Posts Tagged ‘IBM Bluemix’

IBM Discounts z/OS Cloud Activity

August 12, 2016

The latest iteration of IBM’s z/OS workload pricing aims at to lower the cost of running cloud workloads.  In a recent announcement, z Systems Workload Pricing for Cloud (zWPC) for z/OS seeks to minimize the impact of new public cloud workload transaction growth on Sub-Capacity license charges. IBM did the same thing with mobile workloads when they started driving up the 4-hour workload averages on the z. As more z workloads interact with public clouds this should start to add up, if it hasn’t already.

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Bluemix Garages in the Cloud

As IBM puts it: zWPC applies to any organization that has implemented Sub-Capacity pricing via the basic AWLC or AEWLC pricing mechanisms for the usual MLC software suspects. These include z/OS, CICS, DB2, IMS, MQ and WebSphere Application Server (WAS).  An eligible transaction is one classified as Public Cloud-originated, connecting to a z/OS hosted transactional service and/or data source via a REST or SOAP web service.  Public cloud workloads are defined as transactions processed by named Public cloud application transactions identified as originating from a recognized Public Cloud offering, including but not limited to, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, IBM Bluemix, and more.

IBM appears to have simplified how you identify eligible workloads. As the company notes: zWPC does not require you to isolate the public cloud work in separate partitions, but rather offers an enhanced way of reporting. The z/OS Workload Manager (WLM) allows clients to use WLM classification rules to distinguish cloud workloads, effectively easing the data collection requirements for public cloud workload transactions.

So how much will you save? It reportedly reduces eligible hourly values by 60 percent. The discount produces an adjusted Sub-Capacity value for each reporting hour. What that translates into on your monthly IBM software invoice once all the calculations and fine print are considered amounts to a guess at this point. But at least you’ll save something. The first billing eligible under this program starts Dec. 1, 2016.

DancingDinosaur expects IBM to eventually follow with discounted z/OS workload pricing for IoT and blockchain transactions and maybe even cognitive activity. Right now the volume of IoT and blockchain activity is probably too low to impact anybody’s monthly license charges. Expect those technologies ramp up in coming years with many industry pundits projecting huge numbers—think billions and trillions—that will eventually impact the mainframe data center and associated software licensing charges.

Overall, Workload License Charges (WLC) constitute a monthly software license pricing metric applicable to IBM System z servers running z/OS or z/TPF in z/Architecture (64-bit) mode.  The driving principle of WLS amounts to pay-for-what-you-use, a laudable concept. In effect it lowers the cost of incremental growth while further reducing software costs by proactively managing associated peak workload utilization.

Generally, DancingDinosaur applauds anything IBM does to lower the cost of mainframe computing.  Playing with workload software pricing in this fashion, however, seems unnecessary. Am convinced there must be simpler ways to lower software costs without the rigmarole of metering and workload distribution tricks. In fact, a small mini-industry has cropped up among companies offering tools to reduce costs, primarily through various ways to redistribute workloads to avoid peaks.

A modification to WLC, the variable WLC (VWLC) called AWLC (Advanced) and the EWLC (Entry), aligns with most of the z machines introduced over the past couple of years.  The result, according to IBM, forms a granular cost structure based on MSU (CPU) capacity that applies to VWLC and associated pricing mechanisms.

From there you can further tweak the cost by deploying Sub-Capacity and Soft Capping techniques.  Defined Capacity (DC), according to IBM, allows the sizing of an LPAR in MSU such that the LPAR will not exceed the designated MSU amount.  Group Capacity Limit (GCL) extends the Defined Capacity principle for a single LPAR to a group of LPARs, allowing MSU resources to be shared accordingly.  BTW, a potential downside of GCL is that is one LPAR in the group can consume all available MSUs due to a rogue transaction. Again, an entire mini industry, or maybe no so mini, has emerged to help handle workload and capacity pricing on the z.

At some point in most of the conference pricing sessions the eyes of many attendees glaze over.  By Q&A time the few remaining pop up holding a copy of a recent invoice and ask what the hell this or that means and what the f$#%@#$ they can do about it.

Have to admit that DancingDinosaur did not attend the most recent SHARE conference, where pricing workshops can get quite energetic, so cannot attest to the latest fallout. Still, the general trend with mobile and now with cloud pricing discounts should be lower costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Continues to Bolster Bluemix PaaS

September 10, 2015

In the last 10 years the industry, led by IBM, has gotten remarkably better at enabling nearly coding-free development. This is important given how critical app development has become. Today it is impossible to launch any product without sufficient app dev support.  At a minimum you need a mobile app and maybe a few micro-services. To that end, since May IBM has spent the summer introducing a series of Bluemix enhancements. Find them here and here and here and here.  DancingDinosaur, at best a mediocre programmer, hasn’t written any code for decades but in this new coding environment he has started to get the urge to participate in a hack-a-thon. Doesn’t that (below) look like fun?

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IBM’s Bluemix Garage in Toronto (click to enlarge)

The essential role of software today cannot be overestimated. Even companies introducing non-technical products have to support them with apps and digital services that must be continually refreshed.  When IoT really starts to ramp up bits and pieces of code everywhere will be needed to handle the disparate pieces, get everything to interoperate, collect the data, and then use it or analyze it and initiate the next action.

Bluemix, a cloud-based PaaS product, comes as close to an all-in-one Swiss army knife development and deployment platform for today’s kind of applications as you will find. Having only played around with a demo it appears about as intuitive as an enterprise-class product can get.

The most recent of IBM’s summer Bluemix announcement promises more flexibility to integrate Java-based resources into Bluemix.  It offers a set of services to more seamlessly integrate Java-based resources into cloud-based applications. For instance, according to IBM, it is now possible to test and run applications in Bluemix with Java 8. Additionally, among other improvements, the jsp-2.3, el-3.0, and jdbc-4.1 Liberty features, previously in beta, are now available as production-ready. Plus, Eclipse Tools for Bluemix now includes JavaScript Debug, support for Node.js applications, Java 8 Liberty for Java integration, and Eclipse Mars support for the latest Eclipse Mars version as well as an improved trust self-signed certificates capability. Incremental publish support for JEE applications also has been expanded to handle web fragment projects.

In mid-August IBM announced the use of streaming analytics and data warehouse services on Bluemix. This should enable developers to expand the capabilities of their applications to give users a more robust cloud experience by facilitating the integration of data analytics and visualization seamlessly in their apps. Specifically, according to IBM, a new streaming analytics capability was put into open beta; the service provides the capability to instantaneously analyze data while scaling to thousands of sources on the cloud. IBM also added MPP (massively parallel processing) capabilities to enable faster query processing and overall scalability. The announcement also introduces built-in Netezza analytics libraries integrated with Watson Analytics, and more.

Earlier in August, IBM announced the Bluemix Garage opening in Toronto (pictured above). Toronto is just the latest in a series coding workspaces IBM intends to open worldwide. Next up appear to be Nice, France and Melbourne, Australia later this year.  According to IBM, Bluemix Garages create a bridge between the scale of enterprises and the culture of startups by establishing physical collaboration spaces housed in the heart of thriving entrepreneurial communities around the world. Toronto marks the third Bluemix Garage. The Toronto Bluemix Garage is located at the DMZ at Ryerson University, described as the top-ranked university-based incubator in Canada. Experts there will mentor the rising numbers of developers and startups in the region to create of the next generation of cloud apps and services using IBM’s Bluemix.

Members of the Toronto Bluemix Garage include Tangerine, a bank based in Canada that is using Bluemix to implement its mobile strategy. Through the IBM Mobile Quality Assurance for Bluemix service, Tangerine gathers customer feedback and actionable insight on its mobile banking app, effectively streamlining its implementation and development processes.

Finally, back in May IBM introduced new Bluemix Services to help developers create analytics-driven cloud applications. Bluemix, according to IBM, is now the largest Cloud Foundry deployment in the world. And the services the company announced promise to make it easier for developers to create cloud applications for mobile, IoT, supply chain analytics, and intelligent infrastructure solutions. The new capabilities will be added to over 100 services already available in the Bluemix catalog.

At the May announcement, IBM reported bringing more of its own technology into Bluemix, including:

  • Bluemix API Management, which allows developers to rapidly create, deploy, and share large-scale APIs and provides a simple and consumable way of controlling critical APIs not possible with simpler connector services
  • New mobile capabilities available on Bluemix for the IBM MobileFirst Platform, which provide the ability to develop location-based mobile apps that connect insights from digital engagement and physical presence

It also announced a handful of ecosystem and third-party services being added into Bluemix, including several that will facilitate working with .NET capabilities. In short, it will enable Bluemix developers to take advantage of Microsoft development approaches, which should make it easier to integrate multiple mixed-platform cloud workloads.

Finally, as a surprise note at the end of the May announcement IBM added that the company’s total cloud revenue—covering public, private and hybrid engagements—was $7.7 billion over the previous 12 months as of the end of March 2015, growing more than 60% in first quarter 2015.  Hope you’ve noticed that IBM is serious about putting its efforts into the cloud and openness. And it’s starting to pay off.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Simplifies Internet of Things with developerWorks Recipes

August 6, 2015

IBM has a penchant for working through communities going back as far as Eclipse and probably before. Last week DancingDinosaur looked at the developerWorks Open community. Now let’s look at the IBM’s developerWorks Recipes community intended to address the Internet of Things (IoT).

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TI SensorTag

The Recipes community  will try to help developers – from novice to experienced – quickly and easily learn how to connect IoT devices to the cloud and how to use data coming from those connected devices. For example one receipe walks you through Connecting the TI Simplelink SensorTag (pictured above) to the IBM IoT foundation service in a few simple step. By following these steps a developer, according to IBM, should be able to connect the SensorTag to the IBM quickstart cloud service in less than 3 minutes. Think of recipes as simplified development patterns—so simple that almost anyone could follow it. (Wanted to try it myself but didn’t have a tag.  Still, it looked straightfoward enough.)

IoT is growing fast. Gartner forecasts 4.9 billion connected things in use in 2015, up 30% from 2014, and will reach 25 billion by 2020. In terms of revenue, this is huge. IDC predicts the worldwide IoT market to grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%. For IT people who figure out how to do this, the opportunity will be boundless. Every organization will want to connect its devices to other devices via IoT. The developerWorks Recipes community seems like a perfect way to get started.

IoT isn’t exactly new. Manufacturers have cobbled together machine-to-machine (M2M) networks Banks and retailers have assembled networks of ATMs and POS terminals. DancingDinosaur has been writing about IoT for mainframe shops for several years.  Now deveoperWorks Recipes promises a way for just about anyone to set up their own IoT easily and quickly while leveraging the cloud in the process. There is a handful of recipes now but it provides a mechanism to add recipes so expect the catalog of recipes to steadily increase. And developers are certain to take existing recipes and improvise on them.

IBM has been trying to simplify  development for cloud, mobile, IoT starting with the launch of Bluemix last year. By helping users connect their IoT devices to IBM Bluemix, which today boasts more than 100 open-source tools and services, users can then run advanced analytics, utilize machine learning, and tap into additional Bluemix services to accelerate the adoption of  IoT and more.

As easy as IBM makes IoT development sound this is a nascent effort industry wide. There is a crying need for standards at every level to facilitate the interoperability and data exchange among the many and disparate devices, networks, and applications that will make up IoT.  Multiple organizations have initiated standards efforts but it will take some time to sort it all out.

And then there is the question of security. In a widely reported experiment by Wired Magazine  hackers were able to gain control of a popular smart vehicle. Given that cars are expected to be a major medium for IoT and every manufacturer is rushing to jam as much smart componentry into their vehicles you can only hope every automaker is  scrambling for security solutions .

