Posts Tagged ‘Kubernetes’

IBM’s Multicloud Manager for 2nd Gen Hybrid Clouds

November 15, 2018

A sign that IBM is serious about hybrid cloud is its mid-October announcement of its new Multicloud Manager, which promises an operations console for companies as they increasingly incorporate public and private cloud capabilities with existing on-premises business systems. Meanwhile, research from Ovum suggests that 80 percent of mission-critical workloads and sensitive data are still running on business systems located on-premises.

$1 Trillion or more hybrid cloud market by 2020

Still, the potential of the hybrid cloud market is huge, $1 trillion or more within just a few years IBM projects. If IBM found itself crowded out by the big hyperscalers—AWS, Google, Microsoft—in the initial rush to the cloud, it is hoping to leapfrog into the top ranks with the next generation of cloud, hybrid clouds.

And this exactly what Red Hat and IBM hope to gain together.  Both believe they will be well positioned to accelerate hybrid multi-cloud adoption by tapping each company’s leadership in Linux, containers, Kubernetes, multi-cloud management, and automation as well as leveraging IBM’s core of large enterprise customers by bringing them into the hybrid cloud.

The result should be a mixture of on premises, off prem, and hybrid clouds. It also promises to be based on open standards, flexible modern security, and solid hybrid management across anything.

The company’s new Multicloud Manager runs on its IBM Cloud Private platform, which is based on Kubernetes container orchestration technology, described as an open-source approach for ‘wrapping’ apps in containers, and thereby making them easier and cheaper to manage across different cloud environments – from on-premises systems to the public cloud. With Multicloud Manager, IBM is extending those capabilities to interconnect various clouds, even from different providers, creating unified systems designed for increased consistency, automation, and predictability. At the heart of the new solution is a first-of-a-kind dashboard interface for effectively managing thousands of Kubernetes applications and spanning huge volumes of data regardless of where in the organization they are located.

Adds Arvind Krishna, Senior Vice President, IBM Hybrid Cloud: “With its open source approach to managing data and apps across multiple clouds” an enterprise can move beyond the productivity economics of renting computing power to fully leveraging the cloud to invent new business processes and enter new markets.

This new solution should become a driver for modernizing businesses. As IBM explains: if a car rental company uses one cloud for its AI services, another for its bookings system, and continues to run its financial processes using on-premises computers at offices around the world, IBM Multicloud Manager can span the company’s multiple computing infrastructures enabling customers to book a car more easily and faster by using the company’s mobile app.

Notes IDC’s Stephen Elliot, Program Vice President:  “The old idea that everything would move to the public cloud never happened.” Instead, you need multicloud capabilities that reduce the risks and deliver more automation throughout these cloud journeys.

Just last month IBM announced a number of companies are starting down the hybrid cloud path by adopting IBM Cloud Private. These include:

New Zealand Police, NZP, is exploring how IBM Cloud Private and Kubernetes containers can help to modernize its existing systems as well as quickly launch new services.

Aflac Insurance is adopting IBM Cloud Private to enhance the efficiency of its operations and speed up the development of new products and services.

Kredi Kayıt Bürosu (KKB) provides the national cloud infrastructure for Turkey’s finance industry. Using IBM Cloud Private KKB expects to drive innovation across its financial services ecosystem.

Operating in a multi-cloud environment is becoming the new reality to most organizations while vendors rush to sell multi-cloud tools. Not just IBM’s Multicloud Manager but HPE OneSphere, Right Scale Multi-Cloud platform, Data Dog Cloud Monitoring, Ormuco Stack, and more.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

IBM Takes Red Hat for $34 Billion

November 2, 2018

“The acquisition of Red Hat is a game-changer. It changes everything about the cloud market,” declared Ginni Rometty, IBM Chairman. At a cost of $34 billion, 10x Red Hat’s gross revenue, it had better be a game changer. See IBM’s announcement earlier this week here.

IBM Multicloud Manager Dashboard

IBM has been hot on the tail of the top three cloud hyperscalers—AWS, Google, and Microsoft/Azure. Will this change the game? Your guess is as good as anyone’s.

The hybrid cloud market appears to be IBM’s primary target. As the company put it: “IBM will become the world’s #1 hybrid cloud provider, offering companies the only open cloud solution that will unlock the full value of the cloud for their businesses.” IBM projects the value of the hybrid cloud market at $1 trillion within a few years!

