Posts Tagged ‘RESTful API’

IBM Launches New IoT Collaborative Initiative

February 23, 2017

Collaboration partners can pull hundreds of millions of dollars in new revenue from IoT, according to IBM’s recent IoT announcement. Having reached what it describes as a tipping point with IoT innovation the company now boasts of having over 6,000 clients and partners around the world, many of whom are now wanting to join in its new global Watson IoT center to co-innovate. Already Avnet, BNP Paribas, Capgemini, and Tech Mahindra will collocate development teams at the IBM Munich center to work on IoT collaborations.

new-ibm-watson-iot-center

IBM Opens New Global Center for Watson IoT

The IBM center also will act as an innovation space for the European IoT standards organization EEBus.  The plan, according to Harriet Green, General Manager, IBM Watson IoT, Cognitive Engagement and Education (pictured above left), calls for building a new global IoT innovation ecosystem that will explore how cognitive and IoT technologies will transform industries and our daily lives.

IoT and more recently cognitive are naturals for the z System, and POWER Systems have been the platform for natural language processing and cognitive since Watson won Jeopardy three years ago. With the latest enhancements IBM has brought to the z in the form of on-premises cognitive and machine learning the z should assume an important role as it gathers, stores, collects, and processes IoT data for cognitive analysis. DancingDinosaur first reported on this late in 2014 and again just last week. As IoT and cognitive workloads ramp up on z don’t be surprised to see monthly workload charges rise.

Late last year IBM announced that car maker BMW will collocate part of its research and development operations at IBM’s new Watson IoT center to help reimagine the driving experience. Now, IBM is announcing four more companies that have signed up to join its special industry “collaboratories” where clients and partners work together with 1,000 Munich-based IBM IoT experts to tap into the latest design thinking and push the boundaries of the possible with IoT.

Let’s look at the four newest participants starting with Avnet. According to IBM, an IT distributor and global IBM partner, Avnet will open a new joint IoT Lab within IBM’s Watson IoT HQ to develop, build, demonstrate and sell IoT solutions powered by IBM Watson. Working closely with IBM’s leading technologists and IoT experts, Avnet also plans to enhance its IoT technical expertise through hands-on training and on-the-job learning. Avnet’s team of IoT and analytics experts will also partner with IBM on joint business development opportunities across multiple industries including smart buildings, smart homes, industry, transportation, medical, and consumer.

As reported by BNP Paribas, Consorsbank, its retail digital bank in Germany, will partner with IBM´s new Watson IoT Center. The company will collocate a team of solution architects, developers and business development personnel at the Watson facility. Together with IBM’s experts, they will explore how IoT and cognitive technologies can drive transformation in the banking industry and help innovate new financial products and services, such as investment advice.

Similarly, global IT consulting and technology services provider Capgemini will collocate a team of cognitive IoT experts at the Watson center. Together they will help customers maximize the potential of Industry 4.0 and develop and take to market sector-specific cognitive IoT solutions. Capgemini plans a close link between its Munich Applied Innovation Exchange and IBM’s new Customer Experience zones to collaborate with clients in an interactive environment.

Finally, the Indian multinational provider of enterprise and communications IT and networking technology Tech Mahindra, is one of IBM’s Global System Integrators with over 3,000 specialists focused on IBM technology around the world. The company will locate a team of six developers and engineers within the Watson IoT HQ to help deliver on Tech Mahindra’s vision of generating substantial new revenue based on IBM’s Watson IoT platform. Tech Mahindra will use the center to co-create and showcase new solutions based on IBM’s Watson IoT platform for Industry 4.0 and Manufacturing, Precision Farming, Healthcare, Insurance and Banking, and automotive.

