Posts Tagged ‘NAND’

IBM Revamps V5000

April 5, 2019

On April 2nd IBM announced several key enhancements across the Storwize V5000 portfolio and along with new models. These new models include the V5010E, 5030E and the V5100. The E stands for EXPRESS.) To further complicate the story, it utilizes Broadwell, Intel’s new 14 nanometer die shrink of its Haswell microarchitecture. Broadwell did not completely replace the full range of CPUs from Intel’s previous Haswell microarchitecture but IBM is using it widely in the new V5000 models.

IBM NVMe Flash Core Module

And the results can be impressive. From a scale-out perspective the V5010E supports a single controller configuration, while the V5030E and V5100 both support up to two controller clusters. This provides for a maximum of 392 drives in the V5010E and a massive 1520 drives in either the V5030E or V5100 dual controller clusters. The V5030E includes the Broadwell DE 1.9GHz, 6 core processor in its two canisters. Each canister supports a maximum of 32GB of RAM. Better still, the V5100 boasts a single Skylake 1.7Ghz processor with 8 cores in each canister. RAM is increased to a total of 576GB for the entire controller, or 288GB maximum per canister.

.For the next generation Storwize V5000 platforms IBM encouraging them to be called Gen3. The Gen3 encompasses 8 new MTM (Machine Type Model) based on 3 hardware models, V5010E, V5030E and V5100. The V5100 comes in two models, a hybrid (HDD and Flash) and the All Flash model V5100F. Of these 4 types, each is available with a 1 year or 3 year warranty.

The V5000E models are based on the Gen2 hardware, with various enhancements, including more memory options on the V5010E. The V5100 models are all new hardware and bring same NVMe Flash Core Modules (FCM) that are available on the V7000 and FlashSystem9100 products, completing Core Modules the transition of the Storwize family to all NVMe arrays. If you haven’t seen or heard about IBM’s FCM technology introduced last year to optimize NVMe FCM are a family of high-performance flash drives that utilizes the NVMe protocol, a PCIe Gen3 interface, and high-speed NAND memory to provide high throughput and IOPS and very low latency. FCM is available in 4.8 TB, 9.6 TB, and 19.2 TB capacities. Hardware-based data compression and self-encryption are built in.

The all flash (F) variants of the V5000 can also attach SAS expansions to extend capacity using SAS based Flash drives to allow expansion up to 1520 drives. The drives, however, are not interchangeable with the new FCM drives. The E variants allow attachment of SAS 2.5” and 3.5” HDD drives, with the V5010E expandable to 392 drives and the others up to 1520.

Inbuilt host attachments come in the form of 10GbE ports for iSCSI workloads, with optional 16Gbit FibreChannel (SCSI or FC-NVMe) as well as additional 10GbE or 25GbE iSCSI. The V5100 models can also use the iSER (an iSCSI translation layer for operation over RDMA transports, such as InfiniBand) protocol over the 25GbE ports for clustering capability, with plans to support NVMeF over Ethernet. In terms of cache memory, the V5000E products are expandable up to 64GB per controller (IO Group) and the V5100 can support up to 576GB per controller. Similarly, IBM issued as a statement of direction for all 25GbE port types across the entire Spectrum Virtualize family of products.

As Lloyd Dean, IBM Senior Certified Executive IT Architect noted, the new lineup for the V5000 is impressive; regarding the quantity of drives, and the storage available per model will “blow your mind”. How mind blowing will depend, of course, on your configuration and IBM’s pricing. As usual, IBM talks about affordable and comparative cost and storage efficiency but they usually never state a price. But they did once 3 years ago: List price then for the V5010 was $9,250 including hardware, software and a one-year warranty, according to a published report. Today IBM will likely steer you to cloud pricing, which may or may not be a bargain depending on how the deal is structured and priced. With the cloud, everything is in the details.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.


%d bloggers like this: