Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

Dinosaurs Strike Back in IBM Business Value Survey

March 2, 2018

IBM’s Institute of Business Value (IBV) recently completed a massive study based 12,000 interviews of executives of legacy c-suite companies. Not just CEO and CIO but COO, CFO, CMO, and more, including the CHO. The CHO is the Chief Happiness Officer. Not sure what a CHO actually does but if one had been around when DancingDinosaur was looking for a corporate job he might have stayed on the corporate track instead of pursuing the independent analyst/writer dream.

(unattributed IBM graphic)

IBV actually referred to the study as “Incumbents strike back.” The incumbents being the legacy businesses the c-suite members represent. In a previous c-suite IBV study two years ago, the respondents expressed concern about being overwhelmed and overrun by new upstart companies, the born-on-the-web newcomers. In many ways the execs at that time felt they were under attack.

Spurred by fear, the execs in many cases turned to a new strategy that takes advantage of what has always been their source of strength although they often lacked the ways and means to take advantage of that strength; the huge amounts of data they have gathered and stored, for decades in some cases. With new cognitive systems now able to extract and analyze this legacy data and combine it with new data, they could actually beat some of the upstarts. Finally, they could respond like nimble, agile operations, not the lumbering dinosaurs as they were often portrayed.

“Incumbents have become smarter about leveraging valuable data, honing their employees’ skills, and in some cases, acquired possible disruptors to compete in today’s digital age,” the study finds, according to CIO Magazine, which published excerpts from the study here. The report reveals 72 percent of surveyed CxOs claimed the next wave of disruptive innovation will be led by the incumbents who pose a significant competitive threat to new entrants and digital players. By comparison, the survey found only 22 percent of respondents believe smaller companies and start-ups are leading disruptive change. This presents a dramatic reversal from a similar but smaller IBV survey two years ago.

Making possible this reversal is not only growing awareness among c-level execs of the value of their organizations’ data and the need to use it to counter the upstarts, but new technologies, approaches like DevOps, easier-to-use dev tools, the increasing adoption of Linux, and mainframes like the z13, z14, and LinuxONE, which have been optimized for hybrid and cloud computing.  Also driving this is the emergence of platform options as a business strategy.

The platform option may be the most interesting decision right now. To paraphrase Hamlet, to be (a platform for your industry) or not to be. That indeed is a question many legacy businesses will need to confront. When you look at platform business models, what is right for your organization. Will you create a platform for your industry or piggyback on another company’s platform? To decide you need to first understand the dynamics of building and operating a platform.

The IBV survey team explored that question and found the respondents pretty evenly divided with 54% reporting they won’t while the rest expect to build and operate a platform. This is not a question that you can ruminate over endlessly like Hamlet.  The advantage goes to those who can get there first in their industry segment. Noted IBV, only a few will survive in any one industry segment. It may come down to how finely you can segment the market for your platform and still maintain a distinct advantage. As CIO reported, the IBV survey found 57 percent of disruptive organizations are adopting a platform business model.

Also rising in importance is the people-talent-skills issue. C-level execs have always given lip service to the importance of people as in the cliché people are our greatest asset.  Based on the latest survey, it turns out skills are necessary but not sufficient. Skills must be accompanied by the right culture. As the survey found:  Companies that have the right culture in place are more successful. In that case, the skills are just an added adrenalin shot. Still the execs put people skills in top three. The IBV analysts conclude: People and talent is coming back. Guess we’re not all going to be replaced soon with AI or cognitive computing, at least not yet.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at and here.

IBM Boosts DevOps with ADDI on Z

February 9, 2018

IBM’s Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence (ADDI) is an analytical platform for application modernization. It uses cognitive technologies to analyze mainframe applications so you can quickly discover and understand interdependencies and impacts of change. You can use this intelligence to transform and renew these applications faster than ever. Capitalize on time-tested mainframe code to engage the API economy. Accelerate application transformation of your IBM Z hybrid cloud environment and more.

Formerly, ADDI was known as EZSource. Back then EZSource was designed to expedite digital transformations by unlocking core business logic and apps. Specifically it enabled the IT team to pinpoint specific mainframe code in preparation for leveraging IT through a hybrid cloud strategy. In effect it enabled the understanding business-critical assets in preparation of deployment of a z-centered hybrid cloud. This also enabled enterprise DevOps, which was necessary to keep up with the pace of changes overtaking existing business processes.

This wasn’t easy when EZSource initially arrived and it still isn’t although the intelligence built into ADDI makes it easier now.  Originally it was intended to help the mainframe data center team to:

  • Identify API candidates to play in the API economy
  • Embrace micro services to deliver versatile apps fast
  • Identify code quality concerns, including dead code, to improve reliability and maintainability
  • Mitigate risk of change through understanding code, data, and schedule interdependencies
  • Aid in sizing the change effort
  • Automate documentation to improve understanding
  • Reduce learning curve as new people came onboarded
  • Add application understanding to DevOps lifecycle information to identify opportunities for work optimization

Today, IBM describes Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence (ADDI), its follow-up to EZSource, as an analytical platform for application modernization. It uses cognitive technologies to analyze mainframe applications so your team can quickly discover and understand interdependencies and impacts of any change. In theory you should be able to use this intelligence to transform and renew these applications more efficiently and productively. In short, it should allow you to leverage time-tested mainframe code to engage with the API economy and accelerate the application transformation on your IBM Z and hybrid cloud environment.

More specifically, it promises to enable your team to analyze a broad range of IBM and non-IBM programing languages, databases, workload schedulers, and environments. Enterprise application portfolios were built over decades using an ever-evolving set of technologies, so you need a tool with broad support, such as ADDI, to truly understand the relationships between application components and accurately determine the impacts of potential changes.

In practice, it integrates with mainframe environments and tools via a z/OS agent to automatically synchronize application changes. Without keeping your application analysis synchronized with the latest changes that your developers made, according to IBM, your analysis can get out of date and you risk missing critical changes.

In addition, it provides visual analysis integrated with leading IDEs. Data center managers are petrified of changing applications that still work, fearing they will inadvertently break it or slow performance. When modifying complex applications, you need to be able to quickly navigate the dependencies between application components and drill down to see relevant details. After you understand the code, you can then effectively modify it at much lower risk. The integration between ADDI and IBM Developer for z (IDz) combines the leading mainframe IDE with the application understanding and analytics capabilities you need to safely and efficiently modify the code.

It also, IBM continues, cognitively optimizes your test suites.  When you have a large code base to maintain and manyf tests to run, you must run the tests most optimally. ADDI correlates code coverage data and code changes with test execution records to enable you to identify which regression tests are the most critical, allowing you to optimize time and resources while reducing risk. It exposes poorly tested or complex code and empowers the test teams with cognitive insights that turns awareness of trends into mitigation of future risks.

Finally, ADDI intelligently identifies performance degradations before they hit production. It correlates runtime performance data with application discovery data and test data to quickly pinpoint performance degradation and narrow down the code artifacts to those that are relevant to the cause of bad performance. This enables early detection of performance issues and speeds resolution.

What’s the biggest benefit of ADDI on the Z? It enables your data center to play a central role in digital transformation, a phrase spoken by every c-level executive today as a holy mantra. But more importantly, it will keep your mainframe relevant.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.

IBM Halts Losing Quarterly Slide

January 25, 2018

With all respects to Casey at Bat author Ernest Thayer, joy may have returned to Mudville. IBM finally broke its 22 consecutive quarters losing streak and posted positive results in 4Q 17.  Fourth-quarter revenue of $22.5 billion, up 4 percent but that was just the start.

Watson and Weather Co. track flu

IBM is counting on its strategic imperatives to come through big and they did in 2017. Full-year strategic imperatives revenue of $36.5 billion, up 11 percent; represents 46 percent of IBM revenue. Similarly, IBM is making some gains in the highly competitive cloud business where IBM is fighting to position itself among the top ranks of formidable cloud players—Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. IBM did quite respectably in the cloud, posting $17 billion in cloud revenue, up 24 percent year to year.

DancingDinosaur readers will be interested to know that some of IBM’s various business segments, which have been a steady drain on IBM revenue turned things around in the 4th quarter. For example, Systems (systems hardware and operating systems software) saw revenues of $3.3 billion, up 32 percent driven by growth in IBM Z, Power Systems, and storage. That’s important to readers charged with planning their organization’s future with the Z or Power machines. They now can be confident that IBM mightn’t the sell the business tomorrow as it did with the x86 systems.

So where might IBM go in the future. “Our strategic imperatives revenue again grew at a double-digit rate and now represents 46 percent of our total revenue, and we are pleased with our overall revenue growth in the quarter.” said Ginni Rometty, IBM chairman, president, and CEO.  She then continued: “During 2017, we established IBM as the blockchain leader for business. Looking ahead, we are uniquely positioned to help clients use data and AI to build smarter businesses.”

Added James Kavanaugh, IBM CFO: “Over the past several years we have invested aggressively in technology and our people to reposition IBM.  2018 will be all about reinforcing IBM’s leadership position,” he continued, “in key high-value segments of the IT industry, including cloud, AI, security and blockchain.”

IBM has done well in some business and technology segments. Specifically, the company reported gains in revenues from analytics, up 9 percent, mobile, up 23 percent, and security, up a whopping 132 percent.

Other segments have not done as well. Technology Services & Cloud Platforms (includes infrastructure services, technical support services, and integration software) continue to lose money. A number of investment analysts are happy with IBM’s financials but are not optimistic about what they portend for IBM’s future.

For instance, Bert Hochfeld, long/short equity, growth, event-driven, research analyst, writes in Seeking Alpha, “the real reason why strategic imperatives and cloud showed relatively robust growth last quarter has nothing to do with IBM’s pivots and everything to do with the success of IBM’s mainframe cycle. IBM’s Z system achieved 71% growth last quarter compared to 62% in the prior quarter. New Z Systems are being delivered with pervasive encryption, they are being used to support hybrid cloud architectures, and they are being used to support Blockchain solutions… Right now, the mainframe performance is above the prior cycle (z13) and consistent with the z12 cycle a few years ago. And IBM has enjoyed some reasonable success with its all-flash arrays in the storage business. Further, the company’s superscalar offering, Power9, is having success and, as many of its workloads are used for AI, its revenues get counted as part of strategic initiatives. But should investors count on a mainframe cycle and a high-performance computer cycle in making a long-term investment decision regarding IBM shares?

He continued: “IBM management has suggested that some of the innovations in the current product range including blockchain, cryptography, security and reliability will make this cycle different, and perhaps longer, then other cycles. The length of the mainframe cycle is a crucial component in management’s earnings estimate. It needs to continue at elevated levels at least for another couple of quarters. While that is probably more likely, is it really prudent to base an investment judgement on the length of a mainframe cycle?

Of course, many DancingDinosaur readers are basing their career and employment decisions on the mainframe or Power Systems. Let’s hope this quarter’s success encourages them; it sure beats 22 consecutive quarters of revenue declines.

Do you remember how Thayer’s poem ends? With the hopes and dreams of Mudville riding on him, it is the bottom of the 9th; Casey takes a mighty swing and… strikes out! Let’s hope this isn’t IBM.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.

Compuware Brings Multi-Platform DevOps to the Z

January 19, 2018

The rush has started to DevOps for Z. IBM jumped on the bandwagon with an updated release of IBM Developer for z Systems (IDz) V14.1.1, which allows Z organizations to provide new capabilities and product maintenance to users sooner than the traditional release models they previously used from IBM.

Even more recently, Compuware, which described DevOps and the mainframe as the ultimate win-win, announced a program to advance DevOps on the mainframe with integrated COBOL code coverage metrics for multi-platform DevOps.  This will make it possible for all developers in the organization to fluidly handle multi-platform code, including mainframe code, in a fast delivery DevOps approach.

SonarSource-Compuware DevOps Dashboard

The new Compuware-SonarSource integrations are expected to ease enterprise DevOps teams trying to track and validate code coverage of COBOL application testing and do it with the same ease and employing the same processes as they do with Java and other more mainstream code. This ability to automate code coverage tracking across platforms is yet another example of empowering enterprise IT to apply the same proven and essential Agile, DevOps and Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) disciplines to both core systems-of-record (mainframe) as well as systems-of-engagement (mostly distributed systems).

Code coverage metrics promise insight into the degree to which source code is executed during a test. It identifies  which lines of code have been executed, and what percentage of an application has been tested. These measurements allow IT teams to understand the scope and effectiveness of its testing as code is moved towards production.

DevOps has become increasingly critical to mainframe shops that risk becoming irrelevant and even replaceable if they cannot turn around code improvements fast enough. The mainframe continues to be valued as the secure repository of the organization’s critical data but that won’t hold off those who feel the mainframe is a costly extravagance, especially when mainframe shops can’t turn out code updates and enhancements as fast as systems regarded as more inherently agile.

As Compuware puts it, the latest integrations automatically feed code coverage results captured by its Topaz for Total Test into SonarSource’s SonarQube. This gives DevOps teams an accurate, unified view of quality metrics and milestones across platforms enterprise-wide.

For z shops specifically, such continuous code quality management across platforms promises high value to large enterprises, enabling them to bring new digital deliverables to market, which increasingly is contingent on simultaneously updating code across both back-end mainframe systems-of-record and front-end mobile/web and distributed systems-of-engagement.

Specifically, notes Compuware, integration between Topaz for Total Test and SonarQube enables DevOps teams to:

  • Gain insight into the coverage of code being promoted for all application components across all platforms
  • Improve the rigor of digital governance with strong enforcement of mainframe QA policies for coding errors, data leakage, credential vulnerabilities, and more
  • Shorten feedback loops to speed time-to-benefit and more promptly address shortfalls in COBOL skills and bottlenecks in mainframe DevOps processes

Topaz for Total Test captures code coverage metrics directly from the source code itself, rather than from a source listing, as is the case with outdated mainframe tools. This direct capture is more accurate and eliminates the need for development, Compuware reported.

