Posts Tagged ‘Linux Foundation’

IBM Blockchain Platform Aims for Immutable Accuracy

August 25, 2017

Earlier this week IBM announced a major blockchain collaboration among group of leading companies across the global food supply chain. The goal is to reduce the number of people falling ill or even dying from eating contaminated food. IBM’s solution is its blockchain platform, which it believes is ideally suited to help address these challenges because it establishes a trusted environment that tracks all transactions, an accurate, consistent, immutable version.

Blockchain can improve food traceability

The food segment is just one of many industries IBM will target for its blockchain platform. It describes the platform as ideally suited to help address varied industry challenges because it establishes a trusted environment for all transactions. IBM claims it as the only fully integrated enterprise-ready blockchain platform designed to accelerate the development, governance and operation of a multi-institution business network. Rival vendors, like Accenture, may disagree.  In the case of the global food supply chain, all participants -growers, suppliers, processors, distributors, retailers, regulators and consumers – can gain permissioned access to known and trusted information regarding the origin and state of food. In December 2016 DancingDinosaur reported on IBM and Walmart using blockchain for food safety.

IBM’s blockchain platform is built around Hyperledger Composer, integrated with popular development environments using open developer tools, and accepted business terms to generate blockchain code and smart contracts. It also includes sample industry use cases.  Using IBM’s platform, developers can create standard business language in JavaScript and the APIs help keep development work at the business level, rather than being highly technical. This makes it possible for most any programmer to be a blockchain developer. Additionally, a variety of IBM Developer Journeys for blockchain are available featuring free open source code, documentation, APIs, architecture diagrams, and one-click deployment Git repositories to fast-track building, according to IBM.

For governance and operation it also provides activation tools for new networks, members, smart contracts and transaction channels. It also includes multi-party workflow tool with member activities panel, integrated notifications, and secure signature collection for policy voting. In addition, a new class of democratic governance tools designed to help improve productivity across the organizations uses a voting process that collects signatures from members to govern member invitation distribution of smart contracts and the creation of transactions channels. By enabling the quick onboarding of participants, assigning roles, and managing access, organizations can begin transacting via the blockchain fast.

In operating the network IBM blockchain platform provides always-on, high availability with seamless software and blockchain network updates, a hardened security stack with no privileged access, which blocks malware, and built-in blockchain monitoring for full network visibility. Woven throughout the platform is the Hyperledger Fabric. It also provides the highest-level, commercially available tamper resistant FIPS140-2 level 4 protection for encryption keys.

Along with its blockchain platform, IBM is advancing other blockchain supply chain initiatives by using the platform for an automated billing and invoicing system. Initial work to use blockchain for invoicing also is underway starting with Lenovo. This will provide an audit-ready solution with full traceability of billing and operational data, and help speed on-boarding time for new vendors and new contract requirements, according to IBM.

The platform leverages IBM’s work for more than 400 organizations. It includes insights gained as IBM has built blockchain networks across industries ranging from financial services, supply chain and logistics, retail, government, and healthcare.

Extensively tested and piloted, the IBM’s new blockchain platform addresses a wide range of enterprise pain points, including both business and technical requirements around security, performance, collaboration and privacy. It includes innovation developed through open source collaboration in the Hyperledger community, including the newest Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 framework and Hyperledger Composer blockchain tool, both hosted by the Linux Foundation.

DancingDinosaur has previously noted that the z appears ideal for blockchain. DancingDinosaur based this on the z13’s scalability, security, and performance. The new z14, with its automated, pervasive encryption may be even better.  The Hyperledger Composer capabilities along with the sample use cases promise an easy, simple way to try blockchain among some suppliers and partners.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Racks Up Blockchain Success

July 15, 2016

It hasn’t even been a year (Dec. 17, 2015) since IBM first publicly introduced its participation in the Linux Foundation’s newest collaborative project, Open Ledger Project, a broad-based Blockchain initiative.  And only this past April did IBM make serious noise publicly about Blockchain on the z, here. But since then IBM has been ramping up Blockchain initiatives fast.

LinuxONE rockhopper

Courtesy of IBM: LinuxONE Rockhopper

Just this week IBM made its security framework for blockchain public, first announced in April, by releasing the beta of IBM’s Blockchain Enterprise Test Network. This enables organizations to easily access a secure, partitioned blockchain network on the cloud to deploy, test, and run blockchain projects.

The IBM Blockchain Enterprise Test Network is a cloud platform built on a LinuxONE system.  Developers can now test four-node networks for transactions and validations with up to four parties.  The Network provides the next level of service for developers ready to go beyond the two-node blockchain service currently available in Bluemix for testing and simulating transactions between two parties. The Enterprise Test Network runs on LinuxONE, which IBM touts as the industry’s most secure Linux server due to the z mainframe’s Evaluation Assurance Level 5+ (EAL5+) security rating.

Also this week, Everledger, a fraud detection system for use with big data, announced it is building a business network using IBM Blockchain for their global certification system designed to track valuable items through the supply chain. Such items could be diamonds, fine art, and luxury goods.

Things continued to crank up around blockchain with IBM announcing a collaboration with the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) and the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS). With this arrangement IBM researchers will work with government, industries, and academia to develop applications and solutions based on enterprise blockchain, cyber-security, and cognitive computing technologies. The effort will draw on the expertise in the Singapore talent pool as well as that of the IBM Research network.  The Center also is expected to engage with small- and medium-sized enterprises to create new applications and grow new markets in finance and trade.

Facilitating this is the cloud. IBM expects new cloud services around blockchain will make these technologies more accessible and enable leaders from all industries to address what is already being recognized as profound and disruptive implications in finance, banking, IoT, healthcare, supply chains, manufacturing, technology, government, the legal system, and more. The hope, according to IBM, is that collaboration with the private sector and multiple government agencies within the same country will advance the use of Blockchain and cognitive technologies to improve business transactions across several different industries.

That exactly is the goal of blockchain. In a white paper from the IBM Institute of Business Value on blockchain, here, the role of blockchain is as a distributed, shared, secure ledger. These shared ledgers write business transactions as an unbreakable chain that forms a permanent record viewable by the parties in a transaction. In effect, blockchains shifts the focus from information held by an individual party to the transaction as a whole, a cross-entity history of an asset or transaction. This alone promises to reduce or even eliminate friction in the transaction while removing the need for most middlemen.

In that way, the researchers report, an enterprise, once constrained by complexity, can scale without unnecessary friction. It can integrate vertically or laterally across a network or ecosystem, or both. It can be small and transact with super efficiency. Or, it can be a coalition of individuals that come together briefly. Moreover, it can operate autonomously; as part of a self-governing, cognitive network. In effect, distributed ledgers can become the foundation of a secure distributed system of trust, a decentralized platform for massive collaboration. And through the Linux Foundation’s Open Ledger Project, blockchain remains open.

Even at this very early stage there is no shortage of takers ready to push the boundaries of this technology. For example, Crédit Mutuel Arkéa recently announced the completion of its first blockchain project to improve the bank’s ability to verify customer identity. The result is an operational permissioned blockchain network that provides a view of customer identity to enable compliance with Know Your Customer (KYC) requirements. The bank’s success demonstrated the disruptive capabilities of blockchain technology beyond common transaction-oriented use cases.

Similarly, Mizuho Financial Group and IBM announced in June a test of the potential of blockchain for use in settlements with virtual currency. Blockchain, by the way, first gained global attention with Bitcoin, an early virtual currency. By incorporating blockchain technology into settlements with virtual currency, Mizuho plans to explore how payments can be instantaneously swapped, potentially leading to new financial services based on this rapidly evolving technology. The pilot project uses the open source code IBM contributed to the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Project.

Cloud-based blockchain running on large LinuxONE clusters may turn out to play a big role in ensuring the success of IoT by monitoring and tracking the activity between millions of things participating in a wide range of activities. Don’t let your z data center get left out; at least make sure it can handle Linux at scale.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Puts Blockchain on the z System for a Disruptive Edge

April 22, 2016

Get ready for Blockchain to alter your z-based transaction environment. Blockchain brings a new class of distributed ledger applications. Bitcoin, the first Blockchain system to grab mainstream data center attention, is rudimentary compared to what the Linux Foundation’s open HyperledgerProject will deliver.

ibm-blockchain-adept1

As reported in CIO Magazine, Blockchain enables a distributed ledger technology with ability to settle transactions in seconds or minutes automatically via computers. This is a faster, potentially more secure settlement process than is used today among financial institutions, where clearing houses and other third-party intermediaries validate accounts and identities over a few days. Financial services, as well as other industries, are exploring blockchain for conducting transactions as diverse as trading stock, buying diamonds, and streaming music.

IBM in conjunction with the Linux Foundation’s HyperledgerProject expects the creation and management of Blockchain network services to power a new class of distributed ledger applications. With the HyperLedger and Blockchain developers could create digital assets and accompanying business logic to more securely and privately transfer assets among members of a permissioned Blockchain network running on IBM LinuxONE or Linux on z.

In addition, IBM will introduce fully integrated DevOps tools for creating, deploying, running and monitoring Blockchain applications on the IBM Cloud and enable applications to be deployed on IBM z Systems. Furthermore, by using Watson as part of an IoT platform IBM intends to make possible information from devices such as RFID-based locations, barcode-scan events, or device-recorded data to be used with IBM Blockchain apps. Clearly, IBM is looking at Blockchain for more than just electronic currency. In fact, Blockchain will enable a wide range of secure transactions between parties without the use of intermediaries, which should speed transaction flow. For starters, the company brought to the effort 44,000 lines of code as a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s HyperledgerProject

The z, with its rock solid reputation for no-fail, extreme high volume and performance, and secure processing, is a natural for Blockchain applications and system. In the process it brings the advanced cryptography, security, and reliability of the z platform. No longer content just to handle traditional backend systems-of-record processing IBM is pushing to bring the z into new areas that leverage the strength and flexibility of today’s mainframe.  As IoT ramps up expect the z to handle escalating volumes of IoT traffic, mobile traffic, and now blockchain distributed ledger traffic.  Says IBM: “We intend to support clients looking to deploy this disruptive technology at scale, with performance, availability and security.” That statement has z written all over it.

Further advancing the z into new areas, IBM reemphasized its advantages through built-in hardware accelerators for hashing and digital signatures, tamper-proof security cards, unlimited random keys to encode transactions, and integration to existing business data with Smart Contract APIs. IBM believes the z could take blockchain performance to new levels with the world’s fastest commercial processor, which is further optimized through the use of hundreds of internal processors. The highly scalable I/O system can handle massive amounts of transactions and the optimized network between virtual systems in a z Systems cloud can speed up blockchain peer communications.

An IBM Blockchain DevOps service will also enable blockchain applications to be deployed on the z, ensuring an additional level of security, availability and performance for handling sensitive and regulated data. Blockchain applications can access existing transactions on distributed servers and z through APIs to support new payment, settlement, supply chain, and business processes.

Use Blockchain on the z to create and manage Blockchain networks to power the emerging new classes of distributed ledger applications.  According to IBM, developers can create digital assets and the accompanying business logic to more securely and privately transfer assets among members of a permissioned Blockchain network. Using fully integrated DevOps tools for creating, deploying, running, and monitoring Blockchain applications on IBM Cloud, data centers can enable applications to be deployed on the z. Through the Watson IoT Platform, IBM will make it possible for information from devices such as RFID-based locations, barcode scans, or device-recorded data to be used with IBM Blockchain.

However, Blockchain remains nascent technology. Although the main use cases already are being developed and deployed many more ideas for blockchain systems and applications are only just being articulated. Nobody, not even the Linux Foundation, knows what ultimately will shake out. Blockchain enables developers to easily build secure distributed ledgers that can be used to exchange most anything of value fast and securely. Now is the time for data center managers at z shops to think what they might want to do with such extremely secure transactions on their z.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Systems Sets 2016 Priorities

December 14, 2015

Despite its corporate struggles, IBM Systems, the organization that replaced IBM System and Technology Group (IBM STG) had a pretty good year in 2015. It started the year by launching the z13, which was optimized for the cloud and mobile economy. No surprise there. IBM made no secret that cloud, mobile, and analytics were its big priorities.  Over the year it also added cognitive computing and software defined storage to its priorities.

