Posts Tagged ‘OLTP’

IBM Introduces New DS8880 All-Flash Arrays

January 13, 2017

Yesterday IBM introduced three new members of the DS8000 line, each an all-flash product.  The new, all-flash storage products are designed for midrange and large enterprises, where high availability, continuous up-time, and performance are critical.

ibm-flash-ds8888-mainframe-ficon

IBM envisions these boxes for more than the z’s core OLTP workloads. According to the company, they are built to provide the speed and reliability needed for workloads ranging from enterprise resource planning (ERP) and financial transactions to cognitive applications like machine learning and natural language processing. The solutions are designed to support cognitive workloads, which can be used to uncover trends and patterns that help improve decision-making, customer service, and ROI. ERP and financial transactions certainly constitute conventional OLTP but the cognitive workloads are more analytical and predictive.

The three products:

  • IBM DS8884 F
  • IBM DS8886 F
  • IBM DS8888 F

The F signifies all-flash.  Each was designed with High-Performance Flash Enclosures Gen2. IBM did not just slap flash into existing hard drive enclosures.  Rather, it reports undertaking a complete redesign of the flash-to-z interaction. As IBM puts it: through deep integration between the flash and the z, IBM has embedded software that facilitates data protection, remote replication, and optimization for midrange and large enterprises. The resulting new microcode is ideal for cognitive workloads on z and Power Systems requiring the highest availability and system reliability possible. IBM promises that the boxes will deliver superior performance and uncompromised availability for business-critical workloads. In short, fast enough to catch bad guys before they leave the cash register or teller window. Specifically:

  • The IBM DS8884 F—labelled as the business class offering–boasts the lowest entry cost for midrange enterprises (prices starting at $90,000 USD). It runs an IBM Power Systems S822, which is a 6-core POWER8 processor per S822 with 256 GB Cache (DRAM), 32 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4 – 154 TB of flash capacity.
  • The IBM DS8886 F—the enterprise class offering for large organizations seeking high performance– sports a 24-core POWER8 processor per S824. It offers 2 TB Cache (DRAM), 128 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4 – 614.4 TB of flash capacity. That’s over one-half petabyte of high performance flash storage.
  • The IBM DS8888 F—labelled an analytics class offering—promises the highest performance for faster insights. It runs on the IBM Power Systems E850 with a 48-core POWER8 processor per E850. It also comes with 2 TB Cache (DRAM), 128 Fibre channel/FICON ports, and 6.4TB – 1.22 PB of flash capacity. Guess crossing the petabyte level qualifies it as an analytics and cognitive device along with the bigger processor complex

As IBM emphasized in the initial briefing, it engineered these storage devices to surpass the typical big flash storage box. For starters, IBM bypassed the device adapter to connect the z directly to the high performance storage controller. IBM’s goal was to reduce latency and optimize all-flash storage, not just navigate a simple replacement by swapping new flash for ordinary flash or, banish the thought, HDD.

“We optimized the data path,” explained Jeff Barber IBM systems VP for HE Storage BLE (DS8, DP&R and SAN). To that end, IBM switched from a 1u to a 4u enclosure, runs on shared-nothing clusters, and boosted throughput performance. The resulting storage, he added, “does database better than anyone; we can run real-time analytics.”  The typical analytics system—a shared system running Hadoop, won’t even come close to these systems, he added. With the DS8888, you can deploy a real-time cognitive cluster with minimal latency flash.

DancingDinosaur always appreciates hearing from actual users. Working through a network of offices, supported by a team of over 850 people, Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia (Zavod za zdravstveno zavarovanje Slovenije), provides health insurance to approximately two million customers. In order to successfully manage its new customer-facing applications (such as electronic ordering processing and electronic receipts) its storage system required additional capacity and performance. After completing research on solutions capable of managing these applications –which included both Hitachi and EMC –the organization deployed the IBM DS8886 along with DB2 for z/OS data server software to provide an integrated data backup and restore system. (Full disclosure: DancingDinosaur has not verified this customer story.)

“As long-time users of IBM storage infrastructure and mainframes, our upgrade to the IBM DS8000 with IBM business partner Comparex was an easy choice. Since then, its high performance and reliability have led us to continually deploy newer DS8000 models as new features and functions have provided us new opportunities,” said Bojan Fele, CIO of Health Insurance Institute of Slovenia. “Our DS8000 implementation has improved our reporting capabilities by reducing time to actionable insights. Furthermore, it has increased employee productivity, ensuring we can better serve our clients.”

For full details and specs on these products, click here

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM z System Shines in 3Q15 Quarterly Report

October 23, 2015

IBM posted another down quarter this past Monday, maybe the thirteenth in a row; it’s easy to lose track. But yet again, the IBM z System provided a bright spot, a 15 percent increase compared with the year-ago period. Last quarter the z also came up a winner. Still the investment analysts went crazy, the stock tumbled, and wild scenarios, inspired by Dell’s acquisition of EMC no doubt, began circulating.

ibm-z13

IBM z13

However, don’t expect IBM to be going away anytime soon. DancingDinosaur is a technology analyst and writer, absolutely not a financial analyst (his wife handles the checkbook).  If you look at what has been going on in the past two years with z System and POWER from a technology standpoint these platforms are here for the long haul.  Most of the top 100 companies rely on a mainframe.  Linux on z has become a factor in roughly 70 percent of the leading shops. When DancingDinosaur last ran the numbers there still are about 5000-6000 active mainframe shops and the numbers aren’t dropping nearly as fast as some pundits would have you believe.

primary-linuxone-emperor

IBM LinuxONE

The z13 and LinuxONE are very powerful mainframes, the most powerful by any number of measures in the industry.  And they are a dramatically different breed of enterprise platform, capable of concurrently running mixed workloads—OLTP, mobile, cloud, analytics—with top performance, scalability, and rock solid security. The Open Mainframe Project in conjunction with the Linux Foundation means that IBM no longer is going it alone with the mainframe. A similar joint effort with the Open POWER Consortium began delivering results within a year.

The Dell-EMC comparison is not a valid one. EMC’s primary business was storage and the business at the enterprise level has changed dramatically. It has changed for IBM too; the company’s revenues from System Storage decreased 19 percent. But storage was never as important to the company as the z, which had long been its cash cow, now diminished for sure but still worth the investment. The dozens and dozens of acquisitions EMC made never brought it much in terms of synergy. IBM, at least, has its strategic imperatives plan that is making measurable progress.

IBM’s strategic imperatives, in fact, were the only business that was doing as well as the z. Strategic imperatives revenue: up 27 percent year-to-year; Cloud revenue up more than 65 percent year-to-date.  Total cloud revenue hit $9.4 billion over the trailing 12 months. Cloud delivered as a service had an annual run rate of $4.5 billion vs. $3.1 billion in third-quarter 2014.  Business analytics revenue was up 19 percent year-to-date. Be interesting to see what cognitive computing and Watson can produce.

Besides storage, the other dim spot in the IBM platform story is Power Systems.  Revenues from Power Systems were down 3 percent compared with the 2014 period. DancingDinosaur, long a fan of Power Systems, anticipates the platform will turn positive next quarter or the first quarter of 2016 as some of the new technology and products coming, in part, from the Open POWER Consortium begin to attract new customers and ring up sales. The new Power Systems LC Server family should attract interest for hybrid Cloud, Hyperscale Data Centers, and Open Solutions, hopefully bringing new customers. With online pricing starting around $6600 the LC machines should be quite competitive against x86 boxes of comparable capabilities.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

New Workloads for the zEnterprise

July 18, 2011

Even before the introduction of the z196 a year ago, IBM had been steadily promoting new mainframe workloads. With the introduction of the zEnterprise, consisting of a z196 and an attached zBX, the hybrid mainframe became real and with it the possibility of running and managing truly new workloads through the z.

Obvious new workloads would be AIX workloads previously running on Power Systems servers, but these aren’t truly new to the organization, only new to the z. The adoption of the Smart Analytics Optimizer, as Florida Hospital plans to do for medical research analytics, is a truly new application for the hospital and for the z.

The introduction of the z114 opens up the potential for new workloads on the z. This would be due mainly to its lower cost, entry pricing starts at $75,000. This lowers the risk of testing new workloads on the z. For example, would an organization now be more willing to try BI against production data residing on the z as a new workload if they could get a discounted price? They could, of course, run BI on a slew of Intel servers for less, but they would give up the proximity of their data and the potential for near real-time BI.

As recently as this past March Marie Wieck, General Manager of IBM Application and Integration Middleware, made the new workloads case in a presentation titled New Workload and New Strategic Thinking for z. In that presentation she identifies five categories of new workloads she deemed strategic. They are:

  1. Business Intelligence (BI) and Analytics
  2. Virtualization and Optimization
  3. Risk Management and Compliance
  4. Business Process Management (BPM)
  5. Cloud computing

None of these, with the possible exception of Cloud, are new workloads. Organizations have been running these workloads for years, just on other platforms. But yes, they certainly are not the traditional System z workloads, which typically revolve around CICS transaction processing, OLTP, and production database management.

DancingDinosaur would like to suggest some areas of other new workloads for the z, especially if you can grab a deeply discounted z114 cheap through the Solution Edition program. And since they are new workloads, they should automatically qualify for the discount program.

The first would be Linux development and testing using a deeply discounted enterprise Linux Solution Edition for the z114. Developers could put up and take down servers at will, runs gads of test data through them, and the machine wouldn’t break a sweat.

Another should be SOA. Enterprise Linux combined with CICS access to production data should be a ripe area for new services-oriented, web-based workloads. You could even pull in smartphones and tablets as access devices.

Finally, there should be much that organizations could do in terms of new workloads using Java, WebSphere, SAP, and even Lotus on the z114. Here too, there will likely need to be Solution Edition discount programs available to reduce costs even more.

And then there are the x blades for the zBX and the imminent arrival of Windows on those x blades. That has the potential to open maybe the largest set yet of new workloads for the z.

The big obstacle to new workloads on the z is that these workloads already are running in some form on other platforms in the organization. So, what the z gains, the other platforms and the teams that support them lose. That’s a difficult political battle to fight, and the best way to win is to offer an unbeatable z business case. Even with the z114, IBM isn’t there yet.

To get there, IBM has to add the last piece missing from the new workloads picture painted above—a System z Solution Edition discount program that also includes a deeply discounted zBX. That could prove irresistible to organizations otherwise contemplating new system z workloads.


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