Posts Tagged ‘social business’

IBM zSystem for Social—Far From Forgotten at Edge2015

May 28, 2015

Dexter Doyle and Chris Gamin (z System Middleware) titled their session at Edge2015 IBM z Systems: The Forgotten Platform in Your Social Business. They were only half joking. As systems of engagement play bigger roles in the enterprise the z is not quite as forgotten as it may once have been.  In fact, at IBM the z runs the company’s own deployment of IBM Connections, the company’s flagship social business product.

Doyle used the graphic below (copyright John Atkinson, Wrong Hands) to make the point that new tools replace familiar conventional tools in a social business world.

 social desktop

 (copyright John Atkinson, Wrong Hands, click to enlarge)

Looks almost familiar, huh? Social business is not so radical. The elements of social business have been with us all along. It’s not exactly a one-to-one mapping, but Twitter and Pinterest instead of post-it notes, LinkedIn replaces the rolodex, Instagram instead of photos on your desk, and more.  Social business done right with the appropriate tools enables efficiency, Doyle observed. You don’t see the z in this picture, but it is there connecting all the dots in the social sphere

Many traditional mainframe data centers are struggling to come to grips with social business even as mobile and social workloads increasingly flow through the z. “The biggest thing with social is the change in culture,” said Doyle in his Forgotten Platform session. You end up using different tools to do business in a more social way. Even email appears antiquated in social business.

For data centers still balking at the notion of social business, Doyle noted that by 2016, 50% of large organizations will have internal Facebook-like social networks, a widely reported Gartner finding, and 30% of these will be considered as essential as email and telephones are today. The message: social business is real and z data centers should be a big part of it.

So what parts of social business will engage with the z? Doyle suggested five to start:

  1. Social media analytics
  2. Customer sentiment
  3. Customer and new market opportunity identification
  4. Identification of illegal or suspicious activities
  5. Employee and customer experiences

And the z System’s role? Same as it has always been:

  • Build an agile approach to deliver applications
  • Make every transaction secure
  • Use analytics to improve outcomes at every moment

These are things every z data center should be good at. To get started with social business on z visit the IBM Connections webpage here. There happens to be an offer for the 60-day free trail (it’s a cloud app) here. Easy and free, at least should be worth a try.

IBM Connections delivers a handful of social business capabilities. The main components are home, profiles, communities, and social analytics. Other capabilities include blogs, wikis, bookmarks, and forums for idea generation and sharing. You can use the activities capability to organize your work and that of a team, and another lets you vote on ideas. Finally, it brings a media library, content management capabilities, and file management.

Along with Connections you also might want to deploy WebSphere and Java, if you haven’t already. Then, if you are serious about building out a social business around the z you’ll want to check out Bluemix and MobileFirst. Already there is an IBM Red Book out for mobile app dev on the z13. The idea, of course, is to create engaging mobile and social business apps with the z as the back end.

The biggest payoff from social business on the z comes when you add analytics, especially real-time analytics. DancingDinosaur attended a session on that topic at Edge2015 and will be taking it up in a coming post.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

2014 to be Landmark Year for the Mainframe

February 10, 2014

The official announcement is still a few weeks away and the big event won’t take place until April, but the Internet is full of items about the 50th anniversary of the mainframe. Check some out here, here, and here.

In 1991 InfoWorld editor Stewart Alsop, predicted that on March 15, 1996 an InfoWorld reader would unplug the last mainframe.  Alsop wrote many brilliant things about computing over the years, but this statement will forever stand out as one of the least informed, as subsequent events amply demonstrated.  That statement, however, later became part of the inspiration for the name of this blog, DancingDinosaur. The mainframe did not march inexorably to extinction like the dinosaur as many, many pundits predicted.

It might have, but IBM made some smart moves over the years that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance for years to come.  DancingDinosaur marks 2000 as a key year in the ongoing relevance of the mainframe; that was the year IBM got serious about Linux on the System z. It was not clear then that Linux would become the widely accepted mainstream operating system it is today.  Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed.  There is no question that Linux on the System z has become mainstream.

But it wasn’t Linux alone that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance. Java enables the development of distributed type of workloads on the System z, which is only further advanced by WebSphere on z, and SOA on z. Today’s hottest trends—cloud, big data/analytics, mobile, and social—can be handled on the z too: cloud computing on z, big data/analytics/real-time analytics on z, mobile computing on z, and even social on z.

Finally, there is the Internet of things. This is a natural for the System z., especially if you combine it with MQTT, an open source transport protocol that enables minimized pub/sub messaging across mobile networks. With the z you probably will also want to combine it with the Really Small Message Broker (RSMB). Anyway, this will be the subject of an upcoming DancingDinosaur piece.

The net net:  anything you can do on a distributed system you can do on the System z and benefit from better resiliency and security built in. Even when it comes to cost, particularly TCO and cost per workload, between IBM’s deeply discounted System z Solution Editions and the introduction of the zBC12, which delivers twice the entry capacity for the same low cost ($75k) as the previous entry-level machine (z114), the mainframe is competitive.

Also coming up is Edge 2014, which focuses on Infrastructure Innovation this year. Please plan to attend, May 19-23 in Las Vegas.  Previous Edge conferences were worthwhile and this should be equally so. Watch DancingDinosaur for more details on the specific Edge programs.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog

Social Business and Linux on System z at Enterprise 2013

October 17, 2013

The Enterprise 2013 conference next week in Orlando is sold out! However, you can still participate and learn from the session through Livestream, which starts Monday morning (8am ET) with two IBM senior VPs; Tom Rosamilia, followed by Steve Mills. On Tuesday Livestream sessions start at 10:30am ET. Check out the full Livestream schedule here.

Let’s expand on the social business topics to be covered at the conference. Building a Social Environment in an Enterprise Private Cloud looks at the advantages of building a social environment in an on-premise private cloud, exploiting System z where practical. The hybrid System z models seem particularly well suited for this, and the TCO should be quite favorable. Daily Business can Profit from Social Networks for System z looks at how to exploit social on the z to keep current with news and events of importance to the organization and its customers through Twitter and other social networks. Finally, Gaining Competitive Advantage with Social Business separates the social hype from the facts. The session keys in on utilizing social business relationships to help you achieve competitive advantages.

DancingDinosaur has long considered Linux on z as the single most important thing IBM did to save the mainframe from a future as a niche product serving mainly big banks and financial services firms. Today, the mainframe is the center of a hybrid computing world that can do anything business strategists want to do—mobile, cloud, open systems, Linux, Windows. Linux, the key to that, has been slow to catch on, but it is steadily gaining traction. At Enterprise 2013 you can see, to paraphrase a movie title starring Clint Eastwood; The Good, the Great, and the Ugly of Linux on System z.

Linux on System z: Controlling the Proliferating Penguin presents Mike Riggs, Manager of Systems and Database Administration at the Supreme Court of Virginia, sharing his experiences leveraging the power of Linux on System z by utilizing WebSphere, DB2, Oracle, and Java applications in concert with the longstanding success of z/VM, z/VSE, CICS applications, and other platform systems. He will explain how a funds-limited judicial branch of a state government is leveraging all possible resources to manage, grow, and support statewide judicial application systems.

What’s New with Linux on System z provides an overview of Linux on System z. It will show Linux as a very active open source project and offer insight into what makes Linux so special. It also looks at both the latest and as well as upcoming features of the Linux kernel and what these features can do for you.

From there, you can attend the session on Why Linux on System z Saves $$, which will help you build the business case for Linux on z. The presenter, Buzz Woeckener, Director of IT at Nationwide Insurance, will pepper you with facts, disprove some myths, and help you understand why Linux on System z is one of the best values in the marketplace today. DancingDinosaur has written on Nationwide’s Linux on z experience before; it is a great story.

Finally, here’s the ugly: Murphy’s Law Meets VM and Linux on System z. Murphy’s law observes that whatever can go wrong possibly (or probably, depending on your level of pessimism) will go wrong. This can also be the case in some unfortunate Linux on System z and z/VM proof of concepts or improperly configured production systems. Having been called into a number of these situations over the last couple of years, the speaker brings a lot of experience handling these problems. Where some sessions highlight successes, this one will present stories from the battlefield on what it took to get these projects back on track. It will show the mistakes and draw the lessons learned.

Plus there is networking, security, systems management, big data and analytics, development, and more. For those lucky enough to get space, you won’t be at a loss for what to do next. DancingDinosaur will there Sunday through Thursday. If you see me, please feel welcome to introduce yourself.

Enterprise 2013—System z Storage, Hybrid Computing, Social and More

October 10, 2013

The abstract for the Enterprise 2013 System z program runs 43 pages. Haven’t tallied the number of sessions offered but there certainly are enough to keep you busy for the entire conference (Oct. 20-25, in Orlando, register now) and longer.

Just the storage-related sessions are wide ranging, from  DFSM, which DancingDinosaur covered a few weeks back following the SHARE Boston event here, to the IBM Flash portfolio, System z Flash Express, dynamically provisioning Linux on z storage, capacity management, and more. For storage newcomers, there even is a two-part session on System z Storage Basics.

A storage session titled the Evolution of Space Management looks interesting.  After the advent of System Managed Storage (SMS), the mainframe went decades without much change in the landscape of space management processing. Space management consisted of the standard three-tier hierarchy of Primary Level 0 and the two Migration tiers, Migration Level 1 (disk) and Migration Level 2 (tape).This session examines recent advances in both tape and disk technologies that have dramatically changed that landscape and provided new opportunities for managing data on the z. Maybe they will add a level above primary called flash next year. This session will cover how the advances are evolving the space management hierarchy and what to consider when determining which solutions are best for your environment.

IBM has been going hog-wild with flash, the TMS acquisition playing no small part no doubt. Any number of sessions deal with flash storage. This one, IBM’s Flash Portfolio and Futures, seems particularly appealing. It takes a look at how IBM has acquired and improved upon flash technology over what amounts to eight generations technology refinements.  The session will look at how flash will play a major role across not only IBM’s storage products but IBM’s overall solution portfolio. Flash technology is changing the way companies are managing their data today and it is changing the way they understand and manage the economics of technology. This session also will cover how IBM plans to leverage flash in its roadmap moving forward.

Hybrid computing is another phenomenon that has swept over the z in recent years. For that reason this session looks especially interesting, Exploring the World of zEnterprise Hybrid: How Does It Work and What’s the Point? The IBM zEnterprise hybrid system introduces the Unified Resource Manager, allowing an IT shop to manage a collection of one or more zEnterprise nodes, including an optionally attached zBX loaded with blades for different platforms, as a single logical virtualized system through a single mainframe console. The mainframe can now act as the primary point of control through which data center personnel can deploy, configure, monitor, manage, and maintain the integrated System z and zBX blades based on heterogeneous architectures but in a unified manner. It amounts to a new world of blades and virtual servers with the z at the center of it.

Maybe one of the hardest things for traditional z data center managers to get their heads around is social business on the mainframe. But here it is: IBM DevOps Solution: Accelerating the Delivery of Multiplatform Applications looks at social business and mobile along with big data, and cloud technologies as driving the demand for faster approaches to software delivery across all platforms, middleware, and devices. The ultimate goal is to push out more features in each release and get more releases out the door with confidence, while maintaining compliance and quality. To succeed, some cultural, process, and technology gaps must be addressed through tools from Rational.

IBM has even set itself up as a poster child for social business in another session, Social Business and Collaboration at IBM, which features the current deployment within IBM of its social business and collaboration environments. Major core components are currently deployed on System z. The session will look at what IBM is doing and how they do it and the advantages and benefits it experiences.

Next week, the last DancingDinosaur posting before Enterprise 2013 begins will look at some other sessions, including software defined everything and Linux on z.

When DancingDinosaur first started writing about the mainframe over 20 years ago it was a big, powerful (for the time), solid performer that handled a few core tasks, did them remarkably well, and still does so today. At that time even the mainframe’s most ardent supporters didn’t imagine the wide variety of things it does now as can be found at Enterprise 2013.

Please follow DancingDinosaur and its sister blogs on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

Winning the Talent War with the System z

January 17, 2013

The next frontier in the ongoing talent war, according to McKinsey, will be deep analytics, a critical weapon required to probe big data in the competition underpinning new waves of productivity, growth, and innovation. Are you ready to compete and win in this technical talent war?

Similarly, Information Week contends that data expertise is called for to take advantage of data mining, text mining, forecasting, and machine learning techniques. The System z data center is ideally is ideally positioned to win if you can attract the right talent.

Finding, hiring, and keeping good talent within the technology realm is the number one concern cited by 41% of senior executives, hiring managers, and team leaders responding to the latest Harris Allied Tech Hiring and Retention Survey. Retention of existing talent was the next biggest concern, cited by 19.1%.

This past fall, CA published the results of its latest mainframe survey that came to similar conclusions. It found three major trends on the current and future role of the mainframe:

  1. The mainframe is playing an increasingly strategic role in managing the evolving needs of the enterprise
  2. The mainframe as an enabler of innovation as big data and cloud computing transform the face of enterprise IT
  3. Demand for tech talent with cross-disciplinary skills to fill critical mainframe workforce needs in this new view of enterprise IT

Among the respondents to the CA survey, 76% of global respondents believe their organizations will face a shortage of mainframe skills in the future, yet almost all respondents, 98%, felt their organizations were moderately or highly prepared to ensure the continuity of their mainframe workforce. In contrast, only 8% indicated having great difficulty finding qualified mainframe talent while 61% reported having some difficulty in doing so.

The Harris survey was conducted in September and October 2012. Its message is clear: Don’t be fooled by the national unemployment figures, currently hovering above 8%.  “In the technology space in particular, concerns over the ability to attract game-changing talent has become institutional and are keeping all levels of management awake at night,” notes Harris Allied Managing Director Kathy Harris.

The reason, as suggested in recent IBM studies, is that success with critical new technologies around big data, analytics, cloud computing, social business, virtualization, and mobile increasingly are giving top performing organizations their competitive advantage. The lingering recession, however, has taken its toll; unless your data center has been charged to proactively keep up, it probably is saddled with 5-year old skills at best; 10-year old skills more likely.

The Harris study picked up on this. When asking respondents the primary reason they thought people left their organization, 20% said people left for more exciting job opportunities or the chance to get their hands on some hot new technology.

Some companies recognize the problem and belatedly are trying to get back into the tech talent race. As Harris found when asking about what companies are doing to attract this kind of top talent 38% said they now were offering great opportunities for career growth. Others, 28%, were offering opportunities for professional development to recruit top tech pros. A fewer number, 24.5%, were offering competitive compensation packages while fewer still, 9%, offering competitive benefits packages.

To retain the top tech talent they already had 33.6% were offering opportunities for professional development, the single most important strategy they leveraged to retain employees. Others, 24.5%, offered opportunities for career advancement while 23.6% offered competitive salaries. Still a few hoped a telecommuting option or competitive bonuses would do the trick.

Clearly mainframe shops, like IT in general, are facing a transition as Linux, Java, SOA, cloud computing, analytics, big data, mobile, and social play increasing roles in the organization, and the mainframe gains the capabilities to play in all these arenas. Traditional mainframe skills like CICS are great but it’s just a start. At the same time, hybrid systems and expert integrated systems like IBM PureSystems and zEnterprise/zBX give shops the ability to tap a broader array of tech talent.

IBM System z for Social Business

November 30, 2011

Most IT people do not think of the System z for social business. Probably they think more in terms of x86 systems running Linux or Windows. Some might think Power Systems and AIX. The System z, however, has a good story to tell when it comes to social business, and with the zEnterprise and zBX machines that story only gets better.

Social business today generally refers to some form of collaboration, information sharing, or interaction through social networking or social media. Blogging and micro-blogging, like Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, LinkedIn, and such are what usually come to mind. Here’s a link to the Society for New Communications Research, which covers this topic in depth.

IBM, through its 1995 acquisition of Lotus Development Corp that brought it Notes, has been involved in social business for quite some time. At that time Lotus Notes was called groupware, but even then it did considerably more. Basically, it included what amounted to a Notes application development environment. Groupware was a vague concept back then. Still Notes, even then, went beyond groupware and shared documents.

Social business today is equally vague, although the market seems to be coalescing around the concept of information sharing and personal interaction, mainly for the purpose of some form of business collaboration. Lowe’s Home Centers, for example, uses IBM Connections, a Lotus Notes social business product, to enable its floor staff to quickly locate expert resources across its stores in response to customer inquiries. Lowe’s is a mainframe shop, but like many large enterprises, it supports a number of platforms. It deployed IBM Connections on AIX.

As it turns out, IBM offers several social business tools from its Lotus group. Dubbed the Lotus collaboration suite, the tools can be run on the System z or other IBM platforms. Find details on the Lotus social business tools for z here.  Of course, running the social business tools on the z instead of a distributed platform brings the advantages of the mainframe’s scalability, availability, manageability, and security.

The Lotus collaboration suite includes:

  • Lotus Domino and Lotus Notes—the original server and client components as an enterprise-class platform for critical business, collaboration, mail, and messaging applications
  • Lotus Quickr—consists of  team collaboration software for accessing and interacting with the people, information, and project materials and provides team spaces, content libraries, team discussion forums, wikis, and connectors to simplify the sharing and management of documents and information among a team
  • IBM Connections—social software for business by enabling the development and management of networks of resources and expertise
  • Lotus Sametime—the Notes platform for unified real-time communication and collaboration

For organizations looking to run these tools on the System z or zEnterprise the workloads could qualify for the System z Solution Edition discounted pricing with either the System z Solution Editions for Enterprise Linux or the IBM Enterprise Linux Server, both of which provide discounted hardware, software, middleware, and maintenance for Linux deployments on the z platform.

With any social business tools, the question of ROI becomes tricky. It is difficult to identify quantifiable measurements for collaboration or information sharing. Managers will have to look at business processes like new product development or customer service and even then the one-to-one correlation may not be there. For instance, if a Lowe’s floor person can get the right answer to a customer’s question on the spot while the customer is still there in the store, it might save a sale. Or, Lowe’s might have gotten the sale anyway. Go figure.

With the advent of the zEnterprise and hybrid computing, the System z social business story gets more interesting. It should be possible to deploy pieces of the IBM collaboration suite on different platforms and manage them as a single virtual platform under the z.


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