But it might have left out its biggest achievement of 2015.  This week IBM announced receiving a major multi-year research grant to IBM scientists to advance the building blocks for a universal quantum computer. The award was made by the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) program. This may not come to commercial fruition in our working lives but it has the potential to radically change computing as we have ever envisioned it. And it certainly will put a different spin on worries about Moore’s Law.

Three Types of Quantum Computing

Right now, according to IBM, the workhorse of the quantum computer is the quantum bit (qubit). Many scientists are tackling the challenge of building qubits, but quantum information is extremely fragile and requires special techniques to preserve the quantum state. This fragility of qubits played a key part in one of the preposterous but exciting plots on the TV show Scorpion. The major hurdles include creating qubits of high quality and packaging them together in a scalable form so they can perform complex calculations in a controllable way – limiting the errors that can result from heat and electromagnetic radiation.

IBM scientists made a great stride in that direction earlier this year by demonstrating critical breakthroughs to detect quantum errors by combining superconducting qubits in lattices on computer chips – and whose quantum circuit design is the only physical architecture that can scale to larger dimensions.

To return to a more mundane subject, revenue, during 2015 DancingDinosaur reported the positive contributions the z System made to IBM’s revenue, one of the company’s few positive revenue performers. Turned out DancingDinosaur missed one contributor since it doesn’t track constant currency. If you look at constant currency, which smooths out fluctuations in currency valuations, IBM Power Systems have been on an upswing for the last 3 quarters: up 1% in Q1, up 5% in Q2, up 2% in Q3.   DancingDinosaur expects both z and Power to contribute to IBM revenue in upcoming quarters.

Looking ahead to 2016, IBM identified the following priorities:

  • Develop an API ecosystem that monetizes big data and cognitive workloads, built on the cloud as part of becoming a better service provider.
  • Win the architectural battle with OpenPOWER and POWER8 – designed for data and the cognitive era. (Unspoken, beat x86.)
  • Extend z Systems for new mobile, cloud and in-line analytics workloads.
  • Capture new developers, markets and buyers with open innovation on IBM LinuxONE, the most advanced and trusted enterprise Linux system.
  • Shift the IBM storage portfolio to a Flash and the software defined model that disrupts the industry by enabling new workloads, very high speed, and data virtualization for improved data economics.
  • Engage clients through a digital-first Go-to-Market model

These are all well and good. About the only thing missing is any mention of the IBM Open Mainframe Project that was announced in August as a partnership with the Linux Foundation. Still hoping that will generate the kind of results in terms of innovative products for the z that the OpenPOWER initiative has started to produce. DancingDinosaur covered that announcement here. Hope they haven’t given up already.  Just have to remind myself to be patient; it took about a year to start getting tangible results from OpenPOWER consortium.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Expect this to be the final DancingDinosaur for 2015.  Be back the week of Jan. 4

IBM z System Shines in 3Q15 Quarterly Report

October 23, 2015

IBM posted another down quarter this past Monday, maybe the thirteenth in a row; it’s easy to lose track. But yet again, the IBM z System provided a bright spot, a 15 percent increase compared with the year-ago period. Last quarter the z also came up a winner. Still the investment analysts went crazy, the stock tumbled, and wild scenarios, inspired by Dell’s acquisition of EMC no doubt, began circulating.

ibm-z13

IBM z13

However, don’t expect IBM to be going away anytime soon. DancingDinosaur is a technology analyst and writer, absolutely not a financial analyst (his wife handles the checkbook).  If you look at what has been going on in the past two years with z System and POWER from a technology standpoint these platforms are here for the long haul.  Most of the top 100 companies rely on a mainframe.  Linux on z has become a factor in roughly 70 percent of the leading shops. When DancingDinosaur last ran the numbers there still are about 5000-6000 active mainframe shops and the numbers aren’t dropping nearly as fast as some pundits would have you believe.

primary-linuxone-emperor

IBM LinuxONE

The z13 and LinuxONE are very powerful mainframes, the most powerful by any number of measures in the industry.  And they are a dramatically different breed of enterprise platform, capable of concurrently running mixed workloads—OLTP, mobile, cloud, analytics—with top performance, scalability, and rock solid security. The Open Mainframe Project in conjunction with the Linux Foundation means that IBM no longer is going it alone with the mainframe. A similar joint effort with the Open POWER Consortium began delivering results within a year.

The Dell-EMC comparison is not a valid one. EMC’s primary business was storage and the business at the enterprise level has changed dramatically. It has changed for IBM too; the company’s revenues from System Storage decreased 19 percent. But storage was never as important to the company as the z, which had long been its cash cow, now diminished for sure but still worth the investment. The dozens and dozens of acquisitions EMC made never brought it much in terms of synergy. IBM, at least, has its strategic imperatives plan that is making measurable progress.

IBM’s strategic imperatives, in fact, were the only business that was doing as well as the z. Strategic imperatives revenue: up 27 percent year-to-year; Cloud revenue up more than 65 percent year-to-date.  Total cloud revenue hit $9.4 billion over the trailing 12 months. Cloud delivered as a service had an annual run rate of $4.5 billion vs. $3.1 billion in third-quarter 2014.  Business analytics revenue was up 19 percent year-to-date. Be interesting to see what cognitive computing and Watson can produce.

Besides storage, the other dim spot in the IBM platform story is Power Systems.  Revenues from Power Systems were down 3 percent compared with the 2014 period. DancingDinosaur, long a fan of Power Systems, anticipates the platform will turn positive next quarter or the first quarter of 2016 as some of the new technology and products coming, in part, from the Open POWER Consortium begin to attract new customers and ring up sales. The new Power Systems LC Server family should attract interest for hybrid Cloud, Hyperscale Data Centers, and Open Solutions, hopefully bringing new customers. With online pricing starting around $6600 the LC machines should be quite competitive against x86 boxes of comparable capabilities.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM LinuxONE and Open Mainframe Project Expand the z System

August 20, 2015

Meet the new IBM z System; called LinuxONE Emperor (named after the Emperor Penguin.) It is a z13 running only Linux. Check out the full announcement here.

Primary LinuxOne emperor

Courtesy of IBM, LinuxONE Emperor, the newest z System

DancingDinosaur is excited by several aspects of this announcement:  IBM is establishing, in conjunction with the Linux Foundation, an Open Mainframe Project; the company is breaking with its traditional mainframe pricing model; it also is putting KVM and Ubuntu on the machine; and it is offering a smorgasbord of app-dev options, including some of the sexiest in the industry today. DancingDinosaur never believed it would refer to a mainframe as sexy (must be time to retire).

Along with LinuxONE Emperor IBM announced an entry dedicated Linux machine, the LinuxONE Rockhopper. (BTW; notice the new playfulness in IBM’s product naming.) Rockhopper appears to be very similar to what IBM used to call a Business Class z, although IBM has stepped away from that designation. The closest you may get to a z13 business class machine may be LinuxONE Rockhopper. Rockhopper, according to IBM, is designed for clients and emerging markets seeking the speed, security and availability of the mainframe but in a smaller package.

The biggest long term potential impact from the announcement may come out of the Open Mainframe Project. Like many of IBM’s community project initiatives, IBM is starting by seeding the open community with z code, in effect creating the beginning of an open z System machine.  IBM describes this as the largest single contribution of mainframe code from IBM to the open source community. A key part of the mainframe code contributions will be the z’s IT predictive analytics that constantly monitor for unusual system behavior and help prevent issues from turning into failures. In effect, IBM is handing over zAware to the open source community. It had already announced intentions to port zAware to Linux on z early this year so it might as well make it fully open. The code, notes IBM, can be used by developers to build similar sense-and-respond resiliency capabilities for other systems.

The Open Mainframe Project, being formed with the Linux Foundation, will involve a collaboration of nearly a dozen organizations across academia, government, and corporate sectors to advance development and adoption of Linux on the mainframe. It appears that most of the big mainframe ISVs have already signed on. DancingDinosaur, however, expressed concern that this approach brings the possibility of branching the underlying functionality between z and Linux versions. IBM insists that won’t happen since the innovations would be implemented at the software level, safely insulated from the hardware. And furthermore, should there emerge an innovation that makes sense for the z System, maybe some innovation around the zAware capabilities, the company is prepared to bring it back to the core z.

The newly announced pricing should also present an interesting opportunity for shops running Linux on z.  As IBM notes: new financing models for the LinuxONE portfolio provide flexibility in pricing and resources that allow enterprises to pay for what they use and scale up quickly when their business grows. Specifically, for IBM hardware and software, the company is offering a pay-per-use option in the form of a fixed monthly payment with costs scaling up or down based on usage. It also offers per-core pricing with software licenses for designated cores. In that case you can order what you need and decrease licenses or cancel on 30 days notice. Or, you can rent a LinuxONE machine monthly with no upfront payment.  At the end of the 36-month rental (can return the hardware after 1 year) you choose to return, buy, or replace. Having spent hours attending mainframe pricing sessions at numerous IBM conferences this seems refreshingly straightforward. IBM has not yet provided any prices to analysts so whether this actually is a bargain remains to be seen. But at least you have pricing option flexibility you never had before.

The introduction of support for both KVM and Ubuntu on the z platform opens intriguing possibilities.  Full disclosure: DancingDinosaur was an early Fedora adopter because he could get it to run on a memory-challenged antiquated laptop. With the LinuxONE announcement Ubuntu has been elevated to a fully z-supported Linux distribution. Together IBM and Canonical are bringing a distribution of Linux incorporating Ubuntu’s scale-out and cloud expertise on the IBM z Systems platform, further expanding the reach of both. Ubuntu combined with KVM should make either LinuxONE machine very attractive for OpenStack-based hybrid cloud computing that may involve thousands of VMs. Depending on how IBM ultimately prices things, this could turn into an unexpected bargain for Linux on z data centers that want to save money by consolidating x86 Linux servers, thereby reducing the data center footprint and cutting energy costs.  LinuxONE Emperor can handle 8000 virtual servers in a single system, tens of thousands of containers.

Finally, LinuxONE can run the sexiest app-dev tools using any of the hottest open technologies, specifically:

  • Distributions: Red Hat, SuSE and Ubuntu
  • Hypervisors: PR/SM, z/VM, and KVM
  • Languages: Python, Perl, Ruby, Rails, Erlang, Java, Node.js
  • Management: WAVE, IBM Cloud Manager, Urban Code Openstack, Docker, Chef, Puppet, VMware vRealize Automation
  • Database: Oracle, DB2LUW, MariaDB, MongoDB, PostgreSQL
  • Analytics: Hadoop, Big Insights, DB2BLU and Spark

And run the results however you want: single platform, multi-platform, on-prem and off-prem, or multiple mixed cloud environments with a common toolset. Could a combination of LinuxONE alongside a conventional z13 be the mainframe data center you really want going forward?

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Ranked #1 in Midrange Servers and Enterprise Network Storage

August 13, 2015

Although the financial markets may be beating up IBM the technology world continues to acclaim IBM technology and products. Most recently, IBM ranked on top in the CRN Annual Report Card (ARC) Survey recognizing the best-in-class vendors in the categories of partnership, support, and product innovation.  But the accolades don’t stop there.

Mobile Security Infographic

Courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

IBM was named a leader in four key cloud services categories—hosting, overall cloud professional services, cloud consulting services, and systems integration—by the independent technology market research firm Technology Business Research, Inc. (TBR).  This summer Gartner also named IBM as a leader in Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) in the latest Gartner Magic Quadrant for SIEM, this for the seventh consecutive year. Gartner also named IBM as a Leader in the 2015 Magic Quadrant for Mobile Application Development Platforms, specifically calling out the IBM MobileFirst Platform.

The CRN award addresses the technology channel. According to IBM, the company and its business partners are engaging with clients in new ways to work, building the infrastructure, and deploying innovative solutions for the digital era.  This should come as no surprise to anyone reading this blog; the z 13 was designed expressly to be a digital platform for the cloud, mobile, and big data era.  IBM’s z and Power Systems servers and Storage Solutions specifically were designed to address the challenges these areas present.

Along the same lines, IBM’s commitment to open alliances has continued this year unabated, starting with its focus on innovation platforms designed for big data and superior cloud economics, which continue to be the cornerstone of IBM Power System. The company also plays a leading role in the Open Power Foundation, the Linux Foundation as well as ramping up communities around the Internet of Things, developerWorks Recipes, and the open cloud, developerWorks Open. The last two were topics DancingDinosaur tackled recently, here and here.

The TBR report, entitled Hosted Private & Professional Services Cloud Benchmark, provides a market synopsis and growth estimates for 29 cloud providers in the first quarter of 2015. In that report, TBR cited IBM as:

  • The undisputed growth leader in overall professional cloud services
  • The leader in hosted private cloud and managed cloud services
  • A leader in OpenStack vendor acquisitions and OpenStack cloud initiatives
  • A growth leader in cloud consulting services, bridging the gap between technology and strategy consulting
  • A growth leader in cloud systems integration services

According to the report: IBM’s leading position across all categories remains unchallenged as the company’s established SoftLayer and Bluemix portfolios, coupled with in-house cloud and solutions integration expertise, provide enterprises with end-to-end solutions.

Wall Street analysts and pundits clearly look at IBM differently than IT analysts.  The folks who look at IBM’s technology, strategy, and services, like those at Gartner, TBR, and the CRN report card, tell a different story. Who do you think has it right?

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Expanding Mainframe Linux and Cloud Computing

June 9, 2014

In case you wondered if IBM is seriously committed to both mainframe Linux and cloud computing on the System z platform you need only look at the June 2 announcement that the company is opening the first dedicated System z Linux and cloud computing competency center in Beijing.  According to the announcement, the new center is specifically intended to help organizations there take advantage of Linux and cloud computing solutions on the mainframe, and help accelerate adoption of Linux on System z in China.

This is just the most recent of a number of developments that boosted the System z profile. Even at the recent IBM Edge 2014 conference, which was not about the System z at all (a System z and Power conference, Enterprise 2014, is coming up in October) still managed to slip in some System z sessions and content, including one about protecting DB2 data on z/OS using tape and other sessions that included the System z and Power enterprise servers in discussions on various aspects of cloud computing or the use of flash.

Following the Mainframe50 announcement earlier in the spring, IBM introduced more System z enhancements including the IBM Enterprise Cloud System, an OpenStack-based converged offering that includes compute, storage, software, and services and built around the zBC12; IBM Wave for z/VM, which simplifies z/VM virtualization management and expedites an organization’s path to the cloud; and a new IBM Cloud Management Suite for System z, which handles dynamic provisioning and performance monitoring.

An interesting aspect of this announcement is the IBM’s focus on Linux. It has taken a decade for Linux to gain traction in System z data centers but patience is finally paying off.  Linux has proven instrumental in bringing new mainframe users to the platform (DancingDinosuar previously reported on Algar, a Brazilian telco) ; according to IBM, more than 50% of all new mainframe accounts since 2010 run Linux. To that end, DancingDinosaur has long recommended the Enterprise Linux Server Solution Edition program, a deeply discounted package hardware, middleware, and software. It represents the best and maybe the only bargain IBM regularly offers.

Linux itself has proven remarkably robust and has achieved widespread acceptance among enterprises running a variety of platforms. According to the IDC, Linux server demand is rising due to demand from cloud infrastructure deployments. The researcher expects that demand to continue into the future. In the first quarter of 2014, Linux server revenue accounted for 30 percent of overall server revenue, an increase of 15.4 percent.

Along with cloud computing, collaborative development appears to be contributing to the continued growth and adoption of Linux. According to the Linux Foundation, a new business model has emerged in which companies are joining together across industries to share development resources and build common open source code bases on which they can differentiate their own products and services. This collaborative approach promises to transform a number of industries, especially those involved with cloud computing, social and mobile. Apparently it provides a fast way to create the next generation of technology products.

In its latest survey, the Linux Foundation identified three drivers or the recent Linux growth:

  1. Collaborative software development—ninety-one percent of business managers and executives surveyed ruled collaborative software development somewhat to very important to their business while nearly 80 percent say collaborative development practices have been seen as more strategic to their organization over the past three years.
  2. Growing investments in collaborative software development—44 percent of business managers said they would increase their investments in collaborative software development in the next six months
  3. The benefits of collaboration—more than 77 percent of managers said collaborative development practices have benefited their organizations through a shorter product development cycle/faster time to market.