Most companies today are only 20 percent along their cloud journey, renting compute power to cut costs. The next chapter of the cloud, noted Rometty, requires shifting business applications to hybrid cloud, extracting more data, and optimizing every part of the business.

Nobody has a lock on this market yet. Not IBM, not Red Hat, not VMware, but one thing seems clear; whoever wins will involve open source.  Red Hat, with $3 billion in open source revenue has proven that open source can pay. The only question is how quickly it can pay back IBM’s $34 billion bet.

What’s needed is something that promotes data portability and applications across multiple clouds, data security in a multi-cloud environment, and consistent cloud management. This is the Red Hat and IBM party line.  Both believe they will be well positioned to address these issues to accelerate hybrid multi-cloud adoption. To succeed at this, the new entity will have to tap their leadership in Linux, containers, Kubernetes, multi-cloud management, and automation.

IBM first brought Linux to the Z 20 years ago, making IBM an early advocate of open source, collaborating with Red Hat to help grow enterprise-class Linux.  More recently the two companies worked to bring enterprise Kubernetes and hybrid cloud solutions to the enterprise. These innovations have become core technologies within IBM’s $19 billion hybrid cloud business.

The initial announcement made the point Red Hat will join IBM’s Hybrid Cloud team as a distinct unit, as IBM described, preserving the independence and neutrality of Red Hat’s open source development heritage and commitment, current product portfolio, go-to-market strategy, and unique development culture. Also Red Hat will continue to be led by Jim Whitehurst and Red Hat’s current management team.

That camaraderie lasted until the Q&A following the announcement, when a couple of disagreements arose following different answers on relatively trivial points. Are you surprised? Let’s be clear, nobody spends $34 billion on a $3 billion asset and gives it a completely free hand. You can bet IBM will be calling the shots on everything it is feels is important. Would you do less?

Dharmesh Thakker, a contributor to Forbes, focused more on Red Hat’s OpenShift family of development software. These tools make software developers more productive and are helping transform how software is created and implemented across most enterprises today. So “OpenShift is likely the focus of IBM’s interest in Red Hat” he observes.

A few years ago, he continued, the pendulum seemed to shift from companies deploying more-traditional, on-premises datacenter infrastructure to using public cloud vendors, mostly Amazon. In the last few years, he continued, we’ve seen most mission-critical apps inside companies continue to run on a private cloud but modernized by agile tools and microservices to speed innovation. Private cloud represents 15-20% of datacenter spend, Thakker reports, but the combo of private plus one or more public clouds – hybrid cloud—is here to stay, especially for enterprises. Red Hat’s OpenShift technology enables on-premises, private cloud deployments, giving IBM the ability to play in the hybrid cloud.

IBM isn’t closing this deal until well into 2019; expect to hear more about this in the coming months.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

 

 

 

IBM Expands and Enhances its Cloud Offerings

June 15, 2018

IBM announced 18 new availability zones in North America, Europe, and Asia Pacific to bolster its IBM Cloud business and try to keep pace with AWS, the public cloud leader, and Microsoft. The new availability zones are located in Europe (Germany and UK), Asia-Pacific (Tokyo and Sydney), and North America (Washington, DC and Dallas).

IBM cloud availability zone, Dallas

In addition, organizations will be able to deploy multi-zone Kubernetes clusters across the availability zones via the IBM Cloud Kubernetes Service. This will simplify how they deploy and manage containerized applications and add further consistency to their cloud experience. Furthermore, deploying multi-zone clusters will have minimal impact on performance, about 2 ms latency between availability zones.

An availability zone, according to IBM, is an isolated instance of a cloud inside a data center region. Each zone brings independent power, cooling, and networking to strengthen fault tolerance. While IBM Cloud already operates in nearly 60 locations, the new zones add even more capacity and capability in these key centers. This global cloud footprint becomes especially critical as clients look to gain greater control of their data in the face of tightening data regulations, such as the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). See DancingDinosaur June 1, IBM preps z world for GDPR.

In its Q1 earnings IBM reported cloud revenue of $17.7bn over the past year, up 22 percent over the previous year, but that includes two quarters of outstanding Z revenue that is unlikely to be sustained,  at least until the next Z comes out, which is at least a few quarters away.  AWS meanwhile reported quarterly revenues up 49 percent to $5.4 billion, while Microsoft recently reported 93 percent growth for Azure revenues.

That leaves IBM trying to catch up the old fashioned way by adding new cloud capabilities, enhancing existing cloud capabilities, and attracting more clients to its cloud capabilities however they may be delivered. For example, IBM announced it is the first cloud provider to let developers run managed Kubernetes containers directly on bare metal servers with direct access to GPUs to improve the performance of machine-learning applications, which is critical to any AI effort.  Along the same lines, IBM will extend its IBM Cloud Private and IBM Cloud Private for Data and middleware to Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform and Certified Containers. Red Hat already is a leading provider of enterprise Linux to Z shops.

IBM has also expanded its cloud offerings to support the widest range of platforms. Not just Z, LinuxONE, and Power9 for Watson, but also x86 and a variety of non-IBM architectures and platforms. Similarly, notes IBM, users have gotten accustomed to accessing corporate databases wherever they reside, but proximity to cloud data centers still remains important. Distance to data centers can have an impact on network performance, resulting in slow uploads or downloads.

Contrary to simplifying things, the propagation of more and different types of clouds and cloud strategies complicate an organization’s cloud approach. Already, today companies are managing complex, hybrid public-private cloud environments. At the same time, eighty percent of the world’s data is sitting on private servers. It just is not practical or even permissible in some cases to move all the data to the public cloud. Other organizations are run very traditional workloads that they’re looking to modernize over time as they acquire new cloud-native skills. The new IBM cloud centers can host data in multiple formats and databases including DB2, SQLBase, PostreSQL, or NoSQL, all exposed as cloud services, if desired.

The IBM cloud centers, the company continues, also promise common logging and services between the on-prem environment and IBM’s public cloud environment. In fact, IBM will make all its cloud services, including the Watson AI service, consistent across all its availability zones, and offer multi-cluster support, in effect enabling the ability to run workloads and do backups across availability zones.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.

BMC’s 12th Annual Mainframe Survey Shows Z Staying Power

November 17, 2017

ARM processors are invading HPC and supercomputer segments. The Power9 is getting closer and closer to general commercial availability. IBM unveiled not one but two new quantum computers. Meanwhile, the Z continues to roll right along without skipping a beat, according to BMC’s 12th mainframe survey.

There is no doubt that the computing landscape is changing dramatically and will continue to change. Yet mainframe shops appear to be taking it all in stride. As Mark Wilson reported on the recently completed SHARE Europe conference in the UK, citing the keynote delivered by Compuware’s CEO Chris O’Malley: “By design, the post-modern mainframe is the most future ready platform in the world: the most reliable, securable, scalable, and cost efficient. Unsurprisingly, the mainframe remains the dominant, growing, and vital backbone for the worldwide economy. However, outdated processes and tools ensnared in an apathetic culture doggedly resistant to change, prevent far too many enterprises from unleashing its unique technical virtues and business value.”  If you doubt we are entering the post-modern mainframe era just look at the LinuxONE Emperor II or the z14.

Earlier this month BMC released its 12th annual mainframe survey. Titled 5 Myths Busted, you can find the report here.  See these myths right below:

  • Myth 1: Organizations have fully optimized mainframe availability
  • Myth 2: The mainframe is in maintenance mode; no one is modernizing
  • Myth 3: Executives are planning to replace their mainframes
  • Myth 4: Younger IT professionals are pessimistic about mainframe careers
  • Myth 5: People working on the mainframe today are all older

Everyone from prestigious executives like O’Malley to a small army of IBMers to lowly bloggers and analysts like DancingDinosaur have been pounding away at discrediting these myths for years. And this isn’t the first survey to thoroughly discredit mainframe skeptics.

The mainframe is growing: 48% of respondents saw MIPS growth in the last 12 months, over 50% of respondents forecast MIPS growth in the next 12 months, and 71% of large shops (10,000 MIPS or more) experienced MIPS growth in the last year. Better yet, these same shops forecast more growth in the next 12 months.

OK, the top four priorities of respondents remained the same this year. The idea that mainframe shops, however, are fully optimized and just cruising is dead wrong. Survey respondents still have a list of to-do of priorities:

  1. Cost reduction/optimization
  2. Data privacy/compliance
  3. Availability
  4. Application modernization

Maybe my favorite myth is that younger people have given up on the mainframe. BMC found that 53% of respondents are under age 50 and of this group, (age 30-49 with under 10 years of experience) overwhelmingly report a very positive view of the the mainframe future. The majority went so far as to say they see the workload of their mainframe growing and also view the mainframe as having a strong position of growth in the industry overall. This is reinforced by the growth of IBM’s Master of the Mainframe competition, which attracts young people in droves, over 85,000 to date, to work with the so-called obsolete mainframe.