To facilitate connecting the z to IoT IBM offers a simple recipe. It requires 4 basic ingredients and 4 steps: Texas Instrument’s SensorTag, a Bluemix account, IBM z/OS Connect Enterprise Edition, and a back-end service like CICS.  Start by exposing an existing z Systems application as a RESTful AP. This is where the z/OS Connect Edition comes in.  Then enable your SensorTag device to Watson IoT Quick Start. From there connect the Cloud to your on-premises Hybrid Cloud.  Finally, enable the published IoT data to trigger a RESTful API. Sounds pretty straightforward but—full disclosure—Dancing Dinosaur has not tried it due to lacking the necessary pieces. If you try it, please tell DancingDinosaur how it works (info@radding.net). Good luck.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM’s Strategic Initiatives Gain New All-Flash Storage

May 6, 2016

Flash storage must be the latest rage among enterprise storage vendors.  Last week IBM introduced three new all-flash storage arrays, driving down latency and price/gigabyte to unheard of levels (minimum latency of 250μs, all-flash storage as low as $1.50 per gigabyte). Earlier this week EMC announced new all-flash arrays for its Unity series at prices under $18,000 (under $10,000 for hybrid arrays.) Flash storage has long beaten hard disk in terms of cost per IOPS, but now it is rivaling hard disk in terms of cost/gigabyte.

IBM_Flash_2015_1259-C-no_shadow_A9000GlamShot2

IBM A9000 All-Flash Array

OK, it looks a little—uh—boxy to say the least. But the new FlashSystem A9000 is packed with storage goodies. It comes fully configured, which helps drive down the cost of implementing an all-flash environment. Its sister, the FlashSystem A9000R, brings a grid architecture that provides for easy scaling up to the petabyte range. Both FlashSystems incorporate data reduction features, including pattern removal, deduplication and real-time compression, as well as IBM FlashCore technology to deliver consistent low latency performance. As noted above, they are priced as low as $1.50 per gigabyte.

Driving IBM’s latest interest in flash storage are its strategic initiatives, start with cloud computing. Consumers today, notes IBM, are demanding cloud-based applications that are fast, easy, and intelligent. That means minimal latency. Cloud users are demanding sub-second response times, especially when accessing critical data. They also are demanding cloud providers deliver a unique, personalized, and positive customer experience.

To deliver this, IBM is turning to hardware innovation, specifically its MicroLatency technology, to transfers data within the flash array instead of adding another layer of software. MicroLatency technology inserts FPGAs (hardware) that connects and communicates directly with the flash and RAID controllers, eliminating the latency of software and even firmware. Instead, the FlashSystems lets hardware talk directly with hardware.

In addition, IBM is packing the new FlashSystem arrays with features designed to solve cloud requirements such as quality-of-service (QoS) to prevent the noisy neighbor problems with application performance. The new arrays also feature secure multi-tenancy, thresholding, and easy-to-deploy grid scale-out capabilities.

The z System platform is not being ignored in all of this. IBM is including a new DS model, the all-flash IBM DS 8888 optimized for enterprise-class servers: With the all-flash IBM DS8888, customer databases and data-intensive applications are accelerated, resulting in improved business performance and customer satisfaction.

Specifically, the DS888 brings faster decision making and improve customer serviceability, with 4x performance over previous generations and accelerated response time for mission critical applications. The flash storage delivers up to 2.5 million IOPS, the result of having been built on the Power8 processor. It also enables organizations to streamline operations through the performance of an all flash architected solution aligned to provide the deepest integration with System z environments. For instance, IBM promises the most robust FICON connectivity through an architecture optimized for mainframe’s 4K cache segments.

In addition, the DS8888 promises 24×7 access to data and applications through superior business continuity on high demand transaction processing workloads while delivering top operations performance through its all flash architecture. It goes beyond the usual high end 5-nines availability to deliver 6-nines availability, which translates into a mere 2.59 seconds of downtime per month.  Other availability features include flexible replication (IBM FlashCopy, Metro Mirror, Global Mirror, Metro/Global Mirror, Global Copy & Multiple Target Peer-to-Peer Remote Copy). In the early years of flash reliability and availability were a concern.  With the DS8888 and 6-nines availability it isn’t any more.

Finally, it comes with a smorgasbord of security and efficiency goodies, including self-encrypted flash drives, key interoperability management protocol, syslog protocol, an intuitive GUI (IBM has learned a few tricks from Apple), innovative storage software licensing, RESTful and OpenStack APIs to connect workloads between private and public clouds, and thin provisioning for maximum utilization and reclamation of capacity from deleted data.

All-flash solutions announced last week complement IBM’s existing all-flash portfolio including FlashSystem 900 and V9000 that also leverage IBM’s FlashCore technology. IBM’s midrange all-flash solutions consist of all-flash versions of IBM’s Storwize family, which offers the performance needed for real-time insights from business data combined with advanced management functions. IBM’s Big Data all-flash solution delivers high-density multi-petabyte scale and a low-cost flash option ideal for industries such as media, genomics, and life sciences.

DancingDinosaur used to be hired to write papers around the enterprise cost-performance tradeoffs between hard disk and SSD/flash. No matter how expensive flash was at whatever point, the cost per IOPS always favored flash and cost per gigabytes always favored hard disk. That’s no longer an analysis worth even making today.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

 

Open KVM Adds Kimchi to Speed Ramp Up

November 15, 2013

The Linux Foundation, the group trying to drive the growth of Linux and collaborative development recently brought the Open Virtualization Alliance (OVA) under its umbrella as a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.  The change should help KVM take better advantage of the marketing and administrative capabilities of the Linux Foundation and enable tighter affinity with the Linux community at large.

The immediate upshot of the Oct. 21 announcement was increased exposure for open KVM.  Over 150 media stories appeared, Facebook hits jumped 33%, and the OVA website saw a big surge of traffic, 82% of which from first time visitors. First up on the agenda should be tapping the expansive ecosystem of the Linux Foundation in service of Kimchi, OVA’s new easy to deploy and use administrative tool for KVM.  Mike Day, an IBM Distinguished Engineer and Chief Virtualization Architect for Open Systems Development described Kimchi as the “fastest on-ramp to using KVM.

Kimchi is about as lightweight as a management tool can get. It offers stateless installation (no server), brings a graphical and mobile interface, and comes bundled with KVM for Power but does not require HMC, IBM’s primary tool for planning, deploying, and managing IBM Power System servers. It also is based on open, standard components, including the RESTful API, and it is part of the OpenStack community.

What Kimchi does is to provide a mobile- and Windows-friendly virtualization manager for KVM. It delivers point-to-point management, thereby avoiding the need to invest in yet more management server hardware, training, or installation. Promised to be simple to use, it was designed to appeal to a VMware administrator.

So what can you actually do with Kimchi? At the moment only the basics.  You can use it to manage all KVM guests, although it does has special support for some Linux guests at this point. Also, you can use it without Linux skills.

To figure out the path going forward the OVA and Linux Foundation are really seeking community participation and feedback.  Some of the Kimchi options coming under consideration first:

  • Federation versus export to OpenStack
  • Further storage and networking configurations; how advanced does it need to get?
  • Automation and tuning – how far should it go?
  • RESTful API development and usage
  • Addition of knobs and dials or keep sparse

Today Kimchi supports most basic networking and configurations.  There is yet no VLAN or clustering with Kimchi.

Kimchi is poised to fulfill a central position in the KVM environment—able to speed adoption.  What is most needed, however, is an active ecosystem of developers who can build out this sparse but elegant open source tool. To do that, IBM will need to give some attention to Kimchi to make sure it doesn’t get overlooked or lost in the slew of its sister open source initiatives like OpenStack, Linux itself, and even Eclipse. OpenStack, it appears, will be most critical, and it is a good sign that it already is at the top of the Kimchi to-do list.

And speaking of IBM opening up development, in an announcement earlier this week IBM said it will make its IBM Watson technology available as a development platform in the cloud to enable a worldwide community of software application providers who might build a new generation of apps infused with Watson’s cognitive computing intelligence.  Watson badly needed this; until now Watson has been an impressive toy for a very small club.

The move, according to IBM, aims to spur innovation and fuel a new ecosystem of entrepreneurial software application providers – ranging from start-ups and emerging, venture capital backed businesses to established players. To make this work IBM will be launching the IBM Watson Developers Cloud, a cloud-hosted marketplace where application providers of all sizes and industries will be able to tap into resources for developing Watson-powered apps. This will include a developer toolkit, educational materials, and access to Watson’s application programming interface (API). And they should do the same with Kimchi.


%d bloggers like this: