Posts Tagged ‘ThruPut Manager’

May 4, 2018

Compuware Tackles Mainframe Workforce Attrition and Batch Processing

While IBM works furiously to deliver quantum computing and expand AI and blockchain into just about everything, many DancingDinosaur readers are still wrestling with the traditional headaches and boosting quality and efficiency or mainframe operations and optimizing the most traditional mainframe activities there are, batch processes. Would be nice if quantum computing could handle multiple batch operations simultaneously but that’s not high on IBM’s list of quantum priorities.

So Compuware is stepping up as it has been doing quarterly by delivering new systems to expedite and facilitate conventional mainframe processes.  Its zAdviser promises actionable analytic insight to continuously improve quality, velocity and efficiency on the mainframe. While Compuware’s ThruPut Manager enables next-gen ITstaff to optimize mainframe batch execution through new visually intuitive workload scheduling.

zAdviser captures data about developers’ behaviors

zAdviser uses machine learning to continuously measure and improve an organization’s mainframe DevOps processes and development outcomes. Based on key performance indicators (KPIs), zAdviser measures application quality, as well as development speed and the efficiency of a development team. The result: managers can now make evidence-based decisions in support of their continuous improvement efforts.

The new tool leverages a set of analytic models that uncover correlations between mainframe developer behaviors and mainframe DevOps KPIs. These correlations represent the best available empirical evidence regarding the impact of process, training and tooling decisions on digital business outcomes. Compuware is offering zAdviser free to customers on current maintenance.

zAdviser leverages a set of analytic models that uncover correlations between mainframe developer behaviors and mainframe DevOps KPIs. These correlations represent the best available empirical evidence regarding the impact of process, training and tooling decisions on digital business outcomes.

Long mainframe software backlogs are no longer acceptable. Improvements in mainframe DevOps has become an urgent imperative for large enterprises that find themselves even more dependent on mainframe applications—not less. According to a recent Forrester Consulting study commissioned by Compuware, 57 percent of enterprises with a mainframe run more than half of their business-critical workloads on the mainframe. That percentage is expected to increase to 64 percent by 2019, while at the same time enterprises are failing to replace the expert mainframe workforce they have lost by attrition. Hence the need for modern, automated, intelligent tools to speed the learning curve for workers groomed on Python or Node.js.

Meanwhile, IBM hasn’t exactly been twiddling its thumbs in regard to DevOps analytics for the Z. Its zAware delivers a self-contained firmware IT analytics offering that helps systems and operations professionals rapidly identify problematic messages and unusual system behavior in near real time, which systems administrators can use to take corrective actions.

ThruPut Manager brings a new web interface that offers  visually intuitive insight for the mainframe staff, especially new staff, into how batch jobs are being initiated and executed—as well as the impact of those jobs on mainframe software licensing costs.

By implementing ThruPut Manager, Compuware explains, enterprises can better safeguard the performance of both batch and non-batch applications while avoiding the significant adverse economic impact of preventable spikes in utilization as measured by Rolling 4-Hour Averages (R4HA). Reducing the R4HA is a key way data centers can contain mainframe costs.

More importantly,  with the new ThruPut Manager, enterprises can successfully transfer batch management responsibilities to the next generation of IT staff with far less hands-on platform experience—without exposing themselves to related risks such as missed batch execution deadlines, missed SLAs, and excess costs.

With these new releases, Compuware is providing a way to reduce the mainframe software backlog—the long growing complaint that mainframe shops cannot deliver new requested functionality fast enough—while it offers a way to replace the attrition among aging mainframe staff with young staff who don’t have years of mainframe experience to fall back on. And if the new tools lower some mainframe costs however modestly in the process, no one but IBM will complain.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his work at technologywriter.com and here.

Compuware Continues Mainframe Software Renaissance

January 19, 2017

While IBM focuses on its strategic imperatives, especially cognitive computing (which are doing quite well according to the latest statement that came out today–will take up next week), Compuware is fueling a mainframe software renaissance on its own. It’s latest two announcements brings Java-like unit testing to COBOL code via its Topaz product set and automate and intelligently optimize the processing of batch jobs through its acquisition of MVS Solutions. Both modernize and simplify the processes around legacy mainframe coding thus the reference to mainframe software renaissance.

compuware-total-test-graphic-process-flow-diagram

Let’s start with Compuware’s Topaz set of graphical tools. Since they are GUI-based even novice developers can immediately validate and troubleshoot whatever changes, either intended or inadvertent, they made to the existing COBOL applications.  Compuware’s aim for Topaz for Total Test is to eliminate any notion that such applications are legacy code and therefore cannot be updated as frequently and with the same confidence as other types of applications. Basically, mainframe DevOps.

