get even more interesting from a buyer’s standpoint. IBM declared the cloud a strategic imperative about 2 years ago and needs to demonstrate adoption that can rival the current cloud leaders; AWS, Google, and Microsoft (Azure). To that end IBM has started to tack on free cloud usage.

For example, during the industry analyst launch briefing IBM declared: Modernize your Power infrastructure for the Cloud, get access to IBM Cloud for free and cut your current operating costs by 50%. Whether you’re talking on-premises cloud or hybrid infrastructure the freebies just come. The free built-in cloud deployment service options include:

  • Cloud Provisioning and Automation
  • Infrastructure as a Service
  • Cloud Capacity Pools across Data Centers
  • Hybrid Cloud with BlueMix
  • Automation for DevOps
  • Database as a Service

These cover both on-premises, where you can transform your traditional infrastructure with automation, self-service, and elastic consumption models or a hybrid infrastructure where you can securely extend to Public Cloud with rapid access to compute services and API integration. Other freebies include open source automation, installation and configuration recipes, cross data center inventory, performance monitoring via the IBM Cloud, optional DR as a service for Power, and free access and capacity flexibility with SolfLayer (12 month starter pack).

Will the new LC line and its various cloud freebies get the low cost x86 monkey off IBM’s back? That’s the hope in Armonk. The new LC servers can be acquired at a lower price and can deliver 80% more performance per dollar spent over x86-based systems, according to IBM. This efficiency enables businesses and cloud service providers to lower costs and combat data center sprawl.

DancingDinosaur has developed TCO and ROI analyses comparing mainframe and Power systems to x86 for a decade, maybe more.  A few managers get it, but most, or their staff, have embedded bias and will never accept non-x86 machines. To them, any x86 system always is cheaper regardless of the specs and the math. Not sure even free will change their minds.

The new Power Systems LC lineup is price-advantaged over comparatively configured Intel x86-based servers, costing 30% less in some configurations.  Online LC pricing begins at $5999. Additional models with smaller configurations sport lower pricing through IBM Business Partners. All but the HPC machine are available immediately. The HPC machine will ship Sept. 26.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Leads in TBR Private and Hybrid Cloud Surveys

August 4, 2016

IBM has been named number one in private clouds by independent technology market research firm Technology Business Research (TBR) as well as number one in TBR’s hybrid cloud environments survey. Ironically, as fast as IBM has been trying to distance itself from its legacy platform heritage it brings an advantage when it comes to clouds for some customers. “A footprint in legacy IT solutions and management is a strong predictor of private cloud vendor success, as private cloud solutions are typically the first step toward hybrid IT environments,” wrote TBR Cloud Senior Analyst Cassandra Mooshian.

1800FLOWERS Taps IBM Commerce Cloud

Courtesy of IBM: 1800 FLOWERS Taps IBM Cloud

Coming out on top of IBM’s 2Q16 financials reported here, were the company’s strategic initiatives, mainly cloud, analytics, and mobile, which generated positive revenue results. The TBR reports provide welcome reinforcement for IBM strategy doubters. As reported by IBM, the annual run rate for cloud as-a-service revenue — a subset of total cloud revenue — increased to $6.7 billion from $4.5 billion in the second quarter of 2015.  Revenues from analytics increased 5 percent.  Revenues from mobile increased 43 percent while security revenue increased 18 percent.

The TBR report also noted IBM leadership in overall vendor adoption for private cloud and in select private cloud segments due to its broad cloud and IT services portfolio, its variety of deployment options, and accompanying integration and optimization support. As a result, the company’s expertise and knowledge of both cloud and legacy technology make it easier for customers to opt for an IBM migration path to both private and hybrid clouds.

TBR also specifically called out of IBM cloud-friendly capabilities, including the comprehensive portfolio of cloud and hardware assets with security; cloud professional services that can span a customer’s entire IT environment; and a vertical approach to cloud combined with Watson technology. As for hybrid clouds, Kelsey Mason, Cloud Analyst at TBR, noted in the announcement: “Hybrid integration is the next stage in cloud adoption and will be the end state for many enterprise IT environments.” Enterprise hybrid adoption, TBR observed, now matches public adoption of a year ago, which it interprets as signaling a new level of maturity in companies’ cloud strategies.

What really counts, however, are customers who vote with their checkbooks.  Here IBM has been racking up cloud wins. For example, Pratt & Whitney, a United Technologies Corp. company in July announced it will move the engine manufacturer’s business, engineering, and manufacturing enterprise systems to a fully managed and supported environment on the IBM Cloud infrastructure.

Said Brian Galovich, vice president and chief information officer, Pratt & Whitney, in the published announcement:  “Working with IBM and moving our three enterprise systems to a managed cloud service will give us the ability to scale quickly and meet the increased demands for computing services, data processing and storage based on Pratt & Whitney’s forecasted growth over the next decade.

Also in July, Dixons Carphone Group, Europe’s largest telecommunications retail and services company as the result of a 2014 merger, announced plans to migrate to the IBM Cloud from IBM datacenters in the United Kingdom to integrate two distinct infrastructures and enable easy scaling to better manage the peaks and valleys of seasonal shopping trends. Specifically, the company expects to migrate about 2,500 server images from both enterprises with supporting database and middleware components from both infrastructures to an IBM hybrid cloud platform that comprises a private IBM Cloud with bare metal servers for production workloads and public IBM Cloud platform for non-production workloads.

As a merged company it saw an opportunity to consolidate the infrastructures by leveraging cloud solutions for flexibility, performance and cost savings. After assessing the long-term values and scalability of multiple cloud providers, the company turned to IBM Cloud for a smooth transition to a hybrid cloud infrastructure. “We can trust IBM Cloud to seamlessly integrate the infrastructures of both companies into one hybrid cloud that will enable us to continue focusing on other parts of the business,” said David Hennessy, IT Director, Dixons Carphone, in the announcement.

As IBM’s 2Q16 report makes clear, once both these companies might have bought new IBM hardware platforms but that’s not the world today. At least they didn’t opt for AWS or Azure.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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