Posts Tagged ‘mainframe DevOps’

May 4, 2018

Compuware Tackles Mainframe Workforce Attrition and Batch Processing

While IBM works furiously to deliver quantum computing and expand AI and blockchain into just about everything, many DancingDinosaur readers are still wrestling with the traditional headaches and boosting quality and efficiency or mainframe operations and optimizing the most traditional mainframe activities there are, batch processes. Would be nice if quantum computing could handle multiple batch operations simultaneously but that’s not high on IBM’s list of quantum priorities.

So Compuware is stepping up as it has been doing quarterly by delivering new systems to expedite and facilitate conventional mainframe processes.  Its zAdviser promises actionable analytic insight to continuously improve quality, velocity and efficiency on the mainframe. While Compuware’s ThruPut Manager enables next-gen ITstaff to optimize mainframe batch execution through new visually intuitive workload scheduling.

zAdviser captures data about developers’ behaviors

zAdviser uses machine learning to continuously measure and improve an organization’s mainframe DevOps processes and development outcomes. Based on key performance indicators (KPIs), zAdviser measures application quality, as well as development speed and the efficiency of a development team. The result: managers can now make evidence-based decisions in support of their continuous improvement efforts.

The new tool leverages a set of analytic models that uncover correlations between mainframe developer behaviors and mainframe DevOps KPIs. These correlations represent the best available empirical evidence regarding the impact of process, training and tooling decisions on digital business outcomes. Compuware is offering zAdviser free to customers on current maintenance.

zAdviser leverages a set of analytic models that uncover correlations between mainframe developer behaviors and mainframe DevOps KPIs. These correlations represent the best available empirical evidence regarding the impact of process, training and tooling decisions on digital business outcomes.

Long mainframe software backlogs are no longer acceptable. Improvements in mainframe DevOps has become an urgent imperative for large enterprises that find themselves even more dependent on mainframe applications—not less. According to a recent Forrester Consulting study commissioned by Compuware, 57 percent of enterprises with a mainframe run more than half of their business-critical workloads on the mainframe. That percentage is expected to increase to 64 percent by 2019, while at the same time enterprises are failing to replace the expert mainframe workforce they have lost by attrition. Hence the need for modern, automated, intelligent tools to speed the learning curve for workers groomed on Python or Node.js.

Meanwhile, IBM hasn’t exactly been twiddling its thumbs in regard to DevOps analytics for the Z. Its zAware delivers a self-contained firmware IT analytics offering that helps systems and operations professionals rapidly identify problematic messages and unusual system behavior in near real time, which systems administrators can use to take corrective actions.

ThruPut Manager brings a new web interface that offers  visually intuitive insight for the mainframe staff, especially new staff, into how batch jobs are being initiated and executed—as well as the impact of those jobs on mainframe software licensing costs.

By implementing ThruPut Manager, Compuware explains, enterprises can better safeguard the performance of both batch and non-batch applications while avoiding the significant adverse economic impact of preventable spikes in utilization as measured by Rolling 4-Hour Averages (R4HA). Reducing the R4HA is a key way data centers can contain mainframe costs.

More importantly,  with the new ThruPut Manager, enterprises can successfully transfer batch management responsibilities to the next generation of IT staff with far less hands-on platform experience—without exposing themselves to related risks such as missed batch execution deadlines, missed SLAs, and excess costs.

With these new releases, Compuware is providing a way to reduce the mainframe software backlog—the long growing complaint that mainframe shops cannot deliver new requested functionality fast enough—while it offers a way to replace the attrition among aging mainframe staff with young staff who don’t have years of mainframe experience to fall back on. And if the new tools lower some mainframe costs however modestly in the process, no one but IBM will complain.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.


%d bloggers like this: