Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

IBM Launches New IoT Collaborative Initiative

February 23, 2017

Collaboration partners can pull hundreds of millions of dollars in new revenue from IoT, according to IBM’s recent IoT announcement. Having reached what it describes as a tipping point with IoT innovation the company now boasts of having over 6,000 clients and partners around the world, many of whom are now wanting to join in its new global Watson IoT center to co-innovate. Already Avnet, BNP Paribas, Capgemini, and Tech Mahindra will collocate development teams at the IBM Munich center to work on IoT collaborations.

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IBM Opens New Global Center for Watson IoT

The IBM center also will act as an innovation space for the European IoT standards organization EEBus.  The plan, according to Harriet Green, General Manager, IBM Watson IoT, Cognitive Engagement and Education (pictured above left), calls for building a new global IoT innovation ecosystem that will explore how cognitive and IoT technologies will transform industries and our daily lives.

IoT and more recently cognitive are naturals for the z System, and POWER Systems have been the platform for natural language processing and cognitive since Watson won Jeopardy three years ago. With the latest enhancements IBM has brought to the z in the form of on-premises cognitive and machine learning the z should assume an important role as it gathers, stores, collects, and processes IoT data for cognitive analysis. DancingDinosaur first reported on this late in 2014 and again just last week. As IoT and cognitive workloads ramp up on z don’t be surprised to see monthly workload charges rise.

Late last year IBM announced that car maker BMW will collocate part of its research and development operations at IBM’s new Watson IoT center to help reimagine the driving experience. Now, IBM is announcing four more companies that have signed up to join its special industry “collaboratories” where clients and partners work together with 1,000 Munich-based IBM IoT experts to tap into the latest design thinking and push the boundaries of the possible with IoT.

Let’s look at the four newest participants starting with Avnet. According to IBM, an IT distributor and global IBM partner, Avnet will open a new joint IoT Lab within IBM’s Watson IoT HQ to develop, build, demonstrate and sell IoT solutions powered by IBM Watson. Working closely with IBM’s leading technologists and IoT experts, Avnet also plans to enhance its IoT technical expertise through hands-on training and on-the-job learning. Avnet’s team of IoT and analytics experts will also partner with IBM on joint business development opportunities across multiple industries including smart buildings, smart homes, industry, transportation, medical, and consumer.

As reported by BNP Paribas, Consorsbank, its retail digital bank in Germany, will partner with IBM´s new Watson IoT Center. The company will collocate a team of solution architects, developers and business development personnel at the Watson facility. Together with IBM’s experts, they will explore how IoT and cognitive technologies can drive transformation in the banking industry and help innovate new financial products and services, such as investment advice.

Similarly, global IT consulting and technology services provider Capgemini will collocate a team of cognitive IoT experts at the Watson center. Together they will help customers maximize the potential of Industry 4.0 and develop and take to market sector-specific cognitive IoT solutions. Capgemini plans a close link between its Munich Applied Innovation Exchange and IBM’s new Customer Experience zones to collaborate with clients in an interactive environment.

Finally, the Indian multinational provider of enterprise and communications IT and networking technology Tech Mahindra, is one of IBM’s Global System Integrators with over 3,000 specialists focused on IBM technology around the world. The company will locate a team of six developers and engineers within the Watson IoT HQ to help deliver on Tech Mahindra’s vision of generating substantial new revenue based on IBM’s Watson IoT platform. Tech Mahindra will use the center to co-create and showcase new solutions based on IBM’s Watson IoT platform for Industry 4.0 and Manufacturing, Precision Farming, Healthcare, Insurance and Banking, and automotive.

To facilitate connecting the z to IoT IBM offers a simple recipe. It requires 4 basic ingredients and 4 steps: Texas Instrument’s SensorTag, a Bluemix account, IBM z/OS Connect Enterprise Edition, and a back-end service like CICS.  Start by exposing an existing z Systems application as a RESTful AP. This is where the z/OS Connect Edition comes in.  Then enable your SensorTag device to Watson IoT Quick Start. From there connect the Cloud to your on-premises Hybrid Cloud.  Finally, enable the published IoT data to trigger a RESTful API. Sounds pretty straightforward but—full disclosure—Dancing Dinosaur has not tried it due to lacking the necessary pieces. If you try it, please tell DancingDinosaur how it works (info@radding.net). Good luck.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM On-Premises Cognitive Means z Systems Only

February 16, 2017

Just in case you missed the incessant drumbeat coming out of IBM, the company committed to cognitive computing. But that works for z data centers since IBM’s cognitive system is available on-premises only for the z. Another z first: IBM just introduced Machine Learning (key for cognitive) for the private cloud starting with the z.

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There are three ways to get IBM cognitive computing solutions: the IBM Cloud, Watson, or the z System, notes Donna Dillenberger, IBM Fellow, IBM Enterprise Solutions. The z, however, is the only platform that IBM supports for cognitive computing on premises (sorry, no Power). As such, the z represents the apex of programmatic computing, at least as IBM sees it. It also is the only IBM platform that supports cognitive natively; mainly in the form of Hadoop and Spark, both of which are programmatic tools.

What if your z told you that a given strategy had a 92% of success. It couldn’t do that until now with IBM’s recently released cognitive system for z.

Your z system today represents the peak of programmatic computing. That’s what everyone working in computers grew up with, going all the way back to Assembler, COBOL, and FORTRAN. Newer languages and operating systems have arrived since; today your mainframe can respond to Java or Linux and now Python and Anaconda. Still, all are based on the programmatic computing model.

IBM believes the future lies in cognitive computing. Cognitive has become the company’s latest strategic imperative, apparently trumping its previous strategic imperatives: cloud, analytics, big data, and mobile. Maybe only security, which quietly slipped in as a strategic imperative sometime 2016, can rival cognitive, at least for now.

Similarly, IBM describes itself as a cognitive solutions and cloud platform company. IBM’s infatuation with cognitive starts with data. Only cognitive computing will enable organizations to understand the flood of myriad data pouring in—consisting of structured, local data but going beyond to unlock the world of global unstructured data; and then to decision tree-driven, deterministic applications, and eventually, probabilistic systems that co-evolve with their users by learning along with them.

You need cognitive computing. It is the only way, as IBM puts it: to move beyond the constraints of programmatic computing. In the process, cognitive can take you past keyword-based search that provides a list of locations where an answer might be located to an intuitive, conversational means to discover a set of confidence-ranked possibilities.

Dillenberger suggests it won’t be difficult to get to the IBM cognitive system on z . You don’t even program a cognitive system. At most, you train it, and even then the cognitive system will do the heavy lifting by finding the most appropriate training models. If you don’t have preexisting training models, “just use what the cognitive system thinks is best,” she adds. Then the cognitive system will see what happens and learn from it, tweaking the models as necessary based on the results and new data it encounters. This also is where machine learning comes in.

IBM has yet to document payback and ROI data. Dillenberger, however, has spoken with early adopters.  The big promised payback, of course, will come from the new insights uncovered and the payback will be as astronomical or meager as you are in executing on those insights.

But there also is the promise of a quick technical payback for z data centers managers. When the data resides on z—a huge advantage for the z—you just run analytics where the data is. In such cases you can realize up to 3x the performance, Dillenberger noted.  Even if you have to pull data from some other location too you still run faster, maybe 2x faster. Other z advantages include large amounts of memory, multiple levels of cache, and multiple I/O processors get at data without impacting CPU performance.

When the data and IBM’s cognitive system resides on the z you can save significant money. “ETL consumed huge amounts of MIPS. But when the client did it all on the z, it completely avoided the costly ETL process,” Dillenberger noted. As a result, that client reported savings of $7-8 million dollars a year by completely bypassing the x-86 layer and ETL and running Spark natively on the z.

As Dillenberger describes it, cognitive computing on the z is here now, able to deliver a payback fast, and an even bigger payback going forward as you execute on the insights it reveals. And you already have a z, the only on-premises way to IBM’s Cognitive System.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Arcati 2017 Mainframe Survey—Cognitive a No-Show

February 2, 2017

DancingDinosaur checks into Arcati’s annual mainframe survey every few years. You can access a copy of the 2017 report here.  Some of the data doesn’t change much, a few percentage points here or there. For example, 75% of the respondents consider the mainframe too expensive. OK, people have been saying that for years.

On the other hand, 65% of the respondents’ mainframes are involved with web services. Half also run Java-based mainframe apps, up from 30% last year, while 17% more are planning to run Java with their mainframe this year. Similarly, 35% of respondents report running Linux on the mainframe, up from 22% last year. Again, 13% of the respondents expect to add Linux this year.  Driving this is the advantageous cost and management benefits that result from consolidating distributed Linux workloads on the z. Yes, things are changing.

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The biggest surprise for DancingDinosaur, however, revolved around IBM’s latest strategic initiatives, especially cognitive computing and blockchain.  Other strategic initiatives may include, depending on who is briefing you at the moment—security, data analytics, cloud, hybrid cloud, and mobile. These strategic imperatives, especially cognitive computing, are expected to drive IBM’s revenue. In the latest statement, reported last week in DancingDinosaur, strategic imperatives amounted to 41% of revenue.  Cloud revenue and Cloud-as-a-service also rose considerably, 35% and 61% respectively.

When DancingDinosaur searched the accompanying Arcati vendor report (over 120 vendors with brief descriptions) for cognitive only GT Software came up. IBM didn’t even mention cognitive in its vendor listing, which admittedly was skimpy. The case was the same with Blockchain; only one vendor, Atos, mentioned it and nothing about blockchain in the IBM listing. More vendors, however, noted supporting one or some of the other supposed strategic initiatives.

Overall, the Arcati survey is quite positive about the mainframe. The survey found that 50 percent of sites viewed their mainframe as a legacy system (down from last year’s 62 percent). However, 22 percent (up from 16 percent last year) viewed mainframe as strategic, with 28 percent (up from 22 percent) viewing mainframes as both strategic and legacy.

Reinforcing the value of the mainframe, the survey found 78 percent of sites experienced some kind of increase in capacity. With increased demand for mainframe resources (data and processing), it should not be surprising that respondents report an 81 percent an increase in technology costs. Yet, 38 percent of sites report their people costs have decreased or stayed the same.

Unfortunately, the survey also found that 70 percent of respondents thought there were a cultural barrier between mainframe and other IT professionals. That did not discourage respondents from pointing out the mainframe advantages: 100 percent highlighted the benefit of the mainframe’s availability, 83 percent highlighted security, 75 percent identified scalability, and 71 percent picked manageability as a mainframe benefit.

Also, social media runs on the mainframe. Respondents found social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) useful for their work on the mainframe. Twenty-seven percent report using social (up slightly from 25 percent last year) with the rest not using it at all despite IBM offering Facebook pages dedicated to IMS, CICS, and DB2. DancingDinosaur, only an occasional FB visitor, will check it out and report.

In terms of how mainframes are being used, the Arcati survey found that 25 percent of sites are planning to use Big Data; five percent of sites have adopted it for DevOps while 48 percent are planning to use mainframe DevOps going forward. Similarly, 14 percent of respondents already are reusing APIs while another 41 percent are planning to.

Arcati points out another interesting thought: The survey showed a 55:45 percent split in favor of distributed systems. So, you might expect the spend on the two types of platform to be similar. Yet, the survey found that 87 percent of an organization’s IT spend was going to distributed systems! Apparently mainframes aren’t as expensive as people think. Or put it another way, the cost of owning and operating distributed systems with mainframe-caliber QoS amounts to a lot more than people are admitting.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Cheers Beating Estimates But Losing Streak Continues

January 26, 2017

It has been 19 quarters since IBM reported positive revenue in its quarterly reports but the noises coming out of IBM with the latest 4Q16 and full year 2016 financials are upbeat due to the company beating analyst consensus revenue estimates and its strategic initiatives are starting to generate serious revenue.   Although systems revenues were down again (12%) the accountants at least had something positive to say about the z: “gross profit margins improved driven by z Systems performance.”

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EZSource: Dashboard visualizes changes to mainframe code

IBM doesn’t detail which z models were contributing but you can guess they would be the LinuxONE models (Emperor and Rock Hopper) and the z13. DancingDinosaur expects z performance to improve significantly in 2017 when a new z, which had been heavily hinted in the 3Q2016 results reported here, is expected to ship.

With it latest financials IBM is outright crowing about its strategic initiatives: Fourth-quarter cloud revenues increased 33 percent.  The annual exit run rate for cloud as-a-service revenue increased to $8.6 billion from $5.3 billion at year-end 2015.  Revenues from analytics increased 9 percent.  Revenues from mobile increased 16 percent and revenues from security increased 7 percent.

For the full year, revenues from strategic imperatives increased 13 percent.  Cloud revenues increased 35 percent to $13.7 billion.  The annual exit run rate for cloud as-a-service revenue increased 61 percent year to year.  Revenues from analytics increased 9 percent.  Revenues from mobile increased 34 percent and from security increased 13 percent.

Of course, cognitive computing is IBM’s strategic imperative darling for the moment, followed by blockchain. Cognitive, for which IBM appears to use an expansive definition, is primarily a cloud play as far as IBM is concerned.  There is, however, a specific role for the z, which DancingDinosaur will get into in a later post. Blockchain, on the other hand, should be a natural z play.  It is, essentially, extremely secure OLTP on steroids.  As blockchain scales up it is a natural to drive z workloads.

As far as IBM’s financials go the strategic imperatives indeed are doing well. Other business units, however, continue to struggle.  For instance:

  • Global Business Services (includes consulting, global process services and application management) — revenues of $4.1 billion, down 4.1 percent.
  • Systems (includes systems hardware and operating systems software), remember, this is where z and Power platforms reside — revenues of $2.5 billion, down 12.5 percent. But as noted above, gross profit margins improved, driven by z Systems performance.
  • Global Financing (includes financing and used equipment sales) — revenues of $447 million, down 1.5 percent.

A couple of decades ago, when this blogger first started covering IBM and the mainframe as a freelancer writing for any technology publication that would pay real money IBM was struggling (if $100 billion behemoths can be thought to be struggling). The buzz among the financial analysts who followed the company was that IBM should be broken up into its parts and sold off.  IBM didn’t take that advice, at least not exactly, but it did begin a rebound that included laying off tons of people and the sale of some assets. Since then it invested heavily in things like Linux on z and open systems.

In December IBM SVP Tom Rosamilia talked about new investments in z/OS and z software like DB2 and CICS and IMS, and the best your blogger can tell he is still there. (Rumors suggest Rosamilia is angling for Rometty’s job in two years.)  If the new z does actually arrive in 2017 and key z software is refreshed then z shops can rest easy, at least for another few quarters.  But whatever happens, you can follow it here.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

z System-Power-Storage Still Live at IBM

January 5, 2017

A mid-December briefing by Tom Rosamilia, SVP, IBM Systems, reassured some that IBM wasn’t putting its systems and platforms on the backburner after racking up financial quarterly losses for years. Expect new IBM systems in 2017. A few days later IBM announced that Japan-based APLUS Co., Ltd., which operates credit card and settlement service businesses, selected IBM LinuxONE as its mission-critical system for credit card payment processing. Hooray!

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LinuxONE’s security and industry-leading performance will ensure APLUS achieves its operational objectives as online commerce heats up and companies rely on cloud applications to draw and retain customers. Especially in Japan, where online and mobile shopping has become increasingly popular, the use of credit cards has grown, with more than 66 percent of consumers choosing that method for conducting online transactions. And with 80 percent enterprise hybrid cloud adoption predicted by 2017, APLUS is well positioned to connect cloud transactions leveraging LinuxONE. Throw in IBM’s expansion of blockchain capabilities and the APLUS move looks even smarter.

With the growth of international visitors spending money, IBM notes, and the emergence of FinTech firms in Japan have led to a diversification of payment methods the local financial industry struggles to respond. APLUS, which issues well-known credit cards such as T Card Plus, plans to offer leading-edge financial services by merging groups to achieve lean operations and improved productivity and efficiency. Choosing to update its credit card payment system with LinuxONE infrastructure, APLUS will benefit from an advanced IT environment to support its business growth by helping provide near-constant uptime. In addition to updating its server architecture, APLUS has deployed IBM storage to manage mission-critical data, the IBM DS8880 mainframe-attached storage that delivers integration with IBM z Systems and LinuxONE environments.

LinuxONE, however, was one part of the IBM Systems story Rosamilia set out to tell.  There also is the z13s, for encrypted hybrid clouds and the z/OS platform for Apache Spark data analytics and even more secure cloud services via blockchain on LinuxONE, by way of Bluemix or on premises.

z/OS will get attention in 2017 too. “z/OS is the best damn OLTP system in the world,” declared Rosamilia. He went on to imply that enhancements and upgrades to key z systems were coming in 2017, especially CICS, IMS, and a new release of DB2. Watch for new announcements coming soon as IBM tries to push z platform performance and capacity for z/OS and OLTP.

Rosamilia also talked up the POWER story. Specifically, Google and Rackspace have been developing OpenPOWER systems for the Open Compute Project.  New POWER LC servers running POWER8 and the NVIDIA NVLink accelerator, more innovations through the OpenCAPI Consortium, and the team of IBM and Nvidia to deliver PowerAI, part of IBM’s cognitive efforts.

As much as Rosamilia may have wanted to talk about platforms and systems IBM continues to avoid using terms like systems and platforms. So Rosamilia’s real intent was to discuss z and Power in conjunction with IBM’s strategic initiatives.  Remember these: cloud, big data, mobile, analytics. Lately, it seems, those initiatives have been culled down to cloud, hybrid cloud, and cognitive systems.

IBM’s current message is that IT innovation no longer comes from just the processor. Instead, it comes through scaling performance by workload and sustaining leadership through ecosystem partnerships.  We’ve already seen some of the fruits of that innovation through the Power community. Would be nice to see some of that coming to the z too, maybe through the open mainframe project. But that isn’t about z/0S. Any boost in CICS, DB2, and IMS will have to come from the core z team. The open mainframe project is about Linux on z.

The first glimpse we had of this came last spring in a system dubbed Minsky, which was described back then by commentator Timothy Prickett Morgan. With the Minsky machine, IBM is using NVLink ports on the updated Power8 CPU, which was shown in April at the OpenPower Summit and is making its debut in systems actually manufactured by ODM Wistron and rebadged, sold, and supported by IBM. The NVLink ports are bundled up in a quad to deliver 80 GB/sec bandwidth between a pair of GPUs and between each GPU and the updated Power8 CPU.

The IBM version, Morgan describes, aims to create a very brawny node with very tight coupling of GPUs and CPUs so they can better share memory, have fewer overall GPUs, and more bandwidth between the compute elements. IBM is aiming Minsky at HPC workloads, according to Morgan, but there is no reason it cannot be used for deep learning or even accelerated databases.

Is this where today’s z data center managers want to go?  No one is likely to spurn more performance, especially if it is accompanied with a price/performance improvement.  Whether rank-and-file z data centers are queueing up for AI or cognitive workloads will have to be seen. The sheer volume and scale of expected activity, however, will require some form of automated intelligent assist.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes for 2017

December 21, 2016

DancingDinosaur is taking the rest of the year off. The next posting will be Jan. 5. In the meantime, best wishes for delightful holidays and a peaceful and prosperous New Year. Good time to read a new book (below).

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Until then, based on comments IBM has hinted at we can expect a new z in 2017, might be the z14 as some suggest or something else. Expect it to be optimized for cognitive computing and the other strategic imperatives IBM has been touting for the past two years. But it also will need to satisfy the installed mainframe data center base so expect more I/O, faster performance, and improved price/performance.

Was nice to see LinuxONE come into its own late this year.  Expect to see much more from this z-based machine in 2017. Probably a new LinuxONE machine in the New Year as well.

And we can expect the new POWER9 this year.  That should perk things up a bit, but realistically, it appears IBM considers platform a dirty word. They really want to be a cloud player doing cognitive computing across a slew of vertical industries.

FYI, an important new book on IoT, Building the Internet of Things, by Maciej Kranz was published late in Nov. (See graphic above. It hit third place on the NY Times non-fiction best seller list in mid December. Not bad for a business tech book. You can find it on Amazon.com here. Kranz is a Cisco executive so if you have a relationship with a Cisco rep see if they’ll give you a free copy. Full disclosure: your blogger was the ghostwriter for the book and was thanked in the acknowledgements at the end of the book.  Like movies, Kranz and I have already started on the sequel, The Co-Economy (although the title may change). The new book is briefly described in the IoT book (pg. 161).

BTW, if you’ve always wanted to author a book but didn’t know how to start or finish or proceed, feel welcome to contact me through Technologywriter.com at the bottom of this post. We’ll figure out how to get it done.

Again, best wishes for the holidays. See you in the New Year.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here

IBM Demonstrates Blockchain Progress and Clients

December 9, 2016

IBM must have laid off its lawyers or something since never before has the company seemed so ready to reveal clients by name and the projects they’re engaged in.  That has been going on for months and recently it has accelerated.  Credit IBM’s eagerness to get blockchain established fast and show progress with the open community HyperLedger Project.

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Exploring the use of blockchain to bring safer food

Since early in 2016 IBM announced almost 20 companies and projects involving blockchain. A bunch are financial services as you would expect. A couple of government entities are included. And then, there is Walmart, a household name if ever there was one.  Walmart is turning to blockchain to manage its supply chain, particularly in regard to food safety and food provenance (tracking where the food came from and its path from source to shelf to the customer).

Here’s how it works: With blockchain, food products can be digitally tracked from an ecosystem of suppliers to store shelves and ultimately to consumers. When applied to the food supply chain, digital product information such as farm origination details, batch numbers, factory and processing data, expiration dates, storage temperatures and shipping detail are digitally connected to food items and the information is entered into the blockchain along every step of the process. Each piece of information provides critical data points that could potentially reveal food safety issues with the product. The information captured and if there is a problem it becomes easy to track down where the process went wrong.

Furthermore, the record created by the blockchain can also help retailers better manage the shelf-life of products in individual stores, and further strengthen safeguards related to food authenticity. In short, Walmart gains better visibility into the supply chain, logistics and food safety as they create a new model for food traceability, supply chain transparency, and auditability using IBM Blockchain based on the open source Linux Foundation Hyperledger Project fabric.

Walmart adds: “As advocates of promoting greater transparency in the food system for our customers, we look forward to working with IBM and Tsinghua University to explore how this technology might be used as a more effective food traceability solution,” said Frank Yiannas, Vice President, Food Safety, Walmart.  If successful, it might get rolled out to North America and the rest of the world.

IBM is not expecting blockchain to emerge full blown overnight. As it noted in its announcement on Wed. blockchain has the potential to transform the way industries conduct business transactions. This will require a complete ecosystem of industry players working together, allowing businesses to benefit from the network effect of blockchain. To that end IBM introduced a blockchain ecosystem to help accelerate the creation of blockchain networks.

And Walmart isn’t the only early adopter of the HyperLedger and blockchain.  The financial services industry is a primary target. For example, the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (BTMU) and IBM agreed to examine the design, management and execution of contracts among business partners using blockchain. This is one of the first projects built on the Hyperledger Project fabric, an open-source blockchain platform, to use blockchain for real-life contract management on the IBM Cloud.  IBM and BTMU have built a prototype of smart contracts on a blockchain to improve the efficiency and accountability of service level agreements in multi-party business interactions.

Another financial services player, the CLS Group (CLS), a provider of risk management and operational services for the global foreign exchange (FX) market, announced its intent to release a payment netting service, CLS Netting will use blockchain for buy-side and sell-side institutions’ FX trades that are settled outside the CLS settlement service. The system will have a Hyperledger-based platform, which delivers a standardized suite of post-trade and risk mitigation services for the entire FX market.

To make blockchain easy and secure, IBM has set up a LinuxONE z System as a cloud service for organizations requiring a secure environment for blockchain networks. IBM is targeting this service to organizations in regulated industries. The service will allow companies to test and run blockchain projects that handle private data. The secure blockchain cloud environment is designed for organizations that need to prove blockchain is safe for themselves and for their trading partners, whether customers or other parties.

As blockchain gains traction and organizations begin to evaluate cloud-based production environments for their first blockchain projects, they are exploring ways to maximize the security and compliance of the technology for business-critical applications. Security is critical not just within the blockchain itself but with all the technology touching the blockchain ledger.

With advanced features that help protect data and ensure the integrity of the overall network, LinuxONE is designed to meet the stringent security requirements of the financial, health care, and government sectors while helping foster compliance. As blockchain ramps up it potentially can drive massive numbers of transactions to the z. Maybe even triggering another discount as with mobile transactions.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

AI and IBM Watson Fuel Interest in App Dev among Mainframe Shops

December 1, 2016

BMC’s 2016 mainframe survey, covered by DancingDinosaur here, both directly and indirectly pointed to increased activity in regard to data center applications. Mainly this took the form of increased interest in Java on the z as a platform for new applications. Specifically, 72% of overall respondents reported using Java today while 88% reported plans to increase their use Java. At the same time, the use of Linux on the z has been steadily growing year over year; 41% in 2014, 48% in 2015, 52% in 2016. This growth of both point to a heightened interest in application development, management, and change.

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IBM’s Project DataWorks uses Watson Analytics to create complex visualizations with one line of code

IBM has been feeding this kind of AppDev interest with its continued enhancement of Bluemix and the rollout of the Bluemix Garage method.  More recently, it recently announced a partnership with Topcoder, a global software development community comprised of more than one million designers, developers, data scientists, and competitive programmers with the aim of stimulating developers looking to harness the power of Watson to create the next generation AI apps, APIs, and solutions.

According to Forrester VP and Principal Analyst JP Gownder in the IBM announcement, by 2019, automation will change every job category by at least 25%. Additionally, IDC predicts that 75% of developer teams will include cognitive/AI functionality in one or more applications by 2018. The industry is driving toward a new level of computing potential not witnessed since the introduction of Big Data

To further drive the cultivation of this new style of developer, IBM is encouraging participation in Topcoder-run hackathons and coding competitions. Here developers can easily access a range of Watson services – such as Conversation, Sentiment Analysis, or speech APIs – to build powerful new tools with the help of cognitive computing and artificial intelligence. Topcoder hosts 7,000 code challenges a year and has awarded $80 million to its community. In addition, now developers will have the opportunity to showcase and monetize their solutions on the IBM Marketplace, while businesses will be able to access a new pipeline of talent experienced with Watson and AI.

In addition to a variety of academic partnerships, IBM recently announced the introduction of an AI Nano degree program with Udacity to help developers establish a foundational understanding of artificial intelligence.  Plus, IBM offers the IBM Learning Lab, which features more than 100 curated online courses and cognitive uses cases from providers like Codeacademy, Coursera, Big Data University, and Udacity. Don’t forget, IBM DeveloperWorks, which offers how-to tutorials and courses on IBM tools and open standard technologies for all phases of the app dev lifecycle.

To keep the AI development push going, recently IBM unveiled the experimental release of Project Intu, a new system-agnostic platform designed to enable embodied cognition. The new platform allows developers to embed Watson functions into various end-user devices, offering a next generation architecture for building cognitive-enabled experiences.

Project Intu is accessible via the Watson Developer Cloud and also available on Intu Gateway and GitHub. The initiative simplifies the process for developers wanting to create cognitive experiences in various form factors such as spaces, avatars, robots, or IoT devices. In effect, it extends cognitive technology into the physical world. The platform enables devices to interact more naturally with users, triggering different emotions and behaviors and creating more meaningful and immersive experiences for users.

Developers can simplify and integrate Watson services, such as Conversation, Language, and Visual Recognition with the capabilities of the device to act out the interaction with the user. Instead of a developer needing to program each individual movement of a device or avatar, Project Intu makes it easy to combine movements that are appropriate for performing specific tasks like assisting a customer in a retail setting or greeting a visitor in a hotel in a way that is natural for the visitor.

Project Intu is changing how developers make architectural decisions about integrating different cognitive services into an end-user experience – such as what actions the systems will take and what will trigger a device’s particular functionality. Project Intu offers developers a ready-made environment on which to build cognitive experiences running on a wide variety of operating systems – from Raspberry PI to MacOS, Windows to Linux machines.

With initiatives like these, the growth of cognitive-enabled applications will likely accelerate. As IBM reports, IDC estimates that “by 2018, 75% of developer teams will include Cognitive/AI functionality in one or more applications/services.”  This is a noticeable jump from last year’s prediction that 50% of developers would leverage cognitive/AI functionality by 2018

For those z data centers surveyed by BMC that worried about keeping up with Java and big data, AI adds yet an entirely new level of complexity. Fortunately, the tools to work with it are rapidly falling into place.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

 

BMC Mainframe Survey Confirms z System Is Here to Stay

November 11, 2016

No surprise there. BMC’s 11th annual mainframe survey covering 1,200 mainframe executives and tech professionals found 58% of respondents reported usage of the mainframe is increasing as they look to capitalize on every infrastructure advantage it provides and add more workloads. Another 23% consider the mainframe as the best option to run critical work.

ibm_system_z10

IBM z10

Driving the continuing interest in the mainframe are the new demands for data handling, scalable processing, analytics, and more. According to the BMC survey nearly 60% of companies are seeing increased data and transaction volumes. They opt to stay with the mainframe for its highly secure, superior data handling and transaction serving, particularly as digital business adds unpredictability and volatility to workloads.

Overall respondents fell into three primary groups: 1) entrenched mainframe shops, 58% that are on board for the long haul; 2) shops, 23% that intend to maintain a steady amount of work on the mainframe; and 3) the 19% that are moving away from the mainframe.  The first two groups, committed mainframe shops, amount to just over survey 80% of the respondents.

Many companies surveyed are focused on addressing the increased workload demands, especially the rapidly growing demand for new applications. But surprisingly, the survey does not directly touch on hybrid cloud, cognitive computing or any of the latest technologies IBM has been promoting, not even DevOps, which can streamline mainframe application development and deployment. “We are not hearing much about a hybrid cloud environments or blockchain yet. Most companies seem to be in the early tire kicking stage, observed John McKenny, BMC Vice President, Strategy and Operations.

Eighty-eight percent of companies in the first group, entrenched mainframe shops, for example, are looking to increase the workloads they run on Java on the mainframe, primarily to address new application demands. It also doesn’t hurt that Java on the mainframe also can help lower data center costs by directing workloads to lower cost assist processors.

Other interesting BMC survey findings:

  • Half of the respondents report keeping 50% of their data on the mainframe and continue to invest in the platform for reasons you already know—security, availability, data serving capability
  • Continued steady growth of Linux in production on the z: 41% in 2014, 48% in 2015, 52% in 2016
  • Increased use of Java on the mainframe report as 67% of respondents cite need to meet growing application demand

Those looking to reduce mainframe presence cited three reasons: 1) perception of high cost, 2) outdated management understanding, and 3) looking for ways to reduce workloads over time.  DancingDinosaur has spoken with mainframe shops intending to migrate off the z and they cite the usual reasons, especially #1 above.

Top mainframe priorities for 2016 according to the BMC survey:  Cost reduction/optimization (65%); data privacy, compliance, security (50%); application availability (49%); application modernization (41%. Responses indicated the priorities for next year haven’t changed at all.

Surprisingly, many of the latest technologies for the z that IBM has touted recently have not yet shown up in the BMC survey responses, except maybe Java and Linux. This would include hybrid clouds, blockchain, IoT, and cognitive computing. IDC, for example, already is projecting cognitive computing to grow at a CAGR of 55.1% from 2016 to 2020. For z shops, however, cognitive computing appears almost invisible.

In some case with surveys like this you need to read between the lines. Where respondents report changes in activity levels driving application growth or the growth of interest in Java or the frequency of application changes and references to operational analytics they’re making oblique references to mobile or big data or even cognitive computing or other recent technologies for the z.

At its best, the BMC notes that digital technologies are transforming the ways in which mainframe shops conduct business and interact with their customers.  Adds BMC mainframe customer Credit Suisse: “IT departments are moving toward centralized, virtualized, and highly automated environments. This is being pursued to drive cost and processing efficiencies. Many companies realize that the Mainframe has provided these benefits for many years and is a mature and stable environment,” said Frank Cortell, Credit Suisse Director of Information Technology.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

Can SDS and Flash Resurrect IBM Storage?

November 4, 2016

As part of IBM’s ongoing string of quarterly losses storage has consistently contributed to the red ink, but the company is betting on cloud storage, all-flash strategy, and software defined storage (SDS) to turn things around. Any turn-around, however, is closely tied to the success of IBM’s strategic imperatives, which have emerged as bright spots amid the continuing quarterly losses; especially cloud, analytics, and cognitive computing.

climate-data-requires-fast-access-1

Climate study needs large amounts of fast data access

As a result, IBM needs to respond to two challenges created by its customers: 1) changes like the increased adoption of cloud, analytics, and most recently cognitive computing and 2) the need by customers to reduce the cost of the IT infrastructure. The problem as IBM sees it is this: How do I simultaneously optimize the traditional application infrastructure and free up money to invest in a new generation application infrastructure, especially if I expect move forward into the cognitive era at some point? IBM’s answer is to invest in flash and SDS.

A few years ago DancingDinosaur was skeptical, for example, that flash deployment would lower storage costs except in situations where low cost IOPS was critical. Today between the falling cost of flash and new ways to deploy increasingly cheaper flash DancingDinosaur now believes Flash storage can save IT real money.

According to the Evaluator Group and cited by IBM, flash and hybrid cloud technologies are dramatically changing the way companies deploy storage and design applications. As new applications are created–often for mobile or distributed access–the ability to store data in the right place, on the right media, and with the right access capability will become even more important.

In response, companies are adding cloud to lower costs, flash to increase performance, and SDS to add flexibility. IBM is integrating these capabilities together with security and data management for faster return on investment.  Completing the IBM pitch, the company offers choice among on-premise storage, SDS, or storage as a cloud service.

In an announcement earlier this week IBM introduced six products:

  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize 7.8 with transparent cloud tiering
  • IBM Spectrum Scale 4.2.2 with cloud data sharing
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize family flash enhancements
  • IBM Storwize family upgrades
  • IBM DS8880 High Performance Flash Enclosure Gen2
  • IBM DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server
  • VersaStack—a joint IBM-Cisco initiative

In short, these announcements address Hybrid Cloud enablement, as a standard feature for new and existing users of Spectrum Virtualize to enable data sharing to the cloud through Spectrum Scale, which can sync file and object data across on-premises and cloud storage to connect cloud native applications. Plus, more high density, highly scalable all-flash storage now sports a new high density expansion enclosure that includes new 7TB and 15TB flash drives.

IBM Storwize, too, is included, now able to grow up to 8x larger than previously without disruption. That means up to 32PB of flash storage in only four racks to meet the needs of fast-growing cloud workloads in space-constrained data centers. Similarly, IBM’s new DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server (ESS) offers up to 8x better performance than HDD-based solutions for big data and analytics workloads. Built with IBM Spectrum Scale ESS includes virtually unlimited scaling, enterprise security features, and unified file, object, and HDFS support.

The z can play in this party too. IBM’s DS8888 now delivers 2x better performance and 3x more efficient use of rack space for mission-critical applications such as credit card and banking transactions as well as airline reservations running on IBM’s z System or IBM Power Systems. DancingDinosaur first reported on the all flash z, the DS8888, when it was introduced last May.

Finally hybrid cloud enablement for existing and new on-premises storage enhancements through IBM Spectrum Virtualize, which brings hybrid cloud capabilities for block storage to the Storwize family, FlashSystem V9000, SVC, and VersaStack, the IBM-Cisco collaboration.

Behind every SDS deployment lies some actual physical storage of some type. Many opt for generic, low cost white box storage to save money.  As part of IBM’s latest SDS offerings you can choose among any of nearly 400 storage systems from IBM and others. Doubt any of those others are white box products but at least they give you some non-IBM options to potentially lower your storage costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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