Posts Tagged ‘IBM Watson’

Travelport and IBM launch industry AI travel platform

August 24, 2018

Uh oh, if you have been a little sloppy with travel expenses, it’s time to clean up your travel act before AI starts monitoring your reimbursed travel. IBM and Travelport are teaming up to offer the industry’s first AI-based travel platform to intelligently manage corporate travel spend while leveraging IBM Watson capabilities to unlock previously unavailable data insights.

As IBM explains it, the new travel platform will be delivered via the IBM Cloud and exploits IBM Watson capabilities to intelligently track, manage, predict and analyze travel costs to fundamentally change how companies manage and optimize their travel programs. Typically, each work group submits its own travel expenses and reconciliation and reimbursement can be handled by different groups.

With annual global business travel spend estimated to reach a record $1.2 trillion this year, as projected by the Global Business Travel Association, corporate travel managers need new ways to reduce costs. That requires consolidating and normalizing all the information. Currently for businesses to get a full picture of travel patterns a travel manager might have to sift through data silos from travel agencies, cards, expense systems, and suppliers for end-to-end visibility of spend and compliance across all travel subcategories.  This, however, is usually undertaken from an historical view rather than in real time, which is one reason why reimbursement can take so long. As an independent contractor, DancingDinosaur generally has to submit travel expenses at the end of the project and wait forever for payment.

IBM continues: The new platform, dubbed Travel Manager,  features advanced artificial intelligence, and provides cognitive computing and predictive data analytics using what-if type scenarios, while integrated with travel and expense data to help travel management teams, procurement category managers, business units, finance, and human resource departments optimize their travel program, control spend, and enhance the end-traveler experience.  Maybe they will even squeeze independent contractors into the workflow.

The special sauce in all of this results from how IBM combines data with Travelport, a travel commerce platform on its own, to produce IBM Travel Manager as an AI platform that oversees corporate travel expenses. In the process, IBM Travel Manager gives users complete, unified access to previously siloed information, which, when combined with travel data from the Travelport global distribution system (GDS), can then be used to create real-time predictive analytics recommending how, say, adjustments in travel booking behavior patterns can positively impact a company’s travel budget.

Travelport, itself, is a heavyweight in the travel industry. It relies on technology to make the experience of buying and managing travel better. Through its travel commerce platform it provides distribution, technology, payment and other capabilities for the $7 trillion global travel and tourism industry. The platform facilitates travel commerce by connecting the world’s leading travel providers with online and offline travel buyers in a proprietary (B2B) travel marketplace.

The company helps with all aspects of the travel supply chain from airline merchandising, hotel content and distribution, mobile commerce to B2B payments. Last year its platform processed over $83 billion of travel spend, helping its customers maximize the value of every trip.

IBM Travel Manager combines and normalizes data from diverse sources, allowing for more robust insights and benchmarking than other reporting solutions. It also taps AI to unlock previously unavailable insights from multiple internal and external data sources. The product is expected to be commercially available to customers through both IBM and Travelport.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Commits $1B to Drive Watson into the Mainstream

January 10, 2014

IBM is ready to propel Watson beyond Jeopardy, its initial proof-of-concept, and into mainstream enterprise computing. To that end, it announced plans to spend more than $1 billion on the recently formed Watson business unit, an amount that includes $100 million in venture investments to build an ecosystem of entrepreneurs developing Watson-powered apps.

In addition, companies won’t need racks of Power servers to run Watson. With a series of announcements yesterday IBM unveiled plans to deliver Watson capabilities as business-ready cloud services. The announcement focused on three Watson services: 1)  Watson Discovery Advisor for research and development projects in industries such as pharmaceutical, publishing and biotechnology; 2) Watson Analytics to deliver visualized big data insights based on questions posed in natural language by any business user; and 3) IBM Watson Explorer to more easily uncover and share data-driven insights across the enterprise.

DancingDinosaur has been following Watson since its Jeopardy days. Having long since gotten over the disappointment that Watson didn’t run on the Power side of a hybrid zEnterprise, it turns out that IBM has managed to shrink Watson considerably.  Today Watson runs 24x faster, boasts a 2,400% improvement in performance, and is 90% smaller.  IBM has shrunk Watson from the size of a master bedroom to three stacked pizza boxes, and you don’t even need to locate it in your data center; you can run it in the cloud.

Following the introduction of Watson IBM was slow to build on that achievement. It focused on healthcare and financial services, use-cases that appeared to be no-brainers.  Eventually it experienced success, particularly in healthcare, but the initial customers came slowly and the implementations appeared to be cumbersome.

Watson, at least initially, wasn’t going to be a simple deployment. It needed a ton of Power processors. It also needed massive amounts of data; in healthcare IBM collected what amounted to the entire library of the world’s medical research and knowledge. And it needed applications that took advantage of Watson’s formidable yet unusual capabilities.

The recent announcements of delivering Watson via the cloud and committing to underwrite application developers definitely should help. And yesterday’s announcement of what amounts to three packaged Watson services should speed deployment.

For example, Watson Analytics, according to IBM, removes common impediments in the data discovery process, enabling business users to quickly and independently uncover new insights in their data. Using sophisticated analytics and aided by Watson’s natural language interface, Watson Analytics automatically prepares the data, finds the most important relationships, and presents the results in an easy to interpret interactive visual format. As a result, business users are no longer limited to predefined views or static data models. Better yet, they can feel empowered to apply their own knowledge of the business to ask and answer new questions as they emerge. They also will be able to quickly understand and make decisions based on Watson Analytics’ data-driven visualizations.

Behind the new Watson services lies IBM Watson Foundations, described as a comprehensive, integrated set of big data and analytics capabilities that enable enterprises to find and capitalize on actionable insights. Basically, it amounts to a set of user tools and capabilities to tap into all relevant data – regardless of source or type – and run analytics to gain fresh insights in real-time. And it does so securely across any part of an enterprise, including revenue generation, marketing, finance, risk, and operations.  Watson Foundations also includes business analytics with predictive and decision management capabilities, information management with in-memory and stream computing, and enterprise content management packaged into modular offerings. As such it enables organizations of any size to address immediate needs for decision support, gain sustainable value from their initial investments, and grow from there.

This apparently sounded good to Singapore’s DBS Bank, which will deploy Watson cognitive computing capabilities to deliver a next- generation client experience.  For starters, DBS intends to apply Watson to its wealth management business to improve the advice and experience delivered to affluent customers.  The bank is counting on cloud-based Watson to process enormous amounts of information with the ability to understand and learn from each interaction at unprecedented speed. This should greatly increase the bank’s ability to quickly analyze, understand and respond to the vast amounts of data it is accumulating.

Specifically, DBS will deploy IBM’s cloud-based Watson Engagement Advisor solution, to be rolled out in the second half of the year. From there the bank reportedly plans to progressively deploy these capabilities to its other businesses over time.

For fans of cognitive computing and Watson, the announcements represent a much awaited evolution in IBM’s strategy. It promises to make cognitive computing and the natural language power of Watson usable for mainstream enterprises. How excited fans should get, however, depends on the specifics of IBM’s pricing and packaging for these offerings.  Still, faced with having to recoup a $1 billion investment, don’t expect loss-leader pricing from IBM.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog


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