The new integration actually encompasses a range of tools and capabilities. For instance:

From within a Compuware Xpediter debug session, a developer can kick off a Compuware Topaz for Total Test automated unit test and set it up to collect code coverage info as it runs. Code coverage metrics then can be automatically fed into SonarSource’s SonarQube where they can be displayed in a dashboard along with other quality metrics, such as lines going to subprograms.

It also integrates with Jenkins as a Continuous Integration (CI) platform, which acts as a process orchestrator and interacts with an SCM tool, such as Compuware ISPW, which automates software quality checks and pushes metrics onto SonarQube among other things. ISPW also is where code gets promoted to the various stages within the lifecycle and ultimately deployed. Finally Topaz is Compuware’s Eclipse-based IDE from which developers drive all these activities.

The Compuware announcement further delivers on its promise to mainstream the mainframe; that is, provide a familiar, modern, and intuitive multi-platform mainframe development environment—integrated with state-of-the-art DevOps tools for veteran mainframe developers and, more importantly, those newly engaged as IT newbies from the distributed world. In short, this is how you keep your Z relevant and invaluable going forward.

** Special note regarding last week’s DancingDinosaur reporting on chip problems here; Don’t count on an immediate solution coming from the vendors anytime soon; not Google, IBM, Intel, AMD, ARM, or others. The word among chip geeks is that the dependencies are too complex to be fully fixed with a patch. This probably requires new chip designs and fabrication. DancingDinosaur will keep you posted.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.

BMC’s 12th Annual Mainframe Survey Shows Z Staying Power

November 17, 2017

ARM processors are invading HPC and supercomputer segments. The Power9 is getting closer and closer to general commercial availability. IBM unveiled not one but two new quantum computers. Meanwhile, the Z continues to roll right along without skipping a beat, according to BMC’s 12th mainframe survey.

There is no doubt that the computing landscape is changing dramatically and will continue to change. Yet mainframe shops appear to be taking it all in stride. As Mark Wilson reported on the recently completed SHARE Europe conference in the UK, citing the keynote delivered by Compuware’s CEO Chris O’Malley: “By design, the post-modern mainframe is the most future ready platform in the world: the most reliable, securable, scalable, and cost efficient. Unsurprisingly, the mainframe remains the dominant, growing, and vital backbone for the worldwide economy. However, outdated processes and tools ensnared in an apathetic culture doggedly resistant to change, prevent far too many enterprises from unleashing its unique technical virtues and business value.”  If you doubt we are entering the post-modern mainframe era just look at the LinuxONE Emperor II or the z14.

Earlier this month BMC released its 12th annual mainframe survey. Titled 5 Myths Busted, you can find the report here.  See these myths right below:

  • Myth 1: Organizations have fully optimized mainframe availability
  • Myth 2: The mainframe is in maintenance mode; no one is modernizing
  • Myth 3: Executives are planning to replace their mainframes
  • Myth 4: Younger IT professionals are pessimistic about mainframe careers
  • Myth 5: People working on the mainframe today are all older

Everyone from prestigious executives like O’Malley to a small army of IBMers to lowly bloggers and analysts like DancingDinosaur have been pounding away at discrediting these myths for years. And this isn’t the first survey to thoroughly discredit mainframe skeptics.

The mainframe is growing: 48% of respondents saw MIPS growth in the last 12 months, over 50% of respondents forecast MIPS growth in the next 12 months, and 71% of large shops (10,000 MIPS or more) experienced MIPS growth in the last year. Better yet, these same shops forecast more growth in the next 12 months.

OK, the top four priorities of respondents remained the same this year. The idea that mainframe shops, however, are fully optimized and just cruising is dead wrong. Survey respondents still have a list of to-do of priorities:

  1. Cost reduction/optimization
  2. Data privacy/compliance
  3. Availability
  4. Application modernization

Maybe my favorite myth is that younger people have given up on the mainframe. BMC found that 53% of respondents are under age 50 and of this group, (age 30-49 with under 10 years of experience) overwhelmingly report a very positive view of the the mainframe future. The majority went so far as to say they see the workload of their mainframe growing and also view the mainframe as having a strong position of growth in the industry overall. This is reinforced by the growth of IBM’s Master of the Mainframe competition, which attracts young people in droves, over 85,000 to date, to work with the so-called obsolete mainframe.

And the mainframe, both the Z and the LinuxONE, is packed with technology that will continue to attract young people: Linux, Docker, Kubernetes, Java, Spark, and support for a wide range of both relational databases like DB2 and NoSQL databases like MongoDB. They use this technology to do mobile, IoT, blockchain, and more. Granted most mainframe shops are not ready yet to run these kinds of workloads. IBM, however, even introduced new container pricing for the new Z to encourage such workloads.

John McKenny, BMC’s VP of Strategy, has noticed growing interest in new workloads. “Yes, they continue to be mainly transactional applications but they are aimed to support new digital workloads too, such as doing business with mobile devices,” he noted.  Mobility and analytics, he added, are used increasingly to improve operations, and just about every mainframe shop has some form of cloud computing, often multiple clouds.

The adoption of Linux on the mainframe a decade ago imediatey put an end to the threat posed by x86. Since then, IBM has become a poster child for open source and a slew of new technologies, from Java to Hadoop to Spark to whatever comes next. Although traditional mainframe data centers have been slow to adopt these new technologies some are starting, and that along with innovative machines like the z14 and LinuxONE Emperor ll are what, ultimately, will keep the mainframe young and competitive.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.

Compuware Brings the Mainframe to AWS

October 6, 2017

IBM talks about the power of the cloud for the mainframe and has turned Bluemix into a cloud development and deployment platform for open systems. Where’s the Z?

Now Compuware has made for the past several years quarterly advances in its mainframe tooling, which are now  available through AWS. Not only have those advances made mainframe management and operations more intuitive and graphical through a string of Topaz releases, but with AWS it is now more accessible from anywhere. DancingDinosaur has been reporting on Compuware’s string of Topaz advances for two years, here, here, and here.

By tapping the power of both the cloud and the mainframe, enterprises can deploy Topaz to their global development workforce in minutes, accelerating the modernization of their mainframe environments. As Compuware noted: mainframe shops now have the choice of deploying Topaz on-premise or on AWS. By leveraging the cloud, they can deploy Topaz more quickly, securely, and scale without capital costs while benefiting from new Topaz features as soon as the company delivers them.

To make Topaz work on AWS Compuware turned to Amazon AppStream 2.0 technology, which provides for global development, test, and ops teams with immediate and secure cloud access to Compuware’s entire innovative mainframe Agile/DevOps solution stack, mainly Topaz. Amazon AppStream 2.0 is a fully managed, secure application streaming service that allows users to stream desktop applications from AWS to any device running a web browser.

Cloud-based deployment of Topaz, Compuware notes, allows for significantly faster implementation, simple administration, a virtual integrated development environment (IDE), adaptive capacity, and immediate developer access to software updates. The last of these is important, since Compuware has been maintaining a quarterly upgrade release schedule, in effect delivering new capabilities every 90 days.

Compuware is in the process of patenting technology to offer an intuitive, streamlined configuration menu that leverages AWS best practices to make it easy for mainframe admins to quickly configure secure connectivity between Topaz on AWS and their mainframe environment. It also enables the same connectivity to their existing cross-platform enterprise DevOps toolchains running on-premise, in the cloud, or both. The upshot: organizations can deploy Topaz across their global development workforce in minutes, accelerating the modernization of their mainframe environments.

Using Topaz on AWS, notes Compuware, mainframe shops can benefit in a variety of ways, specifically:

  • Modify, test and debug COBOL, PL/I, Assembler and other mainframe code via an Eclipse-based virtual IDE
  • Visualize complex and/or undocumented application logic and data relationships
  • Manage source code and promote artifacts through the DevOps lifecycle
  • Perform common tasks such as job submission, review, print and purge
  • Leverage a single data editor to discover, visualize, edit, compare, and protect mainframe files and data

The move to the Eclipse-based IDE presents a giant step for traditional mainframe shops trying to modernize. Eclipse is a leading open source IDE with IBM as a founding member. In addition to Eclipse, Compuware also integrates with other modern tools, including Jenkins, SonarSource, Altassian. Jenkins is an open source automation server written in Java that helps to automate the non-human part of software development process with continuous integration while facilitating technical aspects of continuous delivery. SonarSource enables visibility into mainframe application quality. Atlassian develops products for software developers, project managers, and content management and is best known for Jira, its issue tracking application.

Unlike many mainframe ISVs, Compuware has been actively partnering with various innovative vendors to extend the mainframe’s tool footprint and bring the kind of tools to the mainframe that young developers, especially Millennials, want. Yes, it is possible to access the sexy REST-based Web and mobile tools through IBM’s Bluemix, but for mainframe shops it appears kludgy. By giving its mainframe customers access through AWS to advanced tools, Compuware improves on this. And AWS beats Bluemix in terms of cloud penetration and low cost.

All mainframe ISVs should make their mainframe products accessible through the cloud if they want to keep their mainframe products relevant. IBM has its cloud; of course there is AWS, Microsoft has Azure, and Google rounds out the top four. These and others will keep cloud economics competitive for the foreseeable future. Hope to see you in the cloud.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.


IBM Promises Easy Fast Data Protection

September 1, 2017

Data protection used to be simple. You simply made a couple of copies of your data and stored them someplace safe. That hasn’t worked for years with most enterprises and certainly won’t work going forward. There are too many systems and data. Now you have to contend with virtual machines, NoSQL databases, cloud storage, and more. In the face of growing compliance mandates and threats like ransomware, and a bevy of data protection threats data protection has gotten much more complicated.

Last week IBM simplified it again by announcing IBM Spectrum Protect Plus. It promises to make data protection available in as little as one hour.

IBM achieves tape breakthrough

Turned out August proved to be a good month for IBM storage. In addition to introducing Spectrum Protect Plus IBM and Sony researchers achieved a record of 201 Gb/in2 (gigabits per square inch) in areal density. That translates into the potential to record up to about 330 terabytes (TB) of uncompressed data on a single tape cartridge. Don’t expect commercially available products with this density soon. But you will want it sooner than you may think as organizations face the need to collect, store, and protect massive amounts of data for a wide range of use cases, from surveillance images to analytics to cognitive to, eventually, quantum computing.

IBM Spectrum Protect Plus delivers data availability using snapshot technology for rapid backup, recovery and data management. Designed to be used by virtual machines (VM) and application administrators, it also provides data clone functionality to support and automate DevOps workflows. Unlike other data availability solutions, IBM Spectrum Protect Plus performs data protection and monitoring based on automated Service Level Agreements to ensure proper backup status and retention compliance, noted IBM.

The company has taken to referring Spectrum Protect Plus as the future of data protection, recovery and data reuse. IBM designed it to be fast, modern, light weight, low cost, easy to use, and simple to deploy while delivering rapid time to value.  As noted at the top, the company claims it can make effective data protection available in an hour without relying on highly trained storage experts. Spectrum Protect Plus, delivers data protection, according to IBM, “anyone can manage,” adding that it installs in less than 15 mins.

You get instant data and virtual machine recovery, which you grab from a snapshot. It is so slick, IBM managers say, that “when someone sends you a ransomware letter you can just laugh at them.” Only, of course, if you have been diligent in making backups. Don’t blame the Protect Plus tool, which is thoroughly automated behind scenes. It was announced last week but won’t be available until the fourth quarter of this year.

Protect Plus also brings a handful of new goodies for different stakeholders, as IBM describes it:

  • CIOs get a single view of the backup and recovery status across the data portfolio and the elimination of silos of data backup and recovery.
  • Senior IT Manager (VM and Application Admins) can rapidly self-serve their data availability without complexity. IBM Spectrum Protect Plus also provides an ability to integrate the VM and application backups into the business rules of the enterprise.
  • Senior Application LOB owners can experience data lifecycle management with near instantaneous recovery, copy management, and global search for fast data access and recovery

Specifically designed for virtual machine (VM) environments to support daily administration the product rapidly deploys without agents. It also features a simple, role-based user interface (UI) with intuitive global search for fast recovery.

Data backup and recovery, always a pain in the neck, has gotten even far more complex. For an enterprise data center facing stringent data protection and compliance obligations and juggling the backup of virtual and physical systems, probably across multiple clouds and multiple data centers the challenges and risks have grown by orders of magnitude. You will need tools like Spectrum Protect Plus, especially the Plus part, which IBM insists is a completely new offering.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.



New Software Pricing for IBM Z

July 27, 2017

One of the often overlooked benefits of the introduction of a new mainframe like the Z is cost savings. Even though the machine may cost more, the cost of the performance and capabilities it delivers typically cost less on a per unit basis. In the case of the new Z, it’s not just a modest drop in price/performance. With the new Z, IBM announced, three new Container Pricing models for IBM Z, providing greatly simplified software pricing that promises flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments.

Working on the new IBM Z

Here are the three biggest software pricing changes:

  • Predictable and Transparent Container Pricing—providing organizations greatly simplified software pricing that combines flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments. To IBM, a container can be any address space, however large and small. You can have any number of containers. “Container Pricing provides collocated workloads with line-of-sight pricing to a solution,” explained Ray Jones, VP, IBM Z Software and Hybrid Cloud. With container pricing, Jones continued, “the client determines where to deploy using WLM, z/OS and SCRT do the rest.”
  • Application dev and test—highly competitive stand-alone pricing for z/OS based development and test workloads. Organizations can increase their DevTest capacity up to 3 times at no additional MLC cost. This will be based on the organization’s existing DevTest workload size. Or a company can choose the multiplier it wants and set the reference point for both MLC and OTC software.
  • Payment systems pricing are based on the business metric of payments volume a bank processes, not the available capacity. This gives organizations much greater flexibility to innovate affordably in a competitive environment, particularly in the fast-growing Instant Payment segment. To use the new per payment pricing, Jones added, up front licensing of IBM Financial Transaction Manager (FTM) software is required.

The Container Pricing options are designed to give clients the predictability and transparency they require for their business. The pricing models are scalable both within and across logical partitions (LPARs) and deliver greatly enhanced metering, capping and billing capabilities. Container Pricing for IBM Z is planned to be available by year-end 2017 and enabled in z/OS V2.2 and z/OS V2.3

Jones introduced the software discounts by reiterating that this was focused on software container pricing for IBM z and promised that there will be a technology software benefit with z14 as there was with the z13. IBM, he added, will offer a way to migrate to the new pricing, “This is a beginning of a new beginning. Clearly as we go forward we want to expand what’s applicable to container pricing.” His clear implication: IBM is intent on expanding the discounting it started when, several years ago, it introduced discounts for mobile transactions running on the z, which was driving up monthly software cost averages as mobile transaction volume began to skyrocket.

To understand the latest changes you need to appreciate what IBM means by container. This is not just about Docker containers. A container to IBM simply is an address space.  An organization can have multiple containers in a logical partition and have as many containers as it wants and change the size of containers as needed.

The fundamental advantage of IBM’s container pricing is that it enables co-location of workloads to get improved performance and remove latency, thus IBM’s repeated references to line-of-sight pricing. In short, this is about MLC (4hr) pricing. The new pricing eliminates what goes on in container from consideration. The price of container is just that; the price of the container. It won’t impact the 4hr rolling average, resulting in very predictable pricing.

The benefits are straightforward: simplified pricing for qualified solutions and allowance to deploy in the best way. And IBM can price competitively to the customer’s solution; in effect solution-specific pricing. When combined with the new price metric-payments pricing IBM trying to put together a competitive cost/price story. Of course, it is all predicated on the actual prices IBM finally publishes.  Let’s hope they are as competitive as IBM implies.

DancingDinosaur never passes up an opportunity to flog IBM for overpricing its systems and services. From discussions with Jones and other IBM during the pre-launch briefings managers the company may finally understand the need to make the mainframe or z or Z or whatever IBM calls it price-competitive on an operational level today. Low TCO or low cost of IOPS or low cost of QoS is not the same.

This is especially important now. Managers everywhere appear to be waking up to the need transform their mainframe-based businesses, at least in part, by becoming competitive digital businesses. DancingDinosaur never imagined that he would post something referencing the mainframe as a cost-competitive system able to rival x86 systems not just on quality of service but on cost. With the IBM Z the company is talking about competing with an aggressive cost strategy. It’s up to you, paying customers, to force them to deliver.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.


IBM Resurrects Moore’s Law

June 23, 2017

Guess Moore’s Law ain’t as dead as we were led to believe. On Jun 5 IBM and Research Alliance partners GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung, along with equipment suppliers announced the development of an industry-first process to build silicon nano sheet transistors that will enable 5nm chips. Previously, IBM announced a 7nm process using a silicon germanium (SiGe) alloy.

As DancingDinosaur wrote in early Oct. 2015, the last z System that conformed to the expectations of Moore’s Law was the zEC12, introduced Aug 2012. IBM could boast then it had the fastest commercial processor available.  The subsequent z13 didn’t match it in processor speed.  The z13 chip runs a 22 nm core at 5 GHz, one-half a GHz slower than the zEC12, which ran its 32nm core at 5.5 GHz. IBM compensated for the slower chip speed by adding more processors throughout the system to boost I/O and other functions and optimizing the box every way possible.

5nm silicon nano-sheet transistors delivers 40% performance gain

By 2015, the z13 delivered about a 10 percent performance bump per core thanks to the latest tweaks in the core design, such as better branch prediction and better pipelining. But even at one-half Ghz slower, the z13 was the first system to process 2.5 billion transactions a day.  Even more importantly for enterprise data centers, z13 transactions are persistent, protected, and auditable from end-to-end, adding assurance as mobile transactions grow to an estimated 40 trillion mobile transactions per day by 2025. The z13 also received and continues to receive praise for its industry leading security ratings as well as its scalability and flexibility.

Just recently Hitachi announced a partnership with IBM to develop a version of the z13 to run its own operating system, VOS3. The resulting z13 will run the next generation of Hitachi’s AP series.

But IBM isn’t back in pursuit of Moore’s Law just to deliver faster traditional mainframe workloads. Rather, the company is being driven by its strategic initiatives, mainly cognitive computing. As IBM explained in the announcement: The resulting increase in performance will help accelerate cognitive computing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and other data-intensive applications delivered in the cloud. The power savings could also mean that the batteries in smartphones and other mobile products could last two to three times longer than today’s devices, before needing to be charged.

Scientists working as part of the IBM-led Research Alliance at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering’s NanoTech Complex in Albany, NY achieved the breakthrough by using stacks of silicon nanosheets as the device structure of the transistor instead of the standard FinFET architecture, which is the blueprint for the semiconductor industry up through 7nm node technology. “For business and society to meet the demands of cognitive and cloud computing in the coming years, advancement in semiconductor technology is essential,” said Arvind Krishna, senior vice president, Hybrid Cloud, and director, IBM Research in the announcement. “That’s why IBM aggressively pursues new and different architectures and materials that push the limits of this industry, and brings them to market in technologies like mainframes and our cognitive systems.”

Compared to the leading edge 10nm technology available in the market, according to IBM, a nanosheet-based 5nm technology can deliver 40 percent performance enhancement at fixed power, or 75 percent power savings at matched performance. This improvement enables a significant boost to meeting the future demands of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, virtual reality, and mobile devices.

These may not sound like the workloads you are running on your mainframe now, but systems with these chips are not going to be shipped in the next mainframe either. So, you have a couple of years. The IBM team expects to make progress toward commercializing 7nm in 2018. By the time they start shipping 5nm systems you might be desperate for a machine to run such workloads and others like them.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.


IBM On-Premises Cognitive Means z Systems Only

February 16, 2017

Just in case you missed the incessant drumbeat coming out of IBM, the company committed to cognitive computing. But that works for z data centers since IBM’s cognitive system is available on-premises only for the z. Another z first: IBM just introduced Machine Learning (key for cognitive) for the private cloud starting with the z.


There are three ways to get IBM cognitive computing solutions: the IBM Cloud, Watson, or the z System, notes Donna Dillenberger, IBM Fellow, IBM Enterprise Solutions. The z, however, is the only platform that IBM supports for cognitive computing on premises (sorry, no Power). As such, the z represents the apex of programmatic computing, at least as IBM sees it. It also is the only IBM platform that supports cognitive natively; mainly in the form of Hadoop and Spark, both of which are programmatic tools.

What if your z told you that a given strategy had a 92% of success. It couldn’t do that until now with IBM’s recently released cognitive system for z.

Your z system today represents the peak of programmatic computing. That’s what everyone working in computers grew up with, going all the way back to Assembler, COBOL, and FORTRAN. Newer languages and operating systems have arrived since; today your mainframe can respond to Java or Linux and now Python and Anaconda. Still, all are based on the programmatic computing model.

IBM believes the future lies in cognitive computing. Cognitive has become the company’s latest strategic imperative, apparently trumping its previous strategic imperatives: cloud, analytics, big data, and mobile. Maybe only security, which quietly slipped in as a strategic imperative sometime 2016, can rival cognitive, at least for now.

Similarly, IBM describes itself as a cognitive solutions and cloud platform company. IBM’s infatuation with cognitive starts with data. Only cognitive computing will enable organizations to understand the flood of myriad data pouring in—consisting of structured, local data but going beyond to unlock the world of global unstructured data; and then to decision tree-driven, deterministic applications, and eventually, probabilistic systems that co-evolve with their users by learning along with them.

You need cognitive computing. It is the only way, as IBM puts it: to move beyond the constraints of programmatic computing. In the process, cognitive can take you past keyword-based search that provides a list of locations where an answer might be located to an intuitive, conversational means to discover a set of confidence-ranked possibilities.

Dillenberger suggests it won’t be difficult to get to the IBM cognitive system on z . You don’t even program a cognitive system. At most, you train it, and even then the cognitive system will do the heavy lifting by finding the most appropriate training models. If you don’t have preexisting training models, “just use what the cognitive system thinks is best,” she adds. Then the cognitive system will see what happens and learn from it, tweaking the models as necessary based on the results and new data it encounters. This also is where machine learning comes in.

IBM has yet to document payback and ROI data. Dillenberger, however, has spoken with early adopters.  The big promised payback, of course, will come from the new insights uncovered and the payback will be as astronomical or meager as you are in executing on those insights.

But there also is the promise of a quick technical payback for z data centers managers. When the data resides on z—a huge advantage for the z—you just run analytics where the data is. In such cases you can realize up to 3x the performance, Dillenberger noted.  Even if you have to pull data from some other location too you still run faster, maybe 2x faster. Other z advantages include large amounts of memory, multiple levels of cache, and multiple I/O processors get at data without impacting CPU performance.

When the data and IBM’s cognitive system resides on the z you can save significant money. “ETL consumed huge amounts of MIPS. But when the client did it all on the z, it completely avoided the costly ETL process,” Dillenberger noted. As a result, that client reported savings of $7-8 million dollars a year by completely bypassing the x-86 layer and ETL and running Spark natively on the z.

As Dillenberger describes it, cognitive computing on the z is here now, able to deliver a payback fast, and an even bigger payback going forward as you execute on the insights it reveals. And you already have a z, the only on-premises way to IBM’s Cognitive System.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at and here.


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