Home appliances represent another fat, lucrative market target for manufacturers that want to embed intelligent devices and IoT into their all products. What if hackers access your automatic garage door opener? Or worse yet, what if they turn off your coffee maker and water heater? Could you start the day without a hot shower and cup of freshly brewed coffee and still function?

Running IoT through secure clouds like the IBM Cloud is part of the solution. And industry-specific clouds intended for IoT already are being announced, much like the Internet exchanges of a decade or two ago. Still, more work needs to be done on security and interoperability standards if IoT is to work seamlessly and broadly to achieve the trillions of dollars of economic value projected for it.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

System z Takes BackOffice Role in IBM-Apple Deal

July 21, 2014

DancingDinosaur didn’t have to cut short his vacation and race back last week to cover the IBM-Apple agreement. Yes, it’s a big deal, but as far as System z shops go it won’t have much impact on their data center operations until late this year or 2015 when new mobile enterprise applications apparently will begin to roll out.

The deal, announced last Tuesday, promises “a new class of made-for-business apps targeting specific industry issues or opportunities in retail, healthcare, banking, travel and transportation, telecommunications, and insurance among others,” according to IBM. The mainframe’s role will continue to be what it has been for decades, the backoffice processing workhorse. IBM is not porting iOS to the z or Power or i or any enterprise platform.

Rather, the z will handle transaction processing, security, and data management as it always has. With this deal, however, analytics appears to be assuming a larger role. IBM’s big data and analytics capabilities is one of the jewels it is bringing to the party to be fused with Apple’s legendary consumer experience. IBM expects this combination—big data analytics and consumer experience—to produce apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad devices and ultimately, as IBM puts it, enable companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction—faster and easier than ever before.

In case you missed the point, this deal, or alliance as IBM seems to prefer, is about software and services. If any hardware gets sold as a result, it will be iPhones and iPads. Of course, IBM’s MobileFirst constellation of products and services stand to gain. Mainframe shops have been reporting a steady uptick in transactions originating from mobile devices for several years. This deal won’t slow that trend and might even accelerate it. The IBM-Apple alliance also should streamline and simplify working with and managing Apple’s mobile devices on an enterprise-wide basis.

According to IBM its MobileFirst Platform for iOS will deliver the services required for an end-to-end enterprise capability, from analytics, workflow and cloud storage to enterprise-scale device management, security and integration. Enhanced mobile management includes a private app catalog, data and transaction security services, and a productivity suite for all IBM MobileFirst for iOS offerings. In addition to on premise software solutions, all these services will be available on Bluemix—IBM’s development platform available through the IBM Cloud Marketplace.

One hope from this deal is that IBM will learn from Apple how to design user-friendly software and apply those lessons to the software it subsequently develops for the z and Power Systems. Would be interesting see what Apple software designers might do to simplify using CICS.

Given the increasing acceptance of BYOD when it comes to mobile, data centers will still have to cope with the proliferation of operating systems and devices in the mobile sphere. Nobody is predicting that Android, Amazon, Google, or Microsoft will be exiting the mobile arena as a result, at least not anytime soon.

Finally, a lot of commentators weighed in on who wins or loses in the mobile market. In terms of IBM’s primary enterprise IT competitors Oracle offers the Oracle Mobile Platform. This includes mobile versions of Siebel CRM, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, and a few more. HP offers mobile app development and testing and a set of mobile application services that include planning, architecture, design, build, integration, and testing.

But if you are thinking in terms of enterprise platform winners and losers IBM is the clear winner; the relationship with Apple is an IBM exclusive partnership. No matter how good HP, Oracle, or any of IBM’s other enterprise rivals might be at mobile computing without the tight Apple connection they are at a distinct disadvantage. And that’s before you even consider Bluemix, SoftLayer, MobileFirst, and IBM’s other mobile assets.

BTW, it’s not too early to start planning for IBM Enterprise 2014. Mark your calendar, Oct 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. This event should be heavily z and Power.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter @mainframeblog or at Technologywriter.com.


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