Posts Tagged ‘NVIDIA’

Open POWER-Open Compute-POWER9 at Open Compute Summit

March 16, 2017

Bryan Talik, President, OpenPOWER Foundation provides a detailed rundown on the action at the Open Compute  Summit held last week in Santa Clara. After weeks of writing about Cognitive, Machine Learning, Blockchain, and even quantum computing, it is a nice shift to conventional computing platforms that should still be viewed as strategic initiatives.

The OpenPOWER, Open Compute gospel was filling the air in Santa Clara.  As reported, Andy Walsh, Xilinx Director of Strategic Market Development and OpenPOWER Foundation Board member explained, “We very much support open standards and the broad innovation they foster. Open Compute and OpenPOWER are catalysts in enabling new data center capabilities in computing, storage, and networking.”

Added Adam Smith, CEO of Alpha Data:  “Open standards and communities lead to rapid innovation…We are proud to support the latest advances of OpenPOWER accelerator technology featuring Xilinx FPGAs.”

John Zannos, Canonical OpenPOWER Board Chair chimed in: For 2017, the OpenPOWER Board approved four areas of focus that include machine learning/AI, database and analytics, cloud applications and containers. The strategy for 2017 also includes plans to extend OpenPOWER’s reach worldwide and promote technical innovations at various academic labs and in industry. Finally, the group plans to open additional application-oriented workgroups to further technical solutions that benefits specific application areas.

Not surprisingly, some members even see collaboration as the key to satisfying the performance demands that the computing market craves. “The computing industry is at an inflection point between conventional processing and specialized processing,” according to Aaron Sullivan, distinguished engineer at Rackspace. “

To satisfy this shift, Rackspace and Google announced an OCP-OpenPOWER server platform last year, codenamed Zaius and Barreleye G2.  It is based on POWER9. At the OCP Summit, both companies put on a public display of the two products.

This server platform promises to improve the performance, bandwidth, and power consumption demands for emerging applications that leverage machine learning, cognitive systems, real-time analytics and big data platforms. The OCP players plan to continue their work alongside Google, OpenPOWER, OpenCAPI, and other Zaius project members.

Andy Walsh, Xilinx Director of Strategic Market Development and OpenPOWER Foundation Board member explains: “We very much support open standards and the broad innovation they foster. Open Compute and OpenPOWER are catalysts in enabling new data center capabilities in computing, storage, and networking.”

This Zaius and Barreleye G@ server platforms promise to advance the performance, bandwidth and power consumption demands for emerging applications that leverage the latest advanced technologies. These latest technologies are none other than the strategic imperatives–cognitive, machine learning, real-time analytics–IBM has been repeating like a mantra for months.

Open Compute Projects also were displayed at the Summit. Specifically, as reported: Google and Rackspace, published the Zaius specification to Open Compute in October 2016, and had engineers to explain the specification process and to give attendees a starting point for their own server design.

Other Open Compute members, reportedly, also were there. Inventec showed a POWER9 OpenPOWER server based on the Zaius server specification. Mellanox showcased ConnectX-5, its next generation networking adaptor that features 100Gb/s Infiniband and Ethernet. This adaptor supports PCIe Gen4 and CAPI2.0, providing a higher performance and a coherent connection to the POWER9 processor vs. PCIe Gen3.

Others, reported by Talik, included Wistron and E4 Computing, which showcased their newly announced OCP-form factor POWER8 server. Featuring two POWER8 processors, four NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPUs with the NVLink interconnect, and liquid cooling, the new platform represents an ideal OCP-compliant HPC system.

Talik also reported IBM, Xilinx, and Alpha Data showed their line ups of several FPGA adaptors designed for both POWER8 and POWER9. Featuring PCIe Gen3, CAPI1.0 for POWER8 and PCIe Gen4, CAPI2.0 and 25G/s CAPI3.0 for POWER9 these new FPGAs bring acceleration to a whole new level. OpenPOWER member engineers were on-hand to provide information regarding the CAPI SNAP developer and programming framework as well as OpenCAPI.

Not to be left out, Talik reported that IBM showcased products it previously tested and demonstrated: POWER8-based OCP and OpenPOWER Barreleye servers running IBM’s Spectrum Scale software, a full-featured global parallel file system with roots in HPC and now widely adopted in commercial enterprises across all industries for data management at petabyte scale.  Guess compute platform isn’t quite the dirty phrase IBM has been implying for months.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Revamped IBM Power Systems LC Takes on x86

September 9, 2016

To hear IBM, its revamped and refreshed Power Systems LC lineup will undermine x86 (Intel), HPE, Dell/EMC, and any other purveyor of x86-based systems. Backed by accelerators provided by OpenPower community members, IBM appears ready extend the x86 battle to on premises, in the cloud, and the hybrid cloud. It promises to deliver better performance at lower cost for all the hot workloads too: artificial intelligence, deep learning, high performance data analytics, and compute-heavy workloads.

ibm-power-systems-s821lc

Two POWER8 processors, 1U config, priced 30% less than an x86 server

Almost a year ago, Oct. 2015, DancingDinosaur covered IBM previous Power Systems LC announcement here. The LC designation stands for Linux Community, and the company is tapping accelerators and more from the OpenPower community, just as it did with its recent announcement of POWER9 expected in 2017, here.

The new Power LC systems feature a set of community delivered technologies IBM has dubbed POWERAccel, a family of I/O technologies designed to deliver composable system performance enabled by accelerators. For GPU acceleration the NVDIA NVLink delivers nearly 5x better integration between POWER processors and the NVIDIA GPUs.  For FPGA acceleration IBM tapped its own CAPI architecture to integrate accelerators that run natively as part of the application.

This week’s Power Systems LC announcement features three new machines:

  • S821LC (pictured above)—includes 2 POWER8 sockets in a 1U enclosure and intended for environments requiring dense computing.
  • S822LC—brings 2 POWER8 sockets for big data workloads and adds big data acceleration through CAPI and GPUs.
  • S822LC—intended for high performance computing, it incorporates the new POWER8 processor with the NVDIA NVLink to deliver 2.8x the bandwidth to GPU accelerators and up to 4 integrated NVIDIA Pascal GPUs.

POWER8 with NVLink delivers 2.8 x the bandwidth compared to a PCle data pipe. According to figures provided by IBM comparing the price-performance of the Power S822LC for HPC (20-core, 256 GB, 4x Pascal) with a Dell C4130 (20-core, 256 GB 4xK80) and measured by total queries per hour (gph) the Power System delivered 2.1x better price-performance.  The Power Systems server cost more ($66,612) vs. the Dell ($57,615) but the Power System delivered 444 qph vs. Dell’s 185 qph.

The story plays out similarly for big data workloads running MongoDB on the IBM Power S8221LC for big data (20-core, 128 GB) vs. an HP DL380 (20-core, 128 GB). Here the system cost (server, OS, MongoDB annual subscription) came to $24,870 for IBM Power and $29,915 for HP.  Power provided 40% more performance at a 31% lower hardware/maintenance cost.

When it comes to the cloud the new IBM Power Systems LC offerings get even more interesting from a buyer’s standpoint. IBM declared the cloud a strategic imperative about 2 years ago and needs to demonstrate adoption that can rival the current cloud leaders; AWS, Google, and Microsoft (Azure). To that end IBM has started to tack on free cloud usage.

For example, during the industry analyst launch briefing IBM declared: Modernize your Power infrastructure for the Cloud, get access to IBM Cloud for free and cut your current operating costs by 50%. Whether you’re talking on-premises cloud or hybrid infrastructure the freebies just come. The free built-in cloud deployment service options include:

  • Cloud Provisioning and Automation
  • Infrastructure as a Service
  • Cloud Capacity Pools across Data Centers
  • Hybrid Cloud with BlueMix
  • Automation for DevOps
  • Database as a Service

These cover both on-premises, where you can transform your traditional infrastructure with automation, self-service, and elastic consumption models or a hybrid infrastructure where you can securely extend to Public Cloud with rapid access to compute services and API integration. Other freebies include open source automation, installation and configuration recipes, cross data center inventory, performance monitoring via the IBM Cloud, optional DR as a service for Power, and free access and capacity flexibility with SolfLayer (12 month starter pack).

Will the new LC line and its various cloud freebies get the low cost x86 monkey off IBM’s back? That’s the hope in Armonk. The new LC servers can be acquired at a lower price and can deliver 80% more performance per dollar spent over x86-based systems, according to IBM. This efficiency enables businesses and cloud service providers to lower costs and combat data center sprawl.

DancingDinosaur has developed TCO and ROI analyses comparing mainframe and Power systems to x86 for a decade, maybe more.  A few managers get it, but most, or their staff, have embedded bias and will never accept non-x86 machines. To them, any x86 system always is cheaper regardless of the specs and the math. Not sure even free will change their minds.

The new Power Systems LC lineup is price-advantaged over comparatively configured Intel x86-based servers, costing 30% less in some configurations.  Online LC pricing begins at $5999. Additional models with smaller configurations sport lower pricing through IBM Business Partners. All but the HPC machine are available immediately. The HPC machine will ship Sept. 26.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Power Systems LC Aims to Expand the Power Systems Market

October 8, 2015

IBM is rapidly trying to capitalize on its investment in POWER technology and the OpenPOWER Foundation to expand the POWER franchise. The company is offering up the  Power Systems LC Server family; LC for Linux Community. This addresses how processing will be used in the immediate future; specifically in Hybrid Cloud, Hyperscale Data Centers, and Open Solutions. You could probably throw in IoT and big data/real-time analytics too although those weren’t specifically mentioned in any of the LC announcement materials or briefings.

Linux Community 1 lc server

Courtesy of IBM:  the new Power S822LC (click to enlarge)

The LC Server family  comes with a new IBM go-to-market strategy, as IBM put it: buy servers the way you want to buy them; online with simple pricing and a one-click purchase (coming soon). Your choice of standard configurations or have your configuration customized to meet your unique needs through IBM’s global ecosystem of partners and providers. Same with a selection of service and support options from an array of IBM technology partners.

There appear to be three basic configurations at this point:

  1. Power Systems S812LC: designed for entry and small Hadoop workloads
  2. Power Systems S822LC for Commercial Computing: ideal for data in the cloud and flexible capacity for MSPs
  3. Power Systems S822LC for High Performance Computing: for cluster deployments across a broad range of industries

According to the latest S812LC spec sheet, the IBM 8348 Power System S812LC server with POWER8 processors is optimized for data and Linux. It is designed to deliver superior performance and throughput for high-value Linux workloads such as industry applications, open source, big data, and LAMP.  It incorporates OpenPOWER Foundation innovations for organizations that want the advantages of running their big data, Java, open source, and industry applications on a platform designed and optimized for data and Linux. Modular in design, the Power S812LC is simple to order and can scale from single racks to hundreds.

The Power S812LC server supports one processor socket, offering 8-core 3. 32 GHz or 10-core 2.92 GHz POWER8 configurations in a 19-inch rack-mount, 2U drawer configuration. All the cores are activated. The server provides 32 DIMM memory slots. Memory features supported are 4 GB (#EM5A), 8 GB (#EM5E), 16 GB (#EM5C), and 32 GB (#EM5D), allowing for a maximum system memory of 1024 GB.

The LC Server family will leverage a variety of innovations that have been brought out by various members of the OpenPOWER Foundation over the last few months.  These include innovations from Wistron, redislabs, Tyan, Nvidia, Mellanox, Ubuntu, and Nallatech in the areas of big data, GPU acceleration, HPC, and cloud. And, of course, IBM’s CAPI.

No actual pricing was provided. In response to a question from DancingDinosaur about whether the arrival of products from the OpenPOWER Foundation was driving down Power Systems prices, the response was a curt: “We haven’t seen the drag down,” said an IBM manager. Oh well, so much for an imminent price war over Power Systems.

However, IBM reported today that  based on its own internal testing, a new Power Systems LC server can complete an average of select Apache Spark workloads – including analyzing Twitter feeds, streaming web page views and other data-intensive analytics – for less than half the cost of an Intel E5-2699 V3 processor-based server, providing clients with 2.3x better performance per dollar spent. Additionally, the efficient design of a Power Systems LC server allows for 94% more Spark social media workloads in the same rack space as a comparable Intel-based server.

These new systems are exactly what is needed to make the POWER platform viable over the long term, and it can’t be just an IBM show. With OpenPOWER Foundation members delivering innovations there is no telling what can be done in terms of computing with POWER9 and POWER10 when they come.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

OpenPOWER Starts Delivering the Goods

March 13, 2015

Are you leery of multi-vendor consortiums? DancingDinosaur as a rule is skeptical of the grand promises they make until they actually start delivering results. That was the case with OpenPOWER last spring when you read here that the OpenPOWER Foundation was introduced and almost immediately forgotten.

 power8 cpu blocks

IBM POWER8 processor, courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

But then last fall DancingDinosaur reported on NVIDIA and its new GPU accelerator integrated directly into the server here. This too was an OpenPOWER Foundation-based initiative. Suddenly, DancingDinosaur is thinking the OpenPOWER Foundation might actually produce results.

For example, IBM introduced a new range of systems capable of handling massive amounts of computational data faster at nearly 20 percent better price/performance than comparable Intel Xeon v3 Processor-based systems. The result:  a superior alternative to closed, commodity-based data center servers. Better performance and at a lower price. What’s not to like?

The first place you probably want to apply this improved price/performance is to big data, which generates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data across the planet every day. Even the miniscule portion of this amount that you actually generate will very quickly challenge your organization to build a sufficiently powerful technology infrastructures to gain actionable insights from this data fast enough and at a price you can afford.

The commodity x86 servers used today by most organizations are built on proprietary Intel processor technology and are increasingly stretched to their limits by workloads related to big data, cloud and mobile. By contrast, IBM is designing a new data centric approach to systems that leverages the building blocks of the OpenPOWER Foundation.

This is plausible given the success of NVIDIA with its GPU accelerator. And just this past week Altera demonstrated its OpenPOWER-based FPGA, now being used by several other Foundation members who are collaborating to develop high-performance compute solutions that integrate IBM POWER chips with Altera’s FPGA-based acceleration technologies.

Formed in late 2013, the OpenPOWER Foundation has grown quickly from 5 founders to over 100 today. All are collaborating in various ways to leverage the IBM POWER processor’s open architecture for broad industry innovation.

IBM is looking to offer the POWER8 core and other future cores under the OpenPOWER initiative but they are also making previous designs available for licensing. Partners are required to contribute intellectual property to the OpenPOWER Foundation to be able to gain high level status. The earliest successes have been around accelerators and such, some based on POWER8’s CAPI (Coherence Attach Processor Interface) expansion bus built specifically to integrate easily with external coprocessors like GPUs, ASICs and FPGAs. DancingDinosaur will know when the OpenPOWER Foundation is truly on the path to acceptance when a member introduces a non-IBM POWER8 server. Have been told that may happen in 2015.

In the meantime, IBM itself is capitalizing on the OpenPower Foundation. Its new IBM Power S824L servers are built on IBM’s POWER8 processor and tightly integrate other OpenPOWER technologies, including NVIDIA’s GPU accelerator. Built on the OpenPOWER stack, the Power S824L provides organizations the ability to run data-intensive tasks on the POWER8 processor while offloading other compute-intensive workloads to GPU accelerators, which are capable of running millions of data computations in parallel and are designed to significantly speed up compute-intensive applications.

Further leveraging the OpenPOWER Foundation at the start of March IBM announced that SoftLayer will offer OpenPOWER servers as part of its portfolio of cloud services. Organizations will then be able to select OpenPOWER bare metal servers when configuring their cloud-based IT infrastructure from SoftLayer, an IBM company. The servers were developed to help organizations better manage data-intensive workloads on public and private clouds, effectively extending their existing infrastructure inexpensively and quickly. This is possible because OpenPOWER servers leverage IBM’s licensable POWER processor technology and feature innovations resulting from open collaboration among OpenPOWER Foundation members.

Due in the second quarter, the SoftLayer bare metal servers run Linux applications and are based on the IBM POWER8 architecture. The offering, according to IBM, also will leverage the rapidly expanding community of developers contributing to the POWER ecosystem as well as independent software vendors that support Linux on Power and are migrating applications from x86 to the POWER architecture. Built on open technology standards that begin at the chip level, the new bare metal servers are built to assist a wide range of businesses interested in building custom hybrid, private, and public cloud solutions based on open technology.

BTW, it is time to register for IBM Edge2015 in Las Vegas May 10-15. Edge2015 combines all of IBM’s infrastructure products with both a technical track and an executive track.  You can be sure DancingDinosaur will be there. Watch for upcoming posts here that will highlight some of the more interesting sessions.DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Builds Out POWER8 Systems

October 3, 2014

Just in time for IBM Enterprise 2014, which starts on Monday in Las Vegas, IBM announced some new Power8 systems and a slew of new capabilities. Much of this actually was first telegraphed earlier in September here, but now it is official. Expect the full unveiling at IBM Enterprise2014.

The new systems are the Power E870 and the Power E880. The E870 includes up to 80 POWER8 cores in 32-40 nodes and as much as 4TB of memory. The Power 880 will scale up to 128 POWER8 cores and promises even more in the next rev. It also sports up to 16TB of memory, again with more coming. This should be more than sufficient to perform analytics on significant workloads and deliver insights in real time. The E880 offers also enterprise storage pools to absorb varying shifts in workloads and handle up to 20 virtual machines per core.

Back in December, DancingDinosaur referred to the Power System 795 as a RISC mainframe.  It clearly has been superseded by the POWER8 E880 in terms for sheer performance although the E880 is architected primarily for data analytics. There has been no hint of a refresh of the Power 795, which hasn’t even gotten the Power7 + chip yet. Only two sessions at Enterprise2014 address the Power System 795. Hmmm.

The new POWER8 machines boast some impressive benchmarks as of Sept. 12, 2014: AP SD 2-tier, SPECjbb2013, SPECint_rate2006 and SPECfp_rate2006).  Specifically, IBM is boasting of the fastest performing core in the industry: 1.96x or better than the best Intel Xeon Ivy Bridge and 2.29x better than the best Oracle SPARC. In each test the new POWER8 machine ran less than 2/3 of the cores of the competing machine, 10 vs. 15 or 16 respectively.

In terms of value, IBM says the new POWER8 machines cost less than competing systems, delivering 1000 users per core, double its nearest competitor. When pressed by DancingDinosaur on its cost analysis, IBM experts explained they set up new Linux apps on an enterprise class POWER8 system and priced out a comparably configured system from HP based on its published prices. For the new POWER8 systems IBM was able to hold the same price point, which turned out to be 30% less expensive for comparable power given the chip’s increased performance. By factoring in the increase in POWER8 performance and the unchanged price IBM calculated it had the lowest cost for comparable performance. Recommend you run your actual numbers.

The recent announcement also included the first fruits of the OpenPower Foundation, an accelerator from NVIDIA.  The new GPU accelerator, integrated directly into the server, is aimed at larger users of big data analytics, especially those using NoSQL databases.  The accelerator is incorporated into a new server, the Power System S824L, which includes up to 24 POWER8 cores, 1 TB of memory and up to 2 NVIDIA K40 GPU accelerators.  It also includes a bare metal version of Ubuntu Linux. IBM reports it runs extracting patterns for a variety of analytics, big data, and technical computing workloads involving large amounts of data 8x faster.

Another new goodie, one based on OpenStack, is IBM Power Virtualization Center (PowerVC), billed as new advanced virtualization management that promises to simplify the creation and management of virtual machines on IBM Power Systems servers using PowerVM or PowerKVM hypervisors. By leveraging OpenStack, it should enable IBM Power System servers to integrate into a Software Defined Environment (SDE) and provide the necessary foundation required for the delivery of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) within the Cloud.

Finally, as part of the Power8 announcements, IBM unveiled Power Enterprise Pools, a slick capacity-on-demand technology also called Power Systems Pools.  It offers a highly resilient and flexible IT environment to support of large-scale server consolidation and meet demanding business applications requirements. Power Enterprise Pools allow for the aggregation of compute resources, including processors and memory, across a number of Power systems. Previously available for the Power 780 and 795, it is now available on large POWER8 machines.

Am off to IBM Enterprise2014 this weekend. Hope to see you there. When not in sessions look for me wherever the bloggers hang out (usually where there are ample power outlets to recharge laptops and smartphones). Also find me at the three evenings of live performances: 2 country rock groups, Delta Rae and The Wild Feathers and then, Rock of Ages. Check out all three here.

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. You can follow this blog and more on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Also, find me at Technologywriter.com.

Open POWER Consortium Aims to Expand the POWER Ecosystem beyond IBM

August 7, 2013

With IBM’s August 6 announcement of new POWER partners, including Google, not only is IBM aiming to expand the variety of POWER workloads but establish an alternative ecosystem to Intel/ x86 that continues to dominate general corporate computing.  Through the new Open POWER Consortium, IBM will make  POWER hardware and software available for open development for the first time as well as offer open-source POWER firmware, the software that controls basic chip functions. By doing this, IBM and the consortium can enable innovative customization in creating new styles of server hardware for a variety of computing workloads.

IBM has a long history of using open consortiums to grab a foothold in different markets;  as it did with Eclipse (open software development tools), Linux (open portable operating system), KVM (open hypervisor and virtualization), and OpenStack (open cloud interoperability). In each case, IBM had proprietary technologies but could use the open source consortium strategy to expand market opportunities at the expense of entrenched proprietary competitors like Microsoft or VMware.  The Open POWER Consortium opens a new front against Intel, which already is scrambling to fend off ARM-based systems and other lightweight processors.

The establishment of the Open POWER Consortium also reinforces IBM’s commitment to the POWER platform in the face of several poor quarters. The commitment to POWER has never really wavered, insists an IBM manager, despite what financial analysts might hint at. Even stronger evidence of that commitment to POWER is POWER8, which is on track for 2014 if not sooner, and POWER9, which is currently in development, he confirmed.

As part of its initial collaboration within the consortium, IBM reported it and NVIDIA will integrate NVIDIA’s CUDA GPU and POWER.  CUDA is a parallel computing platform and programming model that enables dramatic increases in computing performance by harnessing the power of the graphics processing unit (GPU).  GPUs increasingly are being used to boost overall system performance, not just graphics performance. The two companies envision powerful computing systems based on NVIDIA GPUs and IBM’s POWER CPUs  and represent an example of the new kind of systems the open consortium can produce.

However, don’t expect immediate results.  The IBM manager told DancingDinosaur that the fruits of any collaboration won’t start showing up until sometime next year. Even the Open POWER Collaboration website has yet to post anything. The consortium is just forming up; IBM expects the public commitment of Google to attract other players, which IBM describes as the next generation of data-center innovators.

As for POWER users, this can only be a good thing. IBM is not reducing its commitment to the POWER roadmap, plus users will be able to enjoy whatever the new players bring to the POWER party, which could be considerable. In the meantime, the Open POWER Consortium welcomes any firm that wants to innovate on the POWER platform and participate in an open, collaborative effort.

An even more interesting question may be where else will IBM’s interest in open systems and open consortiums take it. IBM remains “very focused on open and it’s a safe bet that IBM will continue to support open technologies and groups that support that,” the IBM manager told DancingDinosaur.  IBM, however, has nothing to announce after the Open POWER Consortium. Hmm, might a z/OS open collaborative consortium someday be in the works?

SHARE will be in Boston next week. DancingDinosaur expects to be there and will report on the goings-on. Hope to see some of you there.  There also are plans for a big IBM System z/Power conference, Enterprise Systems 2013, toward to end of October in Florida.  Haven’t seen many details yet, but will keep you posted as they come in.


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