And the mainframe, both the Z and the LinuxONE, is packed with technology that will continue to attract young people: Linux, Docker, Kubernetes, Java, Spark, and support for a wide range of both relational databases like DB2 and NoSQL databases like MongoDB. They use this technology to do mobile, IoT, blockchain, and more. Granted most mainframe shops are not ready yet to run these kinds of workloads. IBM, however, even introduced new container pricing for the new Z to encourage such workloads.

John McKenny, BMC’s VP of Strategy, has noticed growing interest in new workloads. “Yes, they continue to be mainly transactional applications but they are aimed to support new digital workloads too, such as doing business with mobile devices,” he noted.  Mobility and analytics, he added, are used increasingly to improve operations, and just about every mainframe shop has some form of cloud computing, often multiple clouds.

The adoption of Linux on the mainframe a decade ago imediatey put an end to the threat posed by x86. Since then, IBM has become a poster child for open source and a slew of new technologies, from Java to Hadoop to Spark to whatever comes next. Although traditional mainframe data centers have been slow to adopt these new technologies some are starting, and that along with innovative machines like the z14 and LinuxONE Emperor ll are what, ultimately, will keep the mainframe young and competitive.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM 3Q17 Results Break Consecutive Quarters Losing Streak

November 2, 2017

DancingDinosaur generally does not follow the daily gyrations of IBM’s stock, assuming that readers like you are not really active investors in the company’s stock. That is not to say, however, that you don’t have an important, even critical interest in the company’s fortunes.  As users of Z or Power systems, you want to know that IBM has the means to continue to invest in and advance your preferred platform.  And a 20+ consecutive quarters losing streak doesn’t exactly inspire confidence.

What is interesting about IBM’s latest 3Q17 financials, which ends the string of consecutive revenue losses, is the performance of the Z and storage, two things most of us are concerned with.

Blockchain simplifies near real-time clearing and settlement

Here is what Martin Schroeter, IBM Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer said to the investment analysts he briefs: In Systems, we had strong growth driven by the third consecutive quarter of growth in storage, and a solid launch of our new z14 mainframe, now just called Z, which was available for the last two weeks of the quarter.

DancingDinosaur has followed the mainframe for several decades at least, and the introduction of a new mainframe always boosts revenue for the next quarter or two. The advantages were apparent on Day 1 when the machine was introduced. As DancingDinosaur wrote: You get this encryption automatically, virtually for free. IBM insists it will deliver the z14 at the same price/performance of the z13 or less. The encryption is built into the cost of silicon out of the box.

A few months later IBM introduced a new LinuxOne mainframe, the Emperor II. The new LinuxOne doesn’t yet offer pervasive encryption but provides Secure Service Containers. As it was described here at that time: Through the Secure Service Container data can be protected against internal threats at the system level even from users with elevated credentials or hackers who obtain a user’s credentials, as well as external threats.

Software developers will benefit by not having to create proprietary dependencies in their code to take advantage of these security capabilities. An application only needs to be put into a Docker container for Secure Service Container deployment. The application can be managed using the Docker and Kubernetes tools that are included to make Secure Service Container environments easy to deploy and use. Again, it will likely take a few quarters for LinuxONE shops and other Linux shops to seek out the Emperor II and Secure Service Containers.

Similarly, in recent weeks, IBM has been bolstering its storage offerings. As Schroeter noted, storage, including Spectrum storage and Flash, have been experiencing a few positive quarters and new products should help to continue that momentum. For example, products like IBM Spectrum Protect Plus promises to make data protection available in as little as one hour.

Or the IBM FlashSystem 900, introduced at the end of October promises to deliver efficient, ultra dense flash with CAPEX and OPEX savings due to 3x more capacity in a 2U enclosure. It also offers to maximize efficiency using inline data compression with no application performance impact as it achieves consistent 95 microsecond response times.

But probably the best 3Q news came from the continuing traction IBM’s strategic imperatives are gaining. Here these imperatives—cloud, security, cognitive computing—continue to make a serious contribution to IBM revenue. Third-quarter cloud revenues increased 20 percent to $4.1 billion.  Cloud revenue over the last 12 months was $15.8 billion, including $8.8 billion delivered as-a-service and $7.0 billion for hardware, software and services to enable IBM clients to implement comprehensive cloud solutions.  The annual exit run rate for as-a-service revenue increased to $9.4 billion from $7.5 billion in the third quarter of 2016.  In the quarter, revenues from analytics increased 5 percent.  Revenues from mobile increased 7 percent and revenues from security increased 51 percent. Added Schroeter: Revenue from our strategic imperatives over the last 12 months was also up 10% to $34.9 billion, and now represents 45% of IBM.

OK, so IBM is no longer a $100 + billion company and hasn’t been for some time. Maybe in a few years if blockchain and the strategic imperatives continue to grow and quantum catches fire it may be back over the $100 billion mark, but not sure how much it matters.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Meet the new IBM LinuxONE Emperor II

September 15, 2017

Early this week IBM introduced the newest generation of the LinuxONE, the IBM LinuxONE Emperor II, built on the same technology as the IBM z14, which DancingDinosaur covered on July 19. The key feature of the new LinuxONE Emperor II, is IBM Secure Service Container, presented as an exclusive LinuxONE technology representing a significant leap forward in data privacy and security capabilities. With the z14 the key capability was pervasive encryption. This time the Emperor II promises very high levels of security and data privacy assurance while rapidly addressing unpredictable data and transaction growth. Didn’t we just hear a story like this a few weeks ago?

IBM LinuxONE Emperor (not II)

Through the IBM Secure Service Container, for the first time data can be protected against internal threats at the system level from users with elevated credentials or hackers who obtain a user’s credentials, as well as external threats. Software developers will benefit by not having to create proprietary dependencies in their code to take advantage of these security capabilities. An application only needs to be put into a Docker container to be ready for Secure Service Container deployment. The application can be managed using the Docker and Kubernetes tools that are included to make Secure Service Container environments easy to deploy and use.

The Emperor II and the LinuxONE are being positioned as the premier Linux system for highly secured data serving. To that end, it promises:

  • Ultimate workload isolation and pervasive encryption through Secure Service Containers (SoD)
  • Encryption of data at rest without application change and with better performance than x86
  • Protection of data in flight over the network with full end-to-end network security
  • Use of Protected Keys to secure data without giving up performance
  • Industry-leading secure Java performance via TLS (2-3x faster than Intel)

With the z14 you got this too, maybe worded slightly differently.

In terms of performance and scalability, IBM promises:

  • Industry-leading performance of Java workloads, up to 50% faster than Intel
  • Vertical scale to 170 cores, equivalent to hundreds of x86 cores
  • Simplification to make the most of your Linux skill base and speed time to value
  • SIMD to accelerate analytics workloads & decimal compute (critical to financial applications)
  • Pause-less garbage collection to enable vertical scaling while maintaining predictable performance

Like the z14, the Emperor II also lays a foundation for data serving and next gen apps, specifically:

  • Adds performance and security to new open source DBaaS deployments
  • Develops new blockchain applications based on the proven IBM Blockchain Platform—in terms of security, blockchain may prove more valuable than even secure containers or pervasive encryption
  • Support for data-in-memory applications and new workloads using 32 TB of memory—that’s enough to run production databases entirely in memory (of course, you’ll have to figure out if the increased performance, which should be significant, is worth the extra memory cost)
  • A build-your-cloud approach for providers wanting a secure, scalable, open source platform

If you haven’t figured it out yet, IBM sees itself in a titanic struggle with Intel’s x86 platform.  With the LinuxONE Emperor II IBM senses it can gain the upper hand with certain workloads. Specifically:

  • EAL 5+ isolation, best in class crypto key protection, and Secure Service Containers
  • 640 Power cores in its I/O channels (that aren’t included in the core count) giving the platform the best I/O capacity and performance in the industry
  • Its shared memory, vertical scale architecture delivers a measurably better architecture for stateful workloads like databases and systems of record
  • The LinuxONE/z14 hardware designed to still give good response time at up to 100% utilization, which simplifies the solution and reduces the extra costs many data centers assume are necessary because they’re used to 50% utilization
  • The Emperor II can be ordered designed and tested for earthquake resistance
  • The z-based LinuxONE infrastructure has survived fire and flood scenarios where all other server infrastructures have failed

That doesn’t mean, however, the Emperor II is a Linux no brainer, even for shops facing pressure around security compliance, never-fail mission critical performance, high capacity, and high performance. Change is hard and there remains a cultural mindset based on the lingering myth of the cheap PC of decades ago.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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