Posts Tagged ‘ransomeware’

High Cost of Ignoring Z’s Pervasive Encryption

May 17, 2018

That cost was spelled out at IBM’s Think this past spring.  Writes David Bruce, who leads IBM’s strategies for security on IBM Z and LinuxONE, data breaches are expensive, costing $3.6 million on average. And hoping to avoid one by doing business as usual is a bad bet. Bruce reports breaches are increasingly likely: an organization has a 28 percent chance of being breached in the next 24 months. You can find Bruce’s comments on security and pervasive encryption here.

9 million data records were compromised in 2015

Were any of those 9 million records from your organization? Did you end up on the front page of the newspaper? To stay out of the data breach headlines, organizations require security solutions that protect enterprise and customer data at minimal cost and effort, Bruce observes.

Encryption is the preferred solution, but it is costly, cumbersome, labor-intensive, and hit-or-miss. It is hit-or-miss because the overhead involved forces organizations to choose what to encrypt and what to skip. You have to painstakingly classify the data in terms of risk, which takes time and only adds to the costs. Outside of critical revenue transactions or key intellectual property—no brainers—you will invariably choose wrong and miss something you will regret when it shows up on the front page of the New York Times.

Adding to the cost is the compliance runaround. Auditors are scheduled to visit or maybe they aren’t even scheduled and just drop in; you now have to drop whatever your staff was hoping to do and gather the necessary documentation to prove your data is safe and secure.  Do you really need this? Life is too short as it is.

You really want to put an end to the entire security compliance runaround and all the headaches it entails. But more than that, you want protected, secure data; all data, all the time.  When someone from a ransomware operation calls asking for hundreds or thousands of dollars to get your data back you can laugh and hang up the phone. That’s what Bruce means when he talks about pervasive encryption. All your data is safely encrypted with its keys protected from the moment it is created until the moment it is destroyed by you. And you don’t have to lift a finger; the Z does it all.

That embarrassing news item about a data breach; it won’t happen to you either. Most importantly of all, customers will never see it and get upset.

In fact, at Think, Forrester discussed today’s customer-obsessed approach that leading organizations are adopting to spur growth. To obsess over customers, explained Bruce, means to take great care in protecting the customer’s sensitive data, which provides the cornerstone of a customer-obsessed Forrester zero trust security framework. The framework includes, among other security elements, encryption of all data across the enterprise. Enabling the Z’s built in pervasive encryption and automatic key protection you can ignore the rest of Forrester’s framework.

Pervasive encryption, unique to Z, addresses the security challenges while helping you thrive in this age of the customer. At Think, Michael Jordan, IBM Distinguished Engineer for IBM Z Security, detailed how pervasive encryption represents a paradigm shift in security, reported Bruce. Previously, selective field-level encryption was the only feasible way to secure data, but it was time-, cost-, and resource-intensive – and it left large portions of data unsecured.

Pervasive encryption, however, offers a solution capable of encrypting data in bulk, making it possible and practical to encrypt all data associated with an application, database, and cloud service – whether on premises or in the cloud, at-rest or in-flight. This approach also simplifies compliance by eliminating the need to demonstrate compliance at the field level. Multiple layers of encryption – from disk and tape up through applications – provide the strongest possible defense against security breaches. The high levels of security enabled by pervasive encryption help you promote customer confidence by protecting their data and privacy.

If you have a Z and have not enabled pervasive encryption, you are putting your customers and your organization at risk. Am curious, please drop me a note why.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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