Posts Tagged ‘IBM MobileFirst’

developerWorks Open Reinforces IBM’s Commitment to Open Source Cloud

July 30, 2015

Maybe IBM’s decades-long legacy of proprietary platforms and systems makes people a little hesitant to fully embrace its open source initiatives. Still, IBM has been supporting Linux on the z System for over a decade, the Eclipse initiative for as long or longer, and gives no sign of getting ready to pull the plug on any of its open source initiatives.

Rise of Open Source Linux and OpenStackCourtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

Or take Bluemix, an implementation of IBM’s Open Cloud Architecture based on Cloud Foundry, an open source Platform as a Service (PaaS) initiative. And the company only gets more open source by the day. Just last week IBM continued to pour more open source components into Bluemix. It announced developerWorks Open, a cloud-based environment for developers to not only download open sourced IBM code but also have access to blogs, videos, tools and techniques to accelerate their own efforts on behalf of clients.

The current model of development in the open source community, according to IBM, lacks a strategic focus on business requirements. To address this IBM is launching a set of projects in industries like healthcare, mobile, retail, insurance, and banking that ensure a strategic business focus and address real-world business challenges.

The creation of developerWorks Open, notes IBM, comes at an important time for cloud developers. Organizations are wrestling with getting the most out of their multiple clouds environments. For instance, a developer building cloud applications on Bluemix for an insurance accident claim system likely will require storing videos and repair photos for an insurance accident claim application. The developer may have difficulty making a storage choice and then implementing it. But developerWorks Open helps simplify that choice and provides the reassurance that the choice has industry support.

To that end IBM is offering a broad range of technologies for developerWorks Open that aim to help bridge this perceived development gap and remove the obstacles that inhibit developers from turning open source code into sustainable applications that solve real business issues. IBM will also offer these services on its programming platform for cloud software development, Bluemix. The goal is to remove the obstacles that hinder developers from turning open source code into sustainable enterprise-caliber applications that solve real business issues.

For that reason the company will open source a number of apps from its MobileFirst portfolio (MobileFirst was recently cited by Gartner as a leader in its Magic Quadrant mobile application development segment) that will assist developers in the following markets:

  • IBM Ready App for Healthcare tracks patient progress for at-home physical therapy programs via mobile device.
  • IBM Ready App for Retail personalizes and reshapes the specialty retail store shopping experience through direct line of communication
  • IBM Ready App for Insurance improves the relationship between homeowners and insurers and uses Internet of Things sensors to synch home with utilities.
  • IBM Ready App for Banking helps financial institution’s address the mobile needs business owners and attract prospects.

Additionally, IBM is open sourcing several analytics technologies including:

  • Activity Streams provides developers with a standard model and encoding format for describing how users engage with both the application and with one another.
  • Agentless System Crawler offers a unified cloud monitoring and analytics framework that enables visibility into all types of cloud platforms and runtimes
  • IBM Analytics for Apache Spark puts the full analytics power and capabilities of Spark at the developers fingertips. (Beta now available on Bluemix.)

IBM will also continue to open source cloud data services, including IBM Object Storage on Bluemix Service Broker, which can be used to integrate OpenStack Swift with Cloud Foundry to enable fast access to cloud data without needing to know where the data is stored.

The introduction of developerWorks Open comes at a time when organizations are starting to realize that their software and apps increasingly are their products, especially cloud, mobile, and collaboration apps, and they need a fast and efficient way to build and update them. In other cases, IBM notes, organizations are wrestling with getting the most out of their multiple clouds environments.

IBM is committed to open source; there is no going back. Company executives see it as the foundation of innovative application development in the cloud.  “With developerWorks Open we are open sourcing additional IBM innovations that we feel have the potential to grow the community and ecosystem and eventually become established technologies,” declared IBM Vice President of Cloud Architecture and Technology Dr. Angel Diaz recently.

Currently, IBM participates in and contributes to more than 150 open source projects. These projects include Spark, OpenStack, Cloud Foundry, Open Contain Project, Node.js, CouchDb, Linux, Eclipse and an already established relationship with Apache. As IBM notes, open source projects increase the skills and knowledge base around the company’s software product set. developerWorks Open is the next step in IBM’s strategy to help businesses create, use, and innovate around cloud computing systems. Coming right behind is a similar community initiative for IoT development. Stay tuned.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Real Time Analytics on the IBM z13

June 4, 2015

For years organizations have been putting their analytics on distributed platforms thinking that was the only way to get fast, real-time and predictive analytics. Maybe once but not anymore. Turns out the IBM z System, especially the z13 not only is ideal for real time, predictive analytics but preferable.

IBM today is so bullish on analytics, especially predictive analytics, that last month it introduced 20 pre-built industry-specific predictive analytics solutions. To build these solutions IBM tapped its own experience working on 50,000 engagements but also an array of outside organizations with success in predictive analytics, including Urban Outfitters, National Grid, Deloitte, Bolsa de Santiago, Interactive Data Managed Solutions, and Bendigo and Adelaide Bank, among others.

Web

Courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

The truth of the matter is that without efficient real time, predictive analytics managers get it wrong most of the time when it comes to making operational decisions, said Paul DiMarzio, IBM z Systems Big Data and Analytics Worldwide Portfolio Marketing Manager. He spoke at IBM Edge2015 in a session titled When Milliseconds Matter: Architecting Real-Time Analytics into Operational Systems. His key point: you can do this completely within the IBM z System.

The old notion of sending data to distributed systems someplace else for analytics now appears ridiculous, especially with the introduction of systems like the z13 that can handle operations and perform real time analytics concurrently. It performs analytics fast enough that you can make decisions when the action is still going on. Now the only question is whether we have the right business rules and scoring models. The data already are there and the tools are ready and waiting on the z13.

You start with the IBM SPSS Modeler with Scoring Adapter for zEnterprise. The real time predictive analytics capability delivers better, more profitable decisions at the point of customer impact. For business rules just turn to the IBM Operational Decision Manager for z/OS, which codifies business policies, practices, and regulations.

IBM SPSS improves accuracy by scoring directly within the transactional application against the latest committed data. As such it delivers the performance needed to meet operations SLAs and avoid data governance and security issues, effectively saving network bandwidth, data copying latency, and disk storage.

In addition to SPSS and the Operational Decision Manager the z13 brings many capabilities, some new for the z13 at this point. For starters, the z13 excels as a custodian of the data model, providing an accurate, secure, single copy of information that, according to IBM, ensures veracity of the data necessary for reliable analytics and provides centralized control over decision information.

Specifically, the machine brings SIMD (single instruction multiple data) and the MASS (mathematical acceleration subsystem) and ATLAS (automatically tuned linear algebra software) libraries for z/OS and Linux on z. SIMD enables the same operation to be performed on several data elements at the same time rather than sequentially. MASS and ATLAS help programmers create better and more complex analytic models.

In addition, increases in memory to as much as 10 TB, faster I/O, and simultaneous multi-threading (SMT) generally boost overall throughput of the z13, which will surely benefit any analytics being run on the machine, especially real time, predictive analytics.  In addition, analytics on the z13 gains from deep integration with core systems, the integrated architecture, and its single pane management view.

The latest IBM Red Book on analytics on the z13 sums it up as such: z Systems analytics enables organizations to improve performance and lower cost by bringing the analytic processing to where the data resides. Organizations can therefore maximize their current IT investments while adding functionality and improved price and performance with the z13. And with the new z13 features, applications can gain increased throughput for operational business intelligence (operational BI) and DB2 query workloads, which saves money (hardware, software, labor).