By bringing fast, developer-friendly unit testing to COBOL applications, the new test tool also enables enterprises to deliver better customer experiences—since to create those experiences, IT needs its Agile/DevOps processes to encompass all platforms, from the mainframe to the cloud.  As a result z shops can gain increased digital agility along with higher quality, lower costs, and dramatically reduced dependency on the specialized knowledge of mainframe veterans aging out of the active IT workforce. In fact, the design of the Topaz tools enables z data centers to rapidly introduce the z to novice mainframe staff, which become productive virtually from the start—another cost saver.

Today in 2017 does management still need to be reminded of the importance of the mainframe. Probably, even though many organizations—among them the world’s largest banks, insurance companies, retailers and airlines—continue run their business on mainframe applications, and recent surveys clearly indicate that situation is unlikely to change anytime soon. However, as Compuware points out, the ability of enterprises to quickly update those applications in response to ever-changing business imperatives is daily being hampered by manual, antiquated development and testing processes; the ongoing loss of specialized COBOL programming knowledge; and the risk and associated fear of introducing even the slightest defect into core mainframe systems of record. The entire Topaz design approach from the very first tool, was to make mainframe code accessible to novices. That has continued every quarter for the past two years.

This is not just a DancingDinosaur rant. IT analyst Rich Ptak from Ptak Associates also noted: “By eliminating a long-standing constraint to COBOL Compuware provides enterprise IT the ability to deliver more digital capabilities to the business at greater speed and with less risk.”

Gartner in its latest Predicts 2017, chimes in with its DevOps equivalent of your mother’s reminder to brush your teeth after each meal: Application leaders in IT organizations should adopt a continuous quality culture that includes practices to manage technical debt and automate tests focused on unit and API testing. It should also automate test lab operations to provide access to production-like environments, and enable testing of deployment through the use of DevOps pipeline tools.” OK mom; everybody got the message.

The acquisition of MVS Solutions, Compuware’s fourth in the last year, adds to the company’s collection of mainframe software tools that promise agile, DevOps and millennial-friendly management of the IBM z platform—a continuation of its efforts to make the mainframe accessible to novices. DancingDinosaur covered these acquisition in early December here.

Batch processing accounts for the majority of peak mainframe workloads at large enterprises, providing essential back-end digital capabilities for customer-, employee- and partner-facing mobile, cloud, and web applications. As demands on these back-end mainframe batch processes intensify in terms of scale and performance, enterprises are under increasing pressure to ensure compliance with SLAs and control costs.

These challenges are exacerbated by the fact that responsibility for batch management is rapidly being shifted from platform veterans with decades of experience in mainframe operations to millennial ops staff who are unfamiliar with batch management. They also find native IBM z Systems management tools arcane and impractical, which increases the risk of critical batch operations being delayed or even failing. Run incorrectly, the batch workloads risk generating excessive peak utilization costs.

The solution, notes Compuware, lies in its new ThruPut Manager, which promises automatic, intelligent optimized batch processing. In the process it:

  • Provides immediate, intuitive insight into batch processing that even inexperienced operators can readily understand
  • Makes it easy to prioritize batch processing based on business policies and goals
  • Ensures proper batch execution by verifying that jobs have all the resources they need and proactively managing resource contention between jobs
  • Reduces the organizations’ IBM Monthly Licensing Charges (MLC) by minimizing rolling four-hour average (R4HA) processing peaks while avoiding counter-productive soft capping

Run in conjunction with Strobe, Compuware’s mainframe application performance management tool, ThruPut Manager also makes it easier to optimize batch workload and application performance as part of everyday mainframe DevOps tasks. ThruPut promises to lead to more efficiency and greater throughput resulting in a shorter batch workload and reduced processing capacity. These benefits also support better cross-platform DevOps, since distributed and cloud applications often depend on back-end mainframe batch processing.

Now, go out an hire some millenials and bring fresh blood into the mainframe. (Watch for DancingDinosaur’s upcoming post on why the mainframe is cool again.)

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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