Posts Tagged ‘machine learning’

IBM On-Premises Cognitive Means z Systems Only

February 16, 2017

Just in case you missed the incessant drumbeat coming out of IBM, the company committed to cognitive computing. But that works for z data centers since IBM’s cognitive system is available on-premises only for the z. Another z first: IBM just introduced Machine Learning (key for cognitive) for the private cloud starting with the z.

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There are three ways to get IBM cognitive computing solutions: the IBM Cloud, Watson, or the z System, notes Donna Dillenberger, IBM Fellow, IBM Enterprise Solutions. The z, however, is the only platform that IBM supports for cognitive computing on premises (sorry, no Power). As such, the z represents the apex of programmatic computing, at least as IBM sees it. It also is the only IBM platform that supports cognitive natively; mainly in the form of Hadoop and Spark, both of which are programmatic tools.

What if your z told you that a given strategy had a 92% of success. It couldn’t do that until now with IBM’s recently released cognitive system for z.

Your z system today represents the peak of programmatic computing. That’s what everyone working in computers grew up with, going all the way back to Assembler, COBOL, and FORTRAN. Newer languages and operating systems have arrived since; today your mainframe can respond to Java or Linux and now Python and Anaconda. Still, all are based on the programmatic computing model.

IBM believes the future lies in cognitive computing. Cognitive has become the company’s latest strategic imperative, apparently trumping its previous strategic imperatives: cloud, analytics, big data, and mobile. Maybe only security, which quietly slipped in as a strategic imperative sometime 2016, can rival cognitive, at least for now.

Similarly, IBM describes itself as a cognitive solutions and cloud platform company. IBM’s infatuation with cognitive starts with data. Only cognitive computing will enable organizations to understand the flood of myriad data pouring in—consisting of structured, local data but going beyond to unlock the world of global unstructured data; and then to decision tree-driven, deterministic applications, and eventually, probabilistic systems that co-evolve with their users by learning along with them.

You need cognitive computing. It is the only way, as IBM puts it: to move beyond the constraints of programmatic computing. In the process, cognitive can take you past keyword-based search that provides a list of locations where an answer might be located to an intuitive, conversational means to discover a set of confidence-ranked possibilities.

Dillenberger suggests it won’t be difficult to get to the IBM cognitive system on z . You don’t even program a cognitive system. At most, you train it, and even then the cognitive system will do the heavy lifting by finding the most appropriate training models. If you don’t have preexisting training models, “just use what the cognitive system thinks is best,” she adds. Then the cognitive system will see what happens and learn from it, tweaking the models as necessary based on the results and new data it encounters. This also is where machine learning comes in.

IBM has yet to document payback and ROI data. Dillenberger, however, has spoken with early adopters.  The big promised payback, of course, will come from the new insights uncovered and the payback will be as astronomical or meager as you are in executing on those insights.

But there also is the promise of a quick technical payback for z data centers managers. When the data resides on z—a huge advantage for the z—you just run analytics where the data is. In such cases you can realize up to 3x the performance, Dillenberger noted.  Even if you have to pull data from some other location too you still run faster, maybe 2x faster. Other z advantages include large amounts of memory, multiple levels of cache, and multiple I/O processors get at data without impacting CPU performance.

When the data and IBM’s cognitive system resides on the z you can save significant money. “ETL consumed huge amounts of MIPS. But when the client did it all on the z, it completely avoided the costly ETL process,” Dillenberger noted. As a result, that client reported savings of $7-8 million dollars a year by completely bypassing the x-86 layer and ETL and running Spark natively on the z.

As Dillenberger describes it, cognitive computing on the z is here now, able to deliver a payback fast, and an even bigger payback going forward as you execute on the insights it reveals. And you already have a z, the only on-premises way to IBM’s Cognitive System.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Continues Open Source Commitment with Apache Spark

June 18, 2015

If anyone believes IBM’s commitment to open source is a passing fad, forget it. IBM has invested billions in Linux, open Power through the Open Power Foundation, and more. Its latest is the announcement of a major commitment to Apache Spark, a fast open source and general cluster computing system for big data.

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Courtesy of IBM: developers work with Spark at Galvanize Hackathon

As IBM sees it, Spark brings essential advances to large-scale data processing. Specifically, it dramatically improves the performance of data dependent-apps and is expected to play a big role in the Internet of Things (IoT). In addition, it radically simplifies the process of developing intelligent apps, which are fueled by data. It does so by providing high-level APIs in Scala, Java, and Python, and an optimized engine that supports general computation graphs for data analysis. It also supports a rich set of higher-level tools including Spark SQL for SQL and DataFrames, MLlib for machine learning, GraphX for graph processing, and Spark Streaming for stream processing.

IBM is contributing its breakthrough IBM SystemML machine learning technology to the Spark open source ecosystem. Spark brings essential advances to large-scale data processing, such as improvements in the performance of data dependent apps. It also radically simplifies the process of developing intelligent apps, which are fueled by data. But maybe the biggest advantage is that it can handle data coming from multiple, disparate sources.

What IBM likes in Spark is that it’s agile, fast, and easy to use. It also likes it being open source, which ensures it is improved continuously by a worldwide community. That’s also some of the main reasons mainframe and Power Systems data centers should pay attention to Spark.  Spark will make it easier to connect applications to data residing in your data center. If you haven’t yet noticed an uptick in mobile transactions coming into your data center, they will be coming. These benefit from Spark. And if you look out just a year or two, expect to see IoT applications adding to and needing to combine all sorts of data, much of it ending up on the mainframe or Power System in one form or another. So make sure Spark is on your radar screen.

Over the course of the next few months, IBM scientists and engineers will work with the Apache Spark open community to accelerate access to advanced machine learning capabilities and help drive speed-to-innovation in the development of smart business apps. By contributing SystemML, IBM hopes data scientists iterate faster to address the changing needs of business and to enable a growing ecosystem of app developers who will apply deep intelligence to everything.

To ensure that happens, IBM will commit more than 3,500 researchers and developers to work on Spark-related projects at more than a dozen labs worldwide, and open a Spark Technology Center in San Francisco for the Data Science and Developer community to foster design-led innovation in intelligent applications. IBM also aims to educate more than 1 million data scientists and data engineers on Spark through extensive partnerships with AMPLab, DataCamp, MetiStream, Galvanize, and Big Data University MOOC (Massive Open Online Course).

Of course, Spark isn’t going to be the end of tools to expedite the latest app dev. With IoT just beginning to gain widespread interest expect a flood of tools to expedite developing IoT data-intensive applications and more tools to facilitate connecting all these coming connected devices, estimated to number in the tens of billions within a few years.

DancingDinosaur applauds IBM’s decade-plus commitment to open source and its willingness to put real money and real code behind it. That means the IBM z System mainframe, the POWER platform, Linux, and the rest will be around for some time. That’s good; DancingDinosaur is not quite ready to retire.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.


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