The Red Book suggests the following example: a user with a mobile application signs on and initiates a transaction flow through an IBM MobileFirst Platform Server running on Linux on z. The event goes to an LDAP server on z/OS to validate the user’s sign-on credentials. After successful validation, the transaction then proceeds through the z/OS transaction environment where all of the data resides in DB2 z/OS. IBM CICS transactions also are processed in the same z environment and all of the analysis is performed without moving any data, resulting in extremely fast performance. Sweet.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

Vodafone Spain Picks IBM zSystem for Smarter Cities Initiative

March 19, 2015

The Vodafone initiative, as reported here previously, leverages the most advanced mobile communications technology including citywide sensors and a Global M2M Platform that will enable the connection of thousands of sensors to the intelligent Vodafone Connected City system. The new cloud-based system will run on IBM Linux z Systems. The Linux z Systems were selected for their high security, which protects cloud services while also delivering the speed, availability, and efficiency required to drive mobile services at scale.  To do something at scale you really do want the z System.

 vodafone zsystem running linux

Courtesy of IBM: zSystem and Linux

For Vodafone this represents the beginning of what they refer to as a Smarter Cities services initiative. The effort targets local governments and city councils with populations ranging between 20.000 – 200.000 citizens. The services provided will address customer’s needs in the following key areas: urban vitality, public lighting, energy efficiency, waste management, and citizen communications.

In effect, Vodafone is becoming a SaaS provider by leveraging their new zSystem. Vodafone’s customers for this are the government groups that opt to participate. The company announced the effort at the World Mobile Congress in Barcelona at the beginning of the month.

One of the initial participants will be Seville, the capital of the province of Andalucía, where a control and development center will be established by Vodafone. The telco will invest more than 243 million euros over two years on telecommunications infrastructure, encouraging the development of the technology sector and developing projects to create strategic growth in the region.

Initially, the center will focus on creating smart city solutions that can easily and efficiently be used by cities ranging from 20,000 to 150,000 residents; cities that otherwise may not have the funds to invest in smart city infrastructure projects on their own. This center is also expected to help make the Andalucía territory of Spain a leader in the development of Big Data and smart solutions.

IBM is delivering the full stack to Vodafone: a set of cloud services that include an enterprise zSystem Linux server (IBM zBC12), v7000 storage, IBM intelligent operations, an information services solution, and more.  Vodafone opted for the z and Linux to enable cost-efficient, highly secure cloud services while also delivering the speed, availability and efficiency required to drive mobile services at scale. IBM Intelligent Operations software will provide monitoring and management of city services. IBM’s MobileFirst platform will be used to create citizen-facing mobile applications while IBM Information Server and Maximo asset management software will round out the IBM stack.

Overall, IBM, the zSystem, and Linux brought a number of benefits to this initiative. Specifically, the zSystem proved the least expensive when running more than seven vertical services as Vodafone is planning. An example of such a vertical service is the public lighting of a city. This also is where scalability brings a big advantage. Here again, the zSystem running Linux delivers scalability along with greater security and regulatory compliance. Finally, another critical capability for Vodafone was the zSystem’s ability to isolate workloads.

In short, the zSystem’s security and regulation compliance; reliability, resilience, and robustness; strong encoding and workload isolation, workload management and ability to meet SLAs; scalability; and high efficiency clinched the Vodafone deal.

This could prove a big win for IBM and the zSystem. Vodafone has mobile operations in 26 countries, partners with mobile networks in 54 more, and runs fixed broadband operations in 17 markets. As of the end of 2014, Vodafone had 444 million mobile customers and 11.8 million fixed broadband customers. Vodafone Spain’s 14.811.000 mobile customers and 2.776.000 broadband ones will certainly take maximum advantage of the zSystem’s scalability and reliability.

…as a follow up to last week’s report on recent success coming from the OpenPower Foundation that string continued this week at the OpenPOWER Inaugural Summit with the OpenPOWER Foundation announcing more than ten hardware solutions spanning systems, boards, cards, and a new microprocessor customized for the Chinese market.  Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers.

Among the products and prototypes OpenPOWER members revealed are:

  • Firestone, a prototype of a new high-performance server targeting exascale computing and projected to be 5-10x faster than today’s supercomputers. It incorporate technology from NVIDIA and Mellanox.
  • The first GPU-accelerated OpenPOWER developer platform, the Cirrascale RM4950, resulting from collaboration between NVIDIA, Tyan, and Cirrascale.
  • An open server specification and motherboard mock-up combining OpenPOWER, Open Compute and OpenStack by Rackspace and designed to run OpenStack services.

Other member-developed new products leverage the Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface (CAPI), a hallmark feature built into the POWER architecture. DancingDinosaur initially covered CAPI here.

Reminder: it is time to register for IBM Edge2015 in Las Vegas May 10-15. Edge2015 combines all of IBM’s infrastructure products with both a technical track and an executive track.  You can be sure DancingDinosaur will be there. Watch for upcoming posts here that will highlight some of the more interesting sessions.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

System z Takes BackOffice Role in IBM-Apple Deal

July 21, 2014

DancingDinosaur didn’t have to cut short his vacation and race back last week to cover the IBM-Apple agreement. Yes, it’s a big deal, but as far as System z shops go it won’t have much impact on their data center operations until late this year or 2015 when new mobile enterprise applications apparently will begin to roll out.

The deal, announced last Tuesday, promises “a new class of made-for-business apps targeting specific industry issues or opportunities in retail, healthcare, banking, travel and transportation, telecommunications, and insurance among others,” according to IBM. The mainframe’s role will continue to be what it has been for decades, the backoffice processing workhorse. IBM is not porting iOS to the z or Power or i or any enterprise platform.

Rather, the z will handle transaction processing, security, and data management as it always has. With this deal, however, analytics appears to be assuming a larger role. IBM’s big data and analytics capabilities is one of the jewels it is bringing to the party to be fused with Apple’s legendary consumer experience. IBM expects this combination—big data analytics and consumer experience—to produce apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad devices and ultimately, as IBM puts it, enable companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction—faster and easier than ever before.

In case you missed the point, this deal, or alliance as IBM seems to prefer, is about software and services. If any hardware gets sold as a result, it will be iPhones and iPads. Of course, IBM’s MobileFirst constellation of products and services stand to gain. Mainframe shops have been reporting a steady uptick in transactions originating from mobile devices for several years. This deal won’t slow that trend and might even accelerate it. The IBM-Apple alliance also should streamline and simplify working with and managing Apple’s mobile devices on an enterprise-wide basis.

According to IBM its MobileFirst Platform for iOS will deliver the services required for an end-to-end enterprise capability, from analytics, workflow and cloud storage to enterprise-scale device management, security and integration. Enhanced mobile management includes a private app catalog, data and transaction security services, and a productivity suite for all IBM MobileFirst for iOS offerings. In addition to on premise software solutions, all these services will be available on Bluemix—IBM’s development platform available through the IBM Cloud Marketplace.

One hope from this deal is that IBM will learn from Apple how to design user-friendly software and apply those lessons to the software it subsequently develops for the z and Power Systems. Would be interesting see what Apple software designers might do to simplify using CICS.

Given the increasing acceptance of BYOD when it comes to mobile, data centers will still have to cope with the proliferation of operating systems and devices in the mobile sphere. Nobody is predicting that Android, Amazon, Google, or Microsoft will be exiting the mobile arena as a result, at least not anytime soon.

Finally, a lot of commentators weighed in on who wins or loses in the mobile market. In terms of IBM’s primary enterprise IT competitors Oracle offers the Oracle Mobile Platform. This includes mobile versions of Siebel CRM, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, and a few more. HP offers mobile app development and testing and a set of mobile application services that include planning, architecture, design, build, integration, and testing.

But if you are thinking in terms of enterprise platform winners and losers IBM is the clear winner; the relationship with Apple is an IBM exclusive partnership. No matter how good HP, Oracle, or any of IBM’s other enterprise rivals might be at mobile computing without the tight Apple connection they are at a distinct disadvantage. And that’s before you even consider Bluemix, SoftLayer, MobileFirst, and IBM’s other mobile assets.

BTW, it’s not too early to start planning for IBM Enterprise 2014. Mark your calendar, Oct 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. This event should be heavily z and Power.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter @mainframeblog or at Technologywriter.com.


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