Posts Tagged ‘Jenkins’

Compuware Brings the Mainframe to AWS

October 6, 2017

IBM talks about the power of the cloud for the mainframe and has turned Bluemix into a cloud development and deployment platform for open systems. Where’s the Z?

Now Compuware has made for the past several years quarterly advances in its mainframe tooling, which are now  available through AWS. Not only have those advances made mainframe management and operations more intuitive and graphical through a string of Topaz releases, but with AWS it is now more accessible from anywhere. DancingDinosaur has been reporting on Compuware’s string of Topaz advances for two years, here, here, and here.

By tapping the power of both the cloud and the mainframe, enterprises can deploy Topaz to their global development workforce in minutes, accelerating the modernization of their mainframe environments. As Compuware noted: mainframe shops now have the choice of deploying Topaz on-premise or on AWS. By leveraging the cloud, they can deploy Topaz more quickly, securely, and scale without capital costs while benefiting from new Topaz features as soon as the company delivers them.

To make Topaz work on AWS Compuware turned to Amazon AppStream 2.0 technology, which provides for global development, test, and ops teams with immediate and secure cloud access to Compuware’s entire innovative mainframe Agile/DevOps solution stack, mainly Topaz. Amazon AppStream 2.0 is a fully managed, secure application streaming service that allows users to stream desktop applications from AWS to any device running a web browser.

Cloud-based deployment of Topaz, Compuware notes, allows for significantly faster implementation, simple administration, a virtual integrated development environment (IDE), adaptive capacity, and immediate developer access to software updates. The last of these is important, since Compuware has been maintaining a quarterly upgrade release schedule, in effect delivering new capabilities every 90 days.

Compuware is in the process of patenting technology to offer an intuitive, streamlined configuration menu that leverages AWS best practices to make it easy for mainframe admins to quickly configure secure connectivity between Topaz on AWS and their mainframe environment. It also enables the same connectivity to their existing cross-platform enterprise DevOps toolchains running on-premise, in the cloud, or both. The upshot: organizations can deploy Topaz across their global development workforce in minutes, accelerating the modernization of their mainframe environments.

Using Topaz on AWS, notes Compuware, mainframe shops can benefit in a variety of ways, specifically:

  • Modify, test and debug COBOL, PL/I, Assembler and other mainframe code via an Eclipse-based virtual IDE
  • Visualize complex and/or undocumented application logic and data relationships
  • Manage source code and promote artifacts through the DevOps lifecycle
  • Perform common tasks such as job submission, review, print and purge
  • Leverage a single data editor to discover, visualize, edit, compare, and protect mainframe files and data

The move to the Eclipse-based IDE presents a giant step for traditional mainframe shops trying to modernize. Eclipse is a leading open source IDE with IBM as a founding member. In addition to Eclipse, Compuware also integrates with other modern tools, including Jenkins, SonarSource, Altassian. Jenkins is an open source automation server written in Java that helps to automate the non-human part of software development process with continuous integration while facilitating technical aspects of continuous delivery. SonarSource enables visibility into mainframe application quality. Atlassian develops products for software developers, project managers, and content management and is best known for Jira, its issue tracking application.

Unlike many mainframe ISVs, Compuware has been actively partnering with various innovative vendors to extend the mainframe’s tool footprint and bring the kind of tools to the mainframe that young developers, especially Millennials, want. Yes, it is possible to access the sexy REST-based Web and mobile tools through IBM’s Bluemix, but for mainframe shops it appears kludgy. By giving its mainframe customers access through AWS to advanced tools, Compuware improves on this. And AWS beats Bluemix in terms of cloud penetration and low cost.

All mainframe ISVs should make their mainframe products accessible through the cloud if they want to keep their mainframe products relevant. IBM has its cloud; of course there is AWS, Microsoft has Azure, and Google rounds out the top four. These and others will keep cloud economics competitive for the foreseeable future. Hope to see you in the cloud.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Latest Compuware Tools Bring Mainframe and DevOps Together

July 7, 2017

At the end of June Compuware announced the integration of Topaz for Total Test, an automated unit testing tool for COBOL, with Jenkins, SonarQube and Compuware ISPW. Together, the technologies enable enterprises nimbly, easily and efficiently update their core mainframe applications in response to ever-changing business requirements.  This continues the company’s ongoing quarterly releases of updates and modernization of mainframe tools.

The latest enable mainframe legacy technologies to participate in integrated modern DevOps. They allow enterprise IT to better orchestrate changes to mainframe systems of record with changes to systems of engagement—a significant benefit given the fact that customer-facing digital services often rely on code running across multiple platforms, legacy and distributed.

Compuware Topaz for Total Test

The days when a mainframe shop can get by with leisurely updates of their systems, especially their business critical applications, are long gone.  Organizations need to modernize and integrate their tools to deliver the kind of fast response attributed to DevOps.

Of course, successful DevOps, whether mainframe or distributed, is less a matter of tools than of culture, communication, and process.  Still, there’s no doubt that modern, integrated, and context-aware tools along with automation help by speeding the process and reducing mistakes.

Topaz for Total Test appears to cover all the tool bases. It brings together automated unit testing for COBOL with Jenkins, SonarQube, and Compuware ISPW. Jenkins is an open-source continuous integration software tool written in the Java for testing and reporting on isolated changes in a larger code base in real time. The real time aspect is critical for DevOps, where speed counts. The software enables developers to find and solve defects in a code base rapidly and to automate testing of their builds. SonarQube (formerly Sonar[1]) is an open source platform for continuous inspection of code quality. Again, error elimination counts.

The problem, as Compuware sees it, comes from mainframe shops’ historical inability to update their business-critical COBOL applications fast enough due to antiquated tools, excessive dependence on specialized expertise, and risk concerns. All these combine to produce long delays in updating code.

The addition of Jenkins and SonarQube along with Compuware’s ISPW source code management and deployment produce a pretty complete DevOps package for mainframes. In addition, Compuware strengthened support for DB2. That support entails new stubbing for DB2 databases, which allows developers to run unit tests without requiring an active connection to a live DB2 database. While Topaz for Total Test can be used to test code that processes all types of mainframe data, its stubbing capability for DB2 but also VSAM and QSAM data types. This makes it easier to create repeatable tests fast. Data stubs are created automatically and do not require re-compiling.

Although much of the world’s business activity still revolves in one way or another around the mainframe, many mainframe shops struggle when it comes to updating those applications to reflect rapidly changing business demands. Typically, they are hampered by manual development and testing processes; ongoing loss of specialized COBOL programming knowledge; and the fear of introducing even the slightest defect into core mainframe systems of record, notes Compuware.

And it gets worse. “Given the abject failure of re-platforming initiatives, large enterprises hoping to avoid digital irrelevance must aggressively modernize their mainframe DevOps practices,” said Rich Ptak of IT analyst firm Ptak Associates in Compuware’s Topaz for Total Test announcement. “Key to the modernization and ‘de-legacing’ of mainframe applications is the adoption of unit testing for COBOL code that is equivalent to and well-integrated with unit testing as practiced across the rest of the enterprise codebase.”

Compuware Topaz for Total Test transforms mainframe application development by automatically breaking COBOL code down into units and creating tests for those logical units. Developers at all skill levels—not just mainframe cowboys but preferably those with distributed and open system skills or even systems novices—can quickly and easily perform unit testing on COBOL code just as they do in Java, PHP and other popular programming languages. In fact, Topaz is actually more advanced than typical Java tools, because it requires no coding and automatically generates default unit test result assertions for developers.  So yes, novices are welcome.

With the recently released integrations and enhancements, Compuware has now delivered mainframe innovations for eleven consecutive quarters. Few mainframe shops even try to do this, not even IBM. This reflects Compuware’s commitment to improving innovation throughput and quality using the latest Agile and DevOps methods.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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