The bulk of the world’s critical transaction processing and production data continue to reside on the mainframe, around 70 percent, according to IBM. Similarly, 71% of all Fortune 500 companies have their core businesses on a mainframe. And this has remained remarkably steady over the past decade despite the rise of cloud computing. Of course, all these organizations have extensive multi-platform data centers and are adding growing numbers of on-premise and increasingly hybrid cloud systems.

Far from relying on its core production processing to carry the mainframe forever, the new Beijing mainframe Linux-cloud center demonstrates IBM’s intent to advance the mainframe platform in new markets. It is opening the mainframe up in a variety of ways; from z/OS in the cloud to Hadoop for z to new cloud-like pay-for-use pricing models. Watch DancingDinosaur for an upcoming post on the new pricing discounts for mobile transactions on z/OS.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding and can be followed on Twitter, @mainframeblog

Open KVM Adds Kimchi to Speed Ramp Up

November 15, 2013

The Linux Foundation, the group trying to drive the growth of Linux and collaborative development recently brought the Open Virtualization Alliance (OVA) under its umbrella as a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.  The change should help KVM take better advantage of the marketing and administrative capabilities of the Linux Foundation and enable tighter affinity with the Linux community at large.

The immediate upshot of the Oct. 21 announcement was increased exposure for open KVM.  Over 150 media stories appeared, Facebook hits jumped 33%, and the OVA website saw a big surge of traffic, 82% of which from first time visitors. First up on the agenda should be tapping the expansive ecosystem of the Linux Foundation in service of Kimchi, OVA’s new easy to deploy and use administrative tool for KVM.  Mike Day, an IBM Distinguished Engineer and Chief Virtualization Architect for Open Systems Development described Kimchi as the “fastest on-ramp to using KVM.

Kimchi is about as lightweight as a management tool can get. It offers stateless installation (no server), brings a graphical and mobile interface, and comes bundled with KVM for Power but does not require HMC, IBM’s primary tool for planning, deploying, and managing IBM Power System servers. It also is based on open, standard components, including the RESTful API, and it is part of the OpenStack community.

What Kimchi does is to provide a mobile- and Windows-friendly virtualization manager for KVM. It delivers point-to-point management, thereby avoiding the need to invest in yet more management server hardware, training, or installation. Promised to be simple to use, it was designed to appeal to a VMware administrator.

So what can you actually do with Kimchi? At the moment only the basics.  You can use it to manage all KVM guests, although it does has special support for some Linux guests at this point. Also, you can use it without Linux skills.

To figure out the path going forward the OVA and Linux Foundation are really seeking community participation and feedback.  Some of the Kimchi options coming under consideration first:

  • Federation versus export to OpenStack
  • Further storage and networking configurations; how advanced does it need to get?
  • Automation and tuning – how far should it go?
  • RESTful API development and usage
  • Addition of knobs and dials or keep sparse

Today Kimchi supports most basic networking and configurations.  There is yet no VLAN or clustering with Kimchi.

Kimchi is poised to fulfill a central position in the KVM environment—able to speed adoption.  What is most needed, however, is an active ecosystem of developers who can build out this sparse but elegant open source tool. To do that, IBM will need to give some attention to Kimchi to make sure it doesn’t get overlooked or lost in the slew of its sister open source initiatives like OpenStack, Linux itself, and even Eclipse. OpenStack, it appears, will be most critical, and it is a good sign that it already is at the top of the Kimchi to-do list.

And speaking of IBM opening up development, in an announcement earlier this week IBM said it will make its IBM Watson technology available as a development platform in the cloud to enable a worldwide community of software application providers who might build a new generation of apps infused with Watson’s cognitive computing intelligence.  Watson badly needed this; until now Watson has been an impressive toy for a very small club.

The move, according to IBM, aims to spur innovation and fuel a new ecosystem of entrepreneurial software application providers – ranging from start-ups and emerging, venture capital backed businesses to established players. To make this work IBM will be launching the IBM Watson Developers Cloud, a cloud-hosted marketplace where application providers of all sizes and industries will be able to tap into resources for developing Watson-powered apps. This will include a developer toolkit, educational materials, and access to Watson’s application programming interface (API). And they should do the same with Kimchi.


%d bloggers like this: