Posts Tagged ‘Open Power Foundation’

IBM Gets Serious About Open Data Science (ODS) with Anaconda

April 21, 2017

As IBM rapidly ramps up cognitive systems in various forms, its two remaining platforms, z System and POWER, get more and more interesting. This week IBM announced it was bringing the Anaconda Open Data Science (ODS) platform to its Cognitive Systems and PowerAI.

Anaconda, Courtesy Pinterest

Specifically, Anaconda will integrate with the PowerAI software distribution for machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL). The goal: make it simple and fast to take advantage of Power performance and GPU optimization for data-intensive cognitive workloads.

“Anaconda on IBM Cognitive Systems empowers developers and data scientists to build and deploy deep learning applications that are ready to scale,” said Bob Picciano, senior vice president of IBM Cognitive Systems. Added Travis Oliphant, co-founder and chief data scientist, Continuum Analytics, which introduced the Anaconda platform: “By optimizing Anaconda on Power, developers will also gain access to the libraries in the PowerAI Platform for exploration and deployment in Anaconda Enterprise.”

With more than 16 million downloads to date, Anaconda has emerged as the Open Data Science platform leader. It is empowering leading businesses across industries worldwide with tools to identify patterns in data, uncover key insights, and transform basic data into the intelligence required to solve the world’s most challenging problems.

As one of the fastest growing fields of AI, DL makes it possible to process enormous datasets with millions or even billions of elements and extract useful predictive models. DL is transforming the businesses of leading consumer Web and mobile application companies, and it is catching on with more traditional business.

IBM developed PowerAI to accelerate enterprise adoption of open-source ML and DL frameworks used to build cognitive applications. PowerAI promises to reduce the complexity and risk of deploying these open source frameworks for enterprises on the Power architecture and is tuned for high performance, according to IBM. With PowerAI, organizations also can realize the benefit of enterprise support on IBM Cognitive Systems HPC platforms used in the most demanding commercial, academic, and hyperscale environments

For POWER shops getting into Anaconda, which is based on Python, is straightforward. You need a Power8 with IBM GPU hardware or a Power8 combined with a Nvidia GPU, in effect a Minsky machine. It’s essentially a developer’s tool although ODS proponents see it more broadly, bridging the gap between traditional IT and lines of business, shifting traditional roles, and creating new roles. In short, they envision scientists, mathematicians, engineers, business people, and more getting involved in ODS.

The technology is designed to run on the user’s desktop but is packaged and priced as a cloud subscription with a base package of 20 users. User licenses range from $500 per year to $30,000 per year depending on which bells and whistles you include. The number of options is pretty extensive.

According to IBM, this started with PowerAI to accelerate enterprise adoption of open-source ML/DL learning frameworks used to build cognitive applications. Overall, the open Anaconda platform brings capabilities for large-scale data processing, predictive analytics, and scientific computing to simplify package management and deployment. Developers using open source ML/DL components can use Power as the deployment platform and take advantage of Power optimization and GPU differentiation for NVIDIA.

Not to be left out, IBM noted growing support for the OpenPOWER Foundation, which recently announced the OpenPOWER Machine Learning Work Group (OPMLWG). The new OPMLWG includes members like Google, NVIDIA and Mellanox to provide a forum for collaboration that will help define frameworks for the productive development and deployment of ML solutions using OpenPOWER ecosystem technology. The foundation has also surpassed 300-members, with new participants such as Kinetica, Red Hat, and Toshiba. For traditional enterprise data centers, the future increasingly is pointing toward cognitive in one form or another.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM zSystem and Power Score in IDC 4Q 2015 Rankings

March 18, 2016

IBM retained the number 3 spot with 14.1% share for the quarter as revenue increased 8.9% year-over-year to $2.2 billion in 4Q15. More impressively, IBM experienced strong growth for POWER Systems and double-digit growth for its z System mainframes in the quarter, according to IDC. You can check out the IDC announcement here. IDC credits z and POWER for IBM’s strong platform finish in 2015.

Primary_LinuxONE_LeftAngle-1 (1) zSystem-based LinuxONE

DancingDinosaur has expected these results and been reporting IBM’s z System and POWER System successes for the past year. You can check it out here (z13s) and here (LinuxOne) and here (Power Systems LC).

Along with deservedly crowing about its latest IDC ranking IBM added:  z Systems saw double digit growth due to a number of new portfolio enhancements. The next-generation z13 mainframe, optimized for digital businesses and hybrid cloud environments, is designed to handle mobile transactions securely and at scale, while enabling clients to run analytics on the system and in real time. IBM expanded its commitment to offering open-source on the mainframe by launching a line of Linux-only systems in August of 2015. LinuxONE is based on the latest generation of z Systems technology and enables popular open-source tools and software on the mainframe. IBM also added what amounts to a Business Class z with the z13s to go along with a Business Class dedicated Linux z, the LinuxONE Rockhopper.

Meanwhile, IBM has started to get some uptake for its Open Mainframe Project. In addition to announcing support from the usual mainframe suspects—IBM, CA, Compuware, SUSE, BMC, and others—it also announced its first projects. These include an effort to find ways to leverage new software and tools in the Linux environment that can better take advantage of the mainframe’s speed, security, scalability, and availability. DancingDinosaur is hoping that in time the Open Mainframe Project will produce the kind of results the Open POWER Foundation has recently generated for the POWER Platform

IBM attributes the growing traction of Linux running on POWER Systems in large part to optimized solutions such as DB2 BLU, SAP HANA, and other industry big data software, built on POWER Systems running Linux. In October 2015, IBM expanded its Linux on Power Systems portfolio with the LC line of servers. These servers are infused with OpenPOWER Foundation technology and bring the higher performance of the POWER CPU to the broad Linux community. The POWER-based LC line along with the z-based LinuxONE Rockhopper should give any data center manager looking to run a large, efficient Linux server farm a highly cost-competitive option that can rival or even beat the x86 option. And given that both platforms will handle Docker containers and microservices and support all of today’s popular development tools there is no reason to stick with x86.

From a platform standpoint, IBM appears to be in sync with what IDC is reporting: Datacenter buildout continues, and the main beneficiary this quarter is the density-optimized segment of the market, where growth easily outpaced the overall server market. Density-optimized servers achieved a 30.2% revenue growth rate this quarter, contributing a full 2 percentage points to the overall 5.2% revenue growth in the market.

“The fourth quarter (of 2015) was a solid close to a strong year of growth in the server market, driven by on premise refresh deployments as well as continued hyperscale cloud deployments,” said Kuba Stolarski, Research Director, Servers and Emerging Technologies at IDC. “As the cyclical refresh of 2015 comes to an end, the market focus has begun to shift towards software-defined infrastructure and hybrid environment management, as organizations begin to transform their IT infrastructure as well as prepare for the compute demands expected over the next few years from next-gen IT domains such as IoT and cognitive analytics. In the short term, 2016 looks to be a year of accelerated cloud infrastructure expansion with existing footprints filling out and new cloud datacenter buildouts across the globe.”

After a seemingly endless string of dismal quarters DancingDinosaur is encouraged by what IBM is doing now with the z, POWER Systems, and its strategic initiatives. With its strategic focus on cloud, mobile, big data analytics, cognitive computing, and IoT as well as its support for the latest approaches to software development, tools, and languages, IBM should be well positioned to continue its platform success in 2016.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM zSystem Continues Surge in 4Q15

January 22, 2016

DancingDinosaur follows technology, not financial investments, so you’d be an idiot if you considered what follows as investment advice. It is not.  Still, as one who has built a chunk of his career around the mainframe, it is good to see the z System continuing to remain in the black and beating the sexier Power lineup although I do follow both closely. See the latest IBM financials here.

  ibm-z13

The IBM z13 System

 Specifically, as IBM reported on Tuesday, revenues from z Systems mainframe server products increased 16 percent compared with the year-ago period (up 21 percent adjusting for currency).  Total delivery of z Systems computing power, as measured in MIPS (millions of instructions per second), increased 28 percent.  Revenues from Power Systems were up 4 percent compared with the 2014 period (up 8 percent adjusting for currency).

Almost as good, revenues from Power Systems were up 4 percent compared with the 2014 period (up 8 percent adjusting for currency). Power revenues have been up most of the year although they got a little blurry in the accounting.

In the storage market, which is getting battered by software defined storage (SDS) on one hand and cloud-based storage on the other, IBM reported revenues from System Storage decreased 11 percent (down 7 percent adjusting for currency). The storage revenues probably won’t bounce back fast, at least not without IBM bringing out radically new storage products. That storage rival EMC got acquired by Dell should be some kind of signal that the storage market as the traditional enterprise players knew it is drastically different. For now object storage, SDS, and even Flash won’t replace the kind of revenue IBM used to see from DS8000 disk systems or TS enterprise tape libraries loaded with mechanical robotics.

Getting more prominence is IBM’s strategic initiative. This has been a company priority all year. Strategic initiatives include cloud, mobile, analytics, security, IoT, and cognitive computing. Q4 revenues, as reported by IBM, from these strategic imperatives — cloud, analytics, and engagement — increased 10 percent year-to-year (up 16 percent adjusting for currency).  For the full year, revenues from strategic imperatives increased 17 percent (up 26 percent adjusting for currency and the divested System x business) to $28.9 billion and now represents 35 percent of total IBM consolidated revenue.

For the full year, total cloud revenues (public, private and hybrid) increased 43 percent (up 57 percent adjusting for currency and the divested System x business) to $10.2 billion.  Revenues for cloud delivered as a service — a subset of the total cloud revenue — increased 50 percent to $4.5 billion; and the annual as-a-service run rate increased to $5.3 billion from $3.5 billion in the fourth quarter of 2014.

Meanwhile, revenues from business analytics increased 7 percent (up 16 percent adjusting for currency) to $17.9 billion.  Revenues from mobile more than tripled and from security increased 5 percent (up 12 percent adjusting for currency).

Commenting on IBM latest financial was Timothy Prickett Morgan, who frequently writes on IBM’s platforms. Citing Martin Schroeter, IBM’s chief financial officer, statements to analyst, Morgan suggested that low profit margins, which other financial analysts complained about, put pressure on the System z13 product line that launched early in the year. After a fast start, apparently, the z13 is now experiencing a slowdown in the upgrade cycle. It’s at this point that DancingDinosaur usually expects to see a new z, typically a business class version of the latest mainframe, the z13 in this case, but that does not appear to be in the offing. About the closest IBM got to that was the RockHopper model of the LinuxOne, a z optimized only for Linux, cloud, mobile, and analytics.

Morgan also noted that IBM added about 50 new mainframe customers for the year on an installed base of about 6,000 active customers. DancingDinosaur has been tracking that figure for years and it has not fluctuated much in recent years. And am never sure how to count the handful of IT shops that run a z in the IBM cloud.  But 5000-6000 active z shops still sounds about right.

Power Systems, which has also grown four quarters in a row, and was up 8 percent at constant currency. This has to be a relief to the company, which has committed over $1 billion to Power. IBM attributes some of this growth to its enthusiastic embrace of Linux on Power8, but Morgan complains of having no sense of how much of the Power Systems pie is driven by scale-out Linux machines intended to compete against Intel Xeon servers. Power also is starting to get some boost from the OpenPOWER Foundation, members that started to ship products in the past few months. It’s probably minimal revenue now but over time it should grow.

For those of us who are counting on z and Power to be around for a while longer, the latest financials should be encouraging.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Ranked #1 in Midrange Servers and Enterprise Network Storage

August 13, 2015

Although the financial markets may be beating up IBM the technology world continues to acclaim IBM technology and products. Most recently, IBM ranked on top in the CRN Annual Report Card (ARC) Survey recognizing the best-in-class vendors in the categories of partnership, support, and product innovation.  But the accolades don’t stop there.

Mobile Security Infographic

Courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

IBM was named a leader in four key cloud services categories—hosting, overall cloud professional services, cloud consulting services, and systems integration—by the independent technology market research firm Technology Business Research, Inc. (TBR).  This summer Gartner also named IBM as a leader in Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) in the latest Gartner Magic Quadrant for SIEM, this for the seventh consecutive year. Gartner also named IBM as a Leader in the 2015 Magic Quadrant for Mobile Application Development Platforms, specifically calling out the IBM MobileFirst Platform.

The CRN award addresses the technology channel. According to IBM, the company and its business partners are engaging with clients in new ways to work, building the infrastructure, and deploying innovative solutions for the digital era.  This should come as no surprise to anyone reading this blog; the z 13 was designed expressly to be a digital platform for the cloud, mobile, and big data era.  IBM’s z and Power Systems servers and Storage Solutions specifically were designed to address the challenges these areas present.

Along the same lines, IBM’s commitment to open alliances has continued this year unabated, starting with its focus on innovation platforms designed for big data and superior cloud economics, which continue to be the cornerstone of IBM Power System. The company also plays a leading role in the Open Power Foundation, the Linux Foundation as well as ramping up communities around the Internet of Things, developerWorks Recipes, and the open cloud, developerWorks Open. The last two were topics DancingDinosaur tackled recently, here and here.

The TBR report, entitled Hosted Private & Professional Services Cloud Benchmark, provides a market synopsis and growth estimates for 29 cloud providers in the first quarter of 2015. In that report, TBR cited IBM as:

  • The undisputed growth leader in overall professional cloud services
  • The leader in hosted private cloud and managed cloud services
  • A leader in OpenStack vendor acquisitions and OpenStack cloud initiatives
  • A growth leader in cloud consulting services, bridging the gap between technology and strategy consulting
  • A growth leader in cloud systems integration services

According to the report: IBM’s leading position across all categories remains unchallenged as the company’s established SoftLayer and Bluemix portfolios, coupled with in-house cloud and solutions integration expertise, provide enterprises with end-to-end solutions.

Wall Street analysts and pundits clearly look at IBM differently than IT analysts.  The folks who look at IBM’s technology, strategy, and services, like those at Gartner, TBR, and the CRN report card, tell a different story. Who do you think has it right?

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

z Systems and Cloud Lead IBM 2Q Results

July 24, 2015

DancingDinosaur generally steers clear of writing about reported quarterly revenue. Given the general focus of this blog on enterprise and cloud computing, however, IBM’s recent 2Q15 report can’t be ignored. Although it continued IBM’s recent string of negative quarterly results, the z and cloud proved to be bright spots.

Infographic - IBM Q2 2015 Earnings - Cloud - July 20 2015 - Final

Strong IBM cloud performance, Q2 2015 (click to enlarge)

As IBM reported on Monday: Revenues from z Systems mainframe server products increased 9 percent compared with the year-ago period (up 15 percent adjusting for currency).  Total delivery of z Systems computing power, as measured in MIPS, increased 24 percent.  Revenues from Power Systems were down 1 percent compared with the 2014 period (up 5 percent adjusting for currency).

It’s not clear when and how Power Systems will come back. IBM has opened up the Power platform through the Open Power Foundation. A good move in theory, which DancingDinosaur applauds. Still, much depends on the Foundation gaining increased momentum and individual members rolling out successful Power-based products. The roadmap for POWER8, POWER9, and beyond looks promising but how fast products will arrive is unclear. There also is potential for the commoditization of the Power platform, a welcome development in many quarters, but commoditization’s impact on future revenue also is not clear.

Cloud revenue was up more than 70 percent, adjusting for currency and divested businesses; up more than 50 percent as reported, according to IBM. Given that cloud, along with mobile and analytics, has been designated strategic by IBM this is an encouraging development. The company’s cloud strategy is starting to bear fruit.

The big question hanging over every vendor’s cloud strategy is how to make money at it. One of the appealing aspects of the cloud in terms of cost and pricing for IT-using organizations is what amounts to a race to the bottom. With pricing immediately apparent and lower pricing just a click away it has become a feast for the bottom grazers to whom the lowest price is all that matters. For companies like IBM and Oracle, which also has declared cloud a strategic initiative, and other large legacy enterprise platform providers the challenge is to be competitive on price while differentiating their offerings in other ways. Clearly IBM has some unique cloud offerings in Watson and Bluemix and others but can they deliver enough revenue fast enough to offset the reduction in legacy platform revenue. Remember, x86 is off IBM’s menu.

Timothy Prickett Morgan, who writes frequently about IBM technology, also had plenty to say about IBM’s 2Q15 announcement, as did a zillion other financial and industry analyst. To begin he noted the irony of IBM promoting cloud computing, primarily an x86 phenomenon while trying to convince people that Power-based systems are cost competitive—which they can be—and will do a better job for many of those workloads, correct again.

Morgan also makes an interesting point in regard to the z: “IBM doesn’t have to push the System z mainframe so much as keep it on a Moore’s Law curve of its own and keep the price/performance improving to keep those customers in the mainframe fold.” That’s harder than it may seem; DancingDinosaur addressed the Moore’ Law issue last week here. As Morgan notes, with well over $1 trillion in software assets running on the mainframe, the 6,000 or so enterprises that use mainframes are unlikely to move off the platform because of the cost, disruption, and risk such a move would entail. Just ask Union-Pacific Railroad, which seems to be doing a slow-motion platform migration off the mainframe that seemingly may never actually end. Morgan concludes: “IBM can count on a certain level of money from the System z line that it just cannot with the Power Systems line.”

As noted above, how much revenue Power can generate for IBM depends on how fast the Open Power Foundation members introduce products that expand the market and how many Power processors SoftLayer can absorb as the business unit expands its global footprint.  There also is the question of how many POWER8 servers Rackspace, a much larger cloud provider than SoftLayer, will take and whether the Rackspace initiative will catch on elsewhere.

In any event, IBM’s 2Q15 report showed enough positive momentum to encourage IT platform enthusiasts. For its part, DancingDinosaur is expecting a business class z13 in the coming months and more.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Continues Open Source Commitment with Apache Spark

June 18, 2015

If anyone believes IBM’s commitment to open source is a passing fad, forget it. IBM has invested billions in Linux, open Power through the Open Power Foundation, and more. Its latest is the announcement of a major commitment to Apache Spark, a fast open source and general cluster computing system for big data.

spark VGN8668

Courtesy of IBM: developers work with Spark at Galvanize Hackathon

As IBM sees it, Spark brings essential advances to large-scale data processing. Specifically, it dramatically improves the performance of data dependent-apps and is expected to play a big role in the Internet of Things (IoT). In addition, it radically simplifies the process of developing intelligent apps, which are fueled by data. It does so by providing high-level APIs in Scala, Java, and Python, and an optimized engine that supports general computation graphs for data analysis. It also supports a rich set of higher-level tools including Spark SQL for SQL and DataFrames, MLlib for machine learning, GraphX for graph processing, and Spark Streaming for stream processing.

IBM is contributing its breakthrough IBM SystemML machine learning technology to the Spark open source ecosystem. Spark brings essential advances to large-scale data processing, such as improvements in the performance of data dependent apps. It also radically simplifies the process of developing intelligent apps, which are fueled by data. But maybe the biggest advantage is that it can handle data coming from multiple, disparate sources.

What IBM likes in Spark is that it’s agile, fast, and easy to use. It also likes it being open source, which ensures it is improved continuously by a worldwide community. That’s also some of the main reasons mainframe and Power Systems data centers should pay attention to Spark.  Spark will make it easier to connect applications to data residing in your data center. If you haven’t yet noticed an uptick in mobile transactions coming into your data center, they will be coming. These benefit from Spark. And if you look out just a year or two, expect to see IoT applications adding to and needing to combine all sorts of data, much of it ending up on the mainframe or Power System in one form or another. So make sure Spark is on your radar screen.

Over the course of the next few months, IBM scientists and engineers will work with the Apache Spark open community to accelerate access to advanced machine learning capabilities and help drive speed-to-innovation in the development of smart business apps. By contributing SystemML, IBM hopes data scientists iterate faster to address the changing needs of business and to enable a growing ecosystem of app developers who will apply deep intelligence to everything.

To ensure that happens, IBM will commit more than 3,500 researchers and developers to work on Spark-related projects at more than a dozen labs worldwide, and open a Spark Technology Center in San Francisco for the Data Science and Developer community to foster design-led innovation in intelligent applications. IBM also aims to educate more than 1 million data scientists and data engineers on Spark through extensive partnerships with AMPLab, DataCamp, MetiStream, Galvanize, and Big Data University MOOC (Massive Open Online Course).

Of course, Spark isn’t going to be the end of tools to expedite the latest app dev. With IoT just beginning to gain widespread interest expect a flood of tools to expedite developing IoT data-intensive applications and more tools to facilitate connecting all these coming connected devices, estimated to number in the tens of billions within a few years.

DancingDinosaur applauds IBM’s decade-plus commitment to open source and its willingness to put real money and real code behind it. That means the IBM z System mainframe, the POWER platform, Linux, and the rest will be around for some time. That’s good; DancingDinosaur is not quite ready to retire.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.


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