Posts Tagged ‘Storwize’

IBM Revamps V5000

April 5, 2019

On April 2nd IBM announced several key enhancements across the Storwize V5000 portfolio and along with new models. These new models include the V5010E, 5030E and the V5100. The E stands for EXPRESS.) To further complicate the story, it utilizes Broadwell, Intel’s new 14 nanometer die shrink of its Haswell microarchitecture. Broadwell did not completely replace the full range of CPUs from Intel’s previous Haswell microarchitecture but IBM is using it widely in the new V5000 models.

IBM NVMe Flash Core Module

And the results can be impressive. From a scale-out perspective the V5010E supports a single controller configuration, while the V5030E and V5100 both support up to two controller clusters. This provides for a maximum of 392 drives in the V5010E and a massive 1520 drives in either the V5030E or V5100 dual controller clusters. The V5030E includes the Broadwell DE 1.9GHz, 6 core processor in its two canisters. Each canister supports a maximum of 32GB of RAM. Better still, the V5100 boasts a single Skylake 1.7Ghz processor with 8 cores in each canister. RAM is increased to a total of 576GB for the entire controller, or 288GB maximum per canister.

.For the next generation Storwize V5000 platforms IBM encouraging them to be called Gen3. The Gen3 encompasses 8 new MTM (Machine Type Model) based on 3 hardware models, V5010E, V5030E and V5100. The V5100 comes in two models, a hybrid (HDD and Flash) and the All Flash model V5100F. Of these 4 types, each is available with a 1 year or 3 year warranty.

The V5000E models are based on the Gen2 hardware, with various enhancements, including more memory options on the V5010E. The V5100 models are all new hardware and bring same NVMe Flash Core Modules (FCM) that are available on the V7000 and FlashSystem9100 products, completing Core Modules the transition of the Storwize family to all NVMe arrays. If you haven’t seen or heard about IBM’s FCM technology introduced last year to optimize NVMe FCM are a family of high-performance flash drives that utilizes the NVMe protocol, a PCIe Gen3 interface, and high-speed NAND memory to provide high throughput and IOPS and very low latency. FCM is available in 4.8 TB, 9.6 TB, and 19.2 TB capacities. Hardware-based data compression and self-encryption are built in.

The all flash (F) variants of the V5000 can also attach SAS expansions to extend capacity using SAS based Flash drives to allow expansion up to 1520 drives. The drives, however, are not interchangeable with the new FCM drives. The E variants allow attachment of SAS 2.5” and 3.5” HDD drives, with the V5010E expandable to 392 drives and the others up to 1520.

Inbuilt host attachments come in the form of 10GbE ports for iSCSI workloads, with optional 16Gbit FibreChannel (SCSI or FC-NVMe) as well as additional 10GbE or 25GbE iSCSI. The V5100 models can also use the iSER (an iSCSI translation layer for operation over RDMA transports, such as InfiniBand) protocol over the 25GbE ports for clustering capability, with plans to support NVMeF over Ethernet. In terms of cache memory, the V5000E products are expandable up to 64GB per controller (IO Group) and the V5100 can support up to 576GB per controller. Similarly, IBM issued as a statement of direction for all 25GbE port types across the entire Spectrum Virtualize family of products.

As Lloyd Dean, IBM Senior Certified Executive IT Architect noted, the new lineup for the V5000 is impressive; regarding the quantity of drives, and the storage available per model will “blow your mind”. How mind blowing will depend, of course, on your configuration and IBM’s pricing. As usual, IBM talks about affordable and comparative cost and storage efficiency but they usually never state a price. But they did once 3 years ago: List price then for the V5010 was $9,250 including hardware, software and a one-year warranty, according to a published report. Today IBM will likely steer you to cloud pricing, which may or may not be a bargain depending on how the deal is structured and priced. With the cloud, everything is in the details.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

IBM Enhances Storage for 2019

February 14, 2019

It has been a while since DancingDinosaur last looked closely at IBM’s storage efforts. The latest 4Q18 storage briefing, actually was held on Feb. 5, 2019 but followed by more storage announcements 2/11 and 2/12 For your sake, this blog will not delve into each of these many announcements. You can, however, find them at the previous link.

Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta–IBM RESEARCH

As IBM likes to say whenever it is trying to convey the value of data: “data is more valuable than oil.”  Maybe it is time to update this to say data is more valuable than fresh, clean water, which is quickly heading toward becoming the most precious commodity on earth.

IBM CEO Ginny Rometty, says it yet another way: “80% of the world’s data, whether it’s decades of underwriting, pricing, customer experience, risk in loans… That is all with our clients. You don’t want to share it. That is gold,” maybe more valuable even, say, the value of fresh water. But whatever metaphor you choose to use—gold, clean water, oil, something else you perceive as priceless, this represents to IBM the value of data. To preserve the value it represents this data must be economically stored, protected, made accessible, analyzed, and selectively shared. That’s where IBM’s storage comes in.

And IBM storage has been on a modest multi-year storage growth trend.  Since 2016, IBM reports shipping 700 new NVMe systems, 850 VeraStack systems, 3000 DS8880 systems, 5500 PB of capacity, attracted 6,800 new IBM Spectrum (virtualized) storage customers, and sold 3,000 Storwize All-flash system along with 12,000 all-flash arrays shipped.

The bulk of the 2/5 storage announcements fell into 4 areas:

  1. IBM storage for containers and cloud
  2. AI storage
  3. Modern data protection
  4. Cyber resiliency

Except for modern data protection, much of this may be new to Z and Power data centers. However, some of the new announcements will interest Z shops. In particular, 219-135 –Statement of direction: IBM intends to deliver Managed-from-Z, a new feature of IBM Cloud Private for Linux on IBM Z. This will enable organizations to run and manage IBM Cloud Private applications from IBM Linux on Z or LinuxONE platforms. The new capability furthers IBM’s commitment to deliver multi-cloud and multi-architecture cloud-native technologies on the platform of the customer’s choice. Watson, too, will now be available on more platforms through newly announced Watson Anywhere—a version of IBM’s cognitive platform that can run Watson on-premises, in IBM’s cloud, or any other cloud, be it private or public.

Another interesting addition to the IBM storage line, the FlashSystem 9100. IBM FlashSystem 9100, as IBM explains it, combines the performance of flash and Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) end-to-end with the reliability and innovation of IBM FlashCore technology and the rich features of IBM Spectrum Virtualize, — all packed into a 2U enterprise-class storage system. Providing intensive data driven multi-cloud storage capacity, FlashSystem 9100 is deeply integrated with the software defined (virtualized) capabilities of IBM Spectrum Storage, allowing organizations to easily add multi-cloud solutions that best support their business..

Finally, 219-029 –IBM Spectrum Protect V8.1.7 and IBM Spectrum Protect Plus V10.1.3 deliver new application support and optimization for long term data retention. Think of it this way: as the value of data increases, you will want to retain and protect it in more data in more ways for longer and longer. For this you will want the kind of flexible and cost-efficient storage available through Spectrum Protect.

In addition, at Think, IBM announced Watson Anywhere, a version of Watson that runs on-premises, in IBM’s cloud, or any other cloud, be it private or public.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog, and see more of his work at technologywriter.com.

Can SDS and Flash Resurrect IBM Storage?

November 4, 2016

As part of IBM’s ongoing string of quarterly losses storage has consistently contributed to the red ink, but the company is betting on cloud storage, all-flash strategy, and software defined storage (SDS) to turn things around. Any turn-around, however, is closely tied to the success of IBM’s strategic imperatives, which have emerged as bright spots amid the continuing quarterly losses; especially cloud, analytics, and cognitive computing.

climate-data-requires-fast-access-1

Climate study needs large amounts of fast data access

As a result, IBM needs to respond to two challenges created by its customers: 1) changes like the increased adoption of cloud, analytics, and most recently cognitive computing and 2) the need by customers to reduce the cost of the IT infrastructure. The problem as IBM sees it is this: How do I simultaneously optimize the traditional application infrastructure and free up money to invest in a new generation application infrastructure, especially if I expect move forward into the cognitive era at some point? IBM’s answer is to invest in flash and SDS.

A few years ago DancingDinosaur was skeptical, for example, that flash deployment would lower storage costs except in situations where low cost IOPS was critical. Today between the falling cost of flash and new ways to deploy increasingly cheaper flash DancingDinosaur now believes Flash storage can save IT real money.

According to the Evaluator Group and cited by IBM, flash and hybrid cloud technologies are dramatically changing the way companies deploy storage and design applications. As new applications are created–often for mobile or distributed access–the ability to store data in the right place, on the right media, and with the right access capability will become even more important.

In response, companies are adding cloud to lower costs, flash to increase performance, and SDS to add flexibility. IBM is integrating these capabilities together with security and data management for faster return on investment.  Completing the IBM pitch, the company offers choice among on-premise storage, SDS, or storage as a cloud service.

In an announcement earlier this week IBM introduced six products:

  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize 7.8 with transparent cloud tiering
  • IBM Spectrum Scale 4.2.2 with cloud data sharing
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize family flash enhancements
  • IBM Storwize family upgrades
  • IBM DS8880 High Performance Flash Enclosure Gen2
  • IBM DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server
  • VersaStack—a joint IBM-Cisco initiative

In short, these announcements address Hybrid Cloud enablement, as a standard feature for new and existing users of Spectrum Virtualize to enable data sharing to the cloud through Spectrum Scale, which can sync file and object data across on-premises and cloud storage to connect cloud native applications. Plus, more high density, highly scalable all-flash storage now sports a new high density expansion enclosure that includes new 7TB and 15TB flash drives.

IBM Storwize, too, is included, now able to grow up to 8x larger than previously without disruption. That means up to 32PB of flash storage in only four racks to meet the needs of fast-growing cloud workloads in space-constrained data centers. Similarly, IBM’s new DeepFlash Elastic Storage Server (ESS) offers up to 8x better performance than HDD-based solutions for big data and analytics workloads. Built with IBM Spectrum Scale ESS includes virtually unlimited scaling, enterprise security features, and unified file, object, and HDFS support.

The z can play in this party too. IBM’s DS8888 now delivers 2x better performance and 3x more efficient use of rack space for mission-critical applications such as credit card and banking transactions as well as airline reservations running on IBM’s z System or IBM Power Systems. DancingDinosaur first reported on the all flash z, the DS8888, when it was introduced last May.

Finally hybrid cloud enablement for existing and new on-premises storage enhancements through IBM Spectrum Virtualize, which brings hybrid cloud capabilities for block storage to the Storwize family, FlashSystem V9000, SVC, and VersaStack, the IBM-Cisco collaboration.

Behind every SDS deployment lies some actual physical storage of some type. Many opt for generic, low cost white box storage to save money.  As part of IBM’s latest SDS offerings you can choose among any of nearly 400 storage systems from IBM and others. Doubt any of those others are white box products but at least they give you some non-IBM options to potentially lower your storage costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM’s Latest Flash Announcements Target Dell/EMC

August 26, 2016

The newest IBM storage, announced here earlier this week, aims to provide small, midsize, and global enterprises with virtualized SDS for primary storage and for cloud or cognitive applications and workloads. Central to the effort is IBM Spectrum Virtualize, which automates Storwize all-flash solutions intended to reduce the cost and complexity of data center and cloud environments. Entry pricing for the new storage starts at $19,000, which IBM describes as cost-conscious.storwize logo

IBM All-Flash for the midrange

In addition, IBM announced Flash In, a no-cost storage migration program targeting Dell/EMC customers that IBM hopes will bail out of the merged operation.

SDS in the form of IBM Spectrum Virtualize is central to making IBM’s latest all-flash offerings work for the broad set of use cases IBM envisions.  As IBM puts it: organizations today are embracing all-flash storage to deliver speed and response times necessary to support growing data workloads across public, private, and hybrid cloud environments, as well as the emerging demands of cognitive applications and workloads.

IBM Spectrum Virtualize promises to improve storage efficiency through features such as real-time data compression, thin provisioning, and snapshotting across nearly 400 different storage arrays from a multitude of vendors. That means organizations can leverage, even repurpose, physical storage capacity they already have as they scramble to meet the storage needs of new workloads.

Spectrum Virtualize also optimizes data security, reliability and operational costs. For example, the software automatically tiers and migrates data from one storage array to another, provides secure data-at-rest encryption, and remotely replicates data for disaster recovery and business continuity

The announcement centers around two products, the enterprise-class IBM Storwize V7000F and a midsize IBM Storwize 5030F,  which promise enterprise-class availability and function in a mid-range and entry-level all-flash storage array.  At the same time, both offer greater performance and require less time to provision and optimize systems. Coincidentally, IBM has just been recognized, for the third year in a row as a leader for Flash Storage in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Solid-State Arrays (SSA).

Specifically, the all-flash IBM Storwize V7000F improves performance by up to 45 percent and supports four times the clustering for scale-out and scale-up growth to help organizations manage rapidly growing datasets.  The midrange and entry level all flash IBM Storwize 5030F offers high performance and availability at a discounted entry point (noted above) to help clients control costs.

The all-flash Storwize V7000F and Storwize V5030F are also built to manage a variety of primary storage workloads, from database management systems, such as SQL Server and MySQL, to digital media sources that include broadcast, real-time streaming, and video surveillance. The new technology can also handle huge data volumes, such as IoT data.

Given the product line confusion that typically characterizes big technology platform mergers, IBM is looking to entice some Dell or, more likely, EMC storage customers to the new Storwize offerings. To that end, IBM is offering what it describes as a no-cost migration initiative for organizations that are not current IBM customers and seeking a smooth transition path from their EMC or Dell storage to the IBM family of all-flash arrays. BTW: EMC is a leading provider of z System storage.

While too early to spot any Dell or EMC customer response, one long time IBM customer, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd, has joined the flash storage party. “With ever increasing volumes of customer and operational information, flexible and secure data storage is crucial to keeping our operation afloat (hope the pun was intended) as our company expands to hundreds of destinations worldwide,” said Leonardo Irastorza, Technology Revitalization & Global Shared Services Manager. The cruise line is counting on IBM flash storage to play a critical role, especially when it comes to ensuring exceptional guest experiences across its brands.

And more is coming: IBM released the following statement of direction: IBM intends to enhance IBM Spectrum Virtualize with additional capabilities for flash drive optimization and management. These capabilities are intended to help increase the service life and usability of flash drives, particularly read-intensive flash drives. The planned capabilities will likely include:

  • Data deduplication for workloads and use cases where it complements IBM’s existing industry leading compression technology
  • Improved flash memory management (mainly for garbage collection)
  • Additional flash drive wear management and reporting.

By implementing these capabilities in IBM Spectrum Virtualize they will be available for IBM Storwize family, FlashSystem V9000, and SAN Volume Controller offerings as well as VersaStack (the IBM/Cisco collaboration) and IBM PurePower systems.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM Edge2014 as Coming out Party for OpenStack

May 7, 2014

IBM didn’t invent OpenStack (Rackspace and NASA did), but IBM’s embrace of OpenStack in March 2013 as its standard for cloud computing made it a legit standard for enterprise computing. Since then IBM has made its intention to enable its product line, from the System z on down, for the OpenStack set of open source technologies.  Judging from the number of sessions at IBM Edge 2014, (Las Vegas, May 19-23 at the Venetian) that address one or another aspect of OpenStack you might think of IBM Edge2014 almost as a coming out celebration for OpenStack and enterprise cloud computing.

OpenStack is a collection of open source technologies. the goal of which is to provide a scalable computing infrastructure for both public and private clouds. As such it has become the foundation of IBM’s cloud strategy, which is another way of saying it has become what IBM sees as its future. An excellent mini-tutorial on OpenStack, IBM, and the System z can be found at mainframe-watch-Belgium here.

At IBM Edge2014 OpenStack is frequently included in sessions on storage, cloud, and storage management.  Let’s take a closer look at a few of those sessions.

IBM Storage and Cloud Technologies

Presenter Christopher Vollmar offers an overview of the IBM storage platforms that contain cloud technologies or provide a foundation for creating a private storage cloud for block and file workloads. This overview includes IBM’s SmartCloud Virtual Storage Center, SmartCloud Storage Access, Active Cloud Engine, and XIV’s Hyper-Scale as well as IBM storage products’ integration with OpenStack.

OpenStack and IBM Storage

Presenters Michael Factor and Funda Eceral explain how OpenStack is rapidly emerging as the de facto platform for Infrastructure as a Service. IBM is working fast to pin down the integration of its storage products with OpenStack. This talk presents a high level overview of OpenStack, with a focus on Cinder, the OpenStack block storage manager. They also will explain how IBM is leading the evolution of Cinder by improving the common base with features such as volume migration and ability to change the SLAs associated with the volume in the OpenStack cloud. Already IBM storage products—Storwize, XIV, DS8000, GPFS and TSM—are integrated with OpenStack, enabling self-provisioning access to features such as EasyTier or Real-time Compression via standard OpenStack interfaces. Eventually, you should expect virtually all IBM products, capabilities, and services to work with and through OpenStack.

IBM XIV and VMware: Best Practices for Your Cloud

Presenters Peter Kisich, Carlos Lizarralde argue that IBM Storage continues to lead in OpenStack integration and development. They then introduce the core services of OpenStack while focusing on how IBM storage provides open source integration with Cinder drivers for Storwize, DS8000 and XIV. They also include key examples and a demonstration of the automation and management IBM Storage offers through the OpenStack cloud platform.

IBM OpenStack Hybrid Cloud on IBM PureFlex and SoftLayer

Presenter Eric Kern explains how IBM’s latest version of OpenStack is used to showcase a hybrid cloud environment. A pair of SoftLayer servers running in IBM’s public cloud are matched with a PureFlex environment locally hosting the OpenStack controller. He covers the architecture used to set up this environment before diving into the details around deploying workloads.

Even if you never get to IBM Edge2014 it should be increasingly clear that OpenStack is quickly gaining traction and destined to emerge as central to Enterprise IT, any style of cloud computing, and IBM. OpenStack will be essential for any private, public, and hybrid cloud deployments. Come to Edge2014 and get up to speed fast on OpenStack.

Alan Radding/DancingDinosaur will be there. Look for me in the bloggers lounge between and after sessions. Also watch for upcoming posts on DancingDinosaur about OpenStack and the System z and on OpenStack on Power Systems.

Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog.

A look at IBM Edge 2013 tracks: Storage, PureSystems & more

May 22, 2013

Nobody ever accused this blogger of being executive caliber but that hasn’t stopped me from rummaging around the Executive Track offerings at IBM Edge 2013 coming up Jun 10-14 in Las Vegas. Called the Executive Edge, the sessions run the first two and a half days and look pretty interesting. (The technical track, which is larger and runs the entire conference, actually looks much more interesting if you are inclined toward serious geekiness; this blogger intends to attend sessions from both tracks.)

Executive Edge is organized into three sections.  The third section seems to have most of the technology product material.  Here you will find sessions on PureSystems, FlashSystems, the eX5 (x86), Storwize, and Enterprise Storage (probably DS8000).  This third section also includes this intriguing topic: How Data Science Will Change the Course of History.  If I reported to an executive, I would steer him to that one, which should be intriguing to say the least.

The first section has some interesting topics.  One looks at customer usage scenarios around big data and storage.  Some of those DancingDinosaur has already covered, like the City of Honolulu.  Another session, titled All-Flash Everywhere, will probably explain to executives how flash storage radically changes several decades of traditional storage thinking. Again, DancingDinosuar covered it a few weeks back here and also on the Storage Community blog.

Another intriguing topic in this group is Storage Futures. This is being described as: The Next Big Thing in Storage is Software Defined Storage – the inclusion of cost effective, highly automated storage in a Software Define Environment. In the session the presenter will describe the value of this approach, the technologies involved, and the adoption roadmap IBM recommends clients to follow.  This is a great topic, a part of what I describe as Software Defined Everything.  This blogger has been briefed on IBM’s plans in this regard but can’t write or talk publicly until—guess when—IBM Edge 20913. This should be an interesting session.

The second section picks up where Storage Futures left off with Software Defined Networking, another part of my Software Defined Everything but one that is gaining traction today. Another session in this section will look at defending against cyber-threats with security-ready infrastructure and security intelligence in a virtualized world.

Security should attract a crowd of executives; whenever DancingDinosaur talks with executives about cloud computing you can see fear sweep over them.  The cloud, to them, is the Wild West filled with bad guys behind every rock. They may be right, but those same bad guys already are feeding on their on-premise systems. Reputable cloud computing vendors intending to survive are highly attuned to the security challenges. With luck this session will reassure them that they aren’t defenseless.

Have you registered for IBM Edge 2013 yet?  Last year this blogger was shocked at how many people–several thousand–showed up, and this year promises to be even bigger. Overall, IBM Edge 2013 will offer over 140 storage sessions, over 50 PureSystems sessions, more than 50 client case studies, and sessions on big data and analytics along with a full cloud track.  Look for me in the Social Media Lounge at the conference and in the sessions.  You can follow this blogger on Twitter for conference updates @Writer1225 and using hashtag #IBMEdge to post live Twitter comments from the conference. And then there is the FREE drink: I’ll buy a drink for the first two people who come up to me and say they read DancingDinosaur.  How’s that for motivation!


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