Posts Tagged ‘logical partition (LPAR)’

LinuxONE is a Bargain

September 21, 2018

LinuxONE may be the best bargain you’ll ever find this season, and you don’t have to wait until Santa brings it down your chimney. Think instead about transformation and digital disruption.  Do you want to be in business in 3 years? That is the basic question that faces every organization that exists today, writes Kat Lind, Chief Systems Engineer, Solitaire Interglobal Ltd, author of the white paper Scaling the Digital Mountain.

Then there is the Robert Frances Group’s  Top 10 Reasons to Choose LinuxONE. DancingDinosaur won’t rehash all ten. Instead, let’s selectively pick a few, starting with the first one, Least Risk Solution, which pretty much encapsulates the LinuxONE story. It reduces business, compliance, financial, operations, and project risks. Its availability, disaster recovery, scalability and security features minimize the business and financial exposures. In addition to pervasive encryption it offers a range of security capabilities often overlooked or downplayed including; logical partition (LPAR) isolation, and secure containers.

Since it is a z dedicated to Linux, unlike the z13 or z14 z/OS machines that also run Linux but not as easily or efficiently,  As the Robert Frances Group noted: it also handles Java, Python; and other languages and tools like Hadoop, Docker, other containers, Chef, Puppet, KVM, multiple Linux distributions, open source, and more.  It also can be used in a traditional legacy environment or used as the platform of choice for cloud hosting. LinuxONE supports tools that enable DevOps similar to those on x86 servers.

And LinuxONE delivers world class performance. As the Robert Frances Group puts it: LinuxONE is capable of driving processor utilization to virtually 100% without a latency impact, performance instabilities, or performance penalties. In addition, LinuxONE uses the fastest commercially available processors, running at 5.2GHz, offloads I/O to separate processors enabling the main processors to concentrate on application workloads, and enables much more data in memory, up to 32TB.

In addition, you can run thousands of virtual machine instances on a single LinuxONE server. The cost benefit of this is astounding compared to managing the equivalent number of x86 servers. The added labor cost alone would break your budget.

In terms of security, LinuxONE is a no brainer. Adds Lind from Solitaire:  Failure in this area erodes an organization’s reputation faster than any other factor. The impact of breaches on customer confidence and follow-on sales has been tracked, and an analysis of that data shows that after a significant incursion, the average customer fall-off exceeds 41% accompanied by a long-running drop in revenues. Recovery involves a significant outlay of service, equipment, and personnel expenses to reestablish a trusted position, as much as 18.6x what it cost to get the customer initially. And Lind doesn’t even begin to mention the impact when the compliance regulators and lawyers start piling on. Anything but the most minor security breach will put you out of business faster than the three years Lind asked at the top of this piece.

But all the above is just talking in terms of conventional data center thinking. DancingDinosaur has put his children through college doing TCO studies around these issues. Lind now turns to something mainframe data centers are just beginning to think about; digital disruption. The strategy and challenges of successfully navigating the chaos of cyberspace translates into a need to have information on both business and security and how they interact.

Digital business and security go hand in hand, so any analysis has to include extensive correlation between the two. Using data from volumes of customer experience responses, IT operational details, business performance, and security, Solitaire examined the positioning of IBM LinuxONE in the digital business market. The results of that examination boil down into three: security, agility, and cost. These areas incorporate the primary objectives that organizations operating in cyberspace today regard as the most relevant. And guess who wins any comparative platform analysis, Lind concludes: LinuxONE.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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