Posts Tagged ‘Topaz’

Compuware Triples Down on Promised Quarterly z System Releases

October 14, 2016

Since Jan 2015 Compuware has been releasing enhancements to its mainframe software portfolio quarterly.  The latest quarterly release, dated Oct. 3, delivers REST APIs for ISPW source code management and DevOps release automation; Integration of Compuware Abend-AID with Syncsort Ironstream to create their own custom cross-platform DevOps toolchains; and a new Seasoft Plug-In for Topaz Workbench. The Seasoft plug-in will help less skilled IBM z/OS developers to manage mainframe batch processing along with other z platform tasks

compuware-blended-ecosystem

Compuware’s point is to position the mainframe at the heart of agile DevOps computing. As part of the effort, it needs to deliver slick, modern tools that will appear to the non-mainframers who are increasingly moving into multi-platform development roles that include the mainframe. These people want to work as if they are dealing with a Windows or Linux machine. They aren’t going to wrestle with arcane mainframe constructs like Abends or JCL.  Traditional mainframe dev, test and code promotion processes are simply too slow to meet the demands of today’s fast-moving markets. The new dev and ops people who are filling out data center ranks haven’t the patience to learn what they view as antiquated mainframe concepts. They need intelligent tools that visualize the issue and let them intuitively click, drag, drop, and swipe their way through whatever needs to be done.

This is driven by the long-expected attrition of veteran mainframers and the mainframe knowledge and application insight they brought. Only the recession that began in 2008 slowed the exit of aging mainframers. Now they are leaving; one mainframe credit card processor reportedly lost 50 mainframe staff in a month.  The only way to replace this kind of experience is with intelligent and easy to learn tools and expert automation.

Compuware’s response has been to release new tools and enhancements every quarter. It started with Topaz in 2015. DancingDinosaur covered it Jan. 2015 here.  The beauty of Topaz lies in its graphical ease-of-use. Data center newbies didn’t need to know z/OS; they could understand what they were seeing and do meaningful work. With each quarterly release Compuware, in one way or another, has advanced this basic premise.

The most recent advances are streamlining the DevOps process in a variety of ways.  DevOps has emerged as critical with mainframe shops scrambling to remain relevant and effective in a rapidly evolving app dev environment. Just look at Bluemix if you want to see where things are heading.

In the first announcement, Compuware extended mainframe DevOps innovation with REST APIs for ISPW SCM and release automation. The new APIs enable large enterprises to flexibly integrate their numerous other mainframe and non-mainframe DevOps tools with ISPW to create their own custom cross-platform DevOps toolchains. Part of that was  the acquisition of the assets associated with Itegrations’s source code management (SCM) migration practice and methodology, which will  enable Compuware users to more easily migrate their SCM systems from Agile-averse products such as CA Endevor, CA Panvalet, CA Librarian, and Micro Focus/Serena ChangeMan as well as internally developed SCM systems—to ISPW

According to Compuware, these DevOps toolchains are becoming increasingly important for two reasons:

  • Enterprises must aggressively adopt DevOps disciplines in their mainframe environments to fulfill business requirements for digital agility. Traditional mainframe dev, test and code promotion processes are simply too slow to meet the demands of today’s fast-moving markets to counter new, digitally nimble market disruptors.
  • Data centers need to better integrate the toolchains that support their newly adopted mainframe DevOps workflows with those that support DevOps across their various other platforms. This is because mainframe applications and data so often function as back-end systems-of-record for front-end web and mobile systems-of-engagement in multi-tier/cross-platform environments.

In the second announcement Compuware integrated Abend-AID and Syncsort’s Ironstream to give fast, clear insight into mainframe issues. Specifically, the integration of Abend-AID and Ironstream \ enables IT to more quickly discover and act upon correlations between application faults and broader conditions in the mainframe environment. This is particularly important, notes Compuware, as enterprises, out of necessity, shift operational responsibilities for the platform to staffs with limited experience on z/OS. Just put yourself into the shoes of a distributed system manager now dealing with a mainframe. What might appear to be a platform issue may turn out to be software faults, and vice versa.  The retired 30-year mainframe veterans would probably see it immediately (but not always). Mainframe newcomers need a tool with the intelligence to recognize it for them.

With the last announcement Compuware and Software Engineering of America (SEA) introduced the release of SEA’s JCLplus+ Remote Plug-In and $AVRS Plug-In for Compuware’s Topaz Workbench mainframe IDE. Again think about mainframe neophytes. The new plug-ins for Topaz significantly ease challenging JCL- and output-related tasks, according to Compuware, effectively enabling both expert and novice IT staff to perform those tasks more quickly and more accurately in the context of their other mainframe DevOps activities.

An encouraging aspect of this is that Compuware is not doing this alone. The company is teaming up with SEA and with Syncsort to make this happen. As the mainframe vendors work to make mainframe computing easier and more available to lesser trained people it will be good for the mainframe industry as a whole and maybe even help lower the cost of mainframe operations.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghostwriter. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Compuware Continues Mainframe GUI Tool Enhancements

July 1, 2016

Early in 2015 Compuware announced the first in what it promised would be a continuing stream of new mainframe tools and tool enhancements. Did anyone really believe them? Mainframe ISVs are not widely regarded for their fast release cycles. DancingDinosaur reported on it then here and has continued to follow up and report its progress through a handful of new releases. This past week, DancingDinosaur received new Compuware mainframe tool announcements. For a mainframe ISV this is almost unheard of. IBM sometimes releases new mainframe products in intense spurts but then quickly resumes its typical languid release pace.

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Screen from Compuware’s ISPW for Continuous Delivery to the Mainframe

Let’s take a look at each of these new releases. First, ISPW Deploy, an advanced mainframe release automation solution that enables large enterprises to bring continuous delivery best practices to their IBM z/OS environments. ISPW Deploy, built on the ISPW technology Compuware acquired in January 2016, facilitates faster and more reliable mainframe software deployment. Specifically, it helps, according to Compuware, in three ways, through:

  1. Automation that rapidly moves code through the deployment process, including test staging and approvals, while also providing greatly simplified full or partial rollbacks.
  1. Visualization that enables DevOps managers to quickly pinpoint deployment issues in order to both solve immediate rollout problems and address persistent bottlenecks in code promotion.
  1. Integrations with both third-party solutions and Compuware’s own industry-leading mainframe toolkit that allow IT to build complete SCM-to-production DevOps pipelines and to quickly launch associated remediation support tools if and when deployment issues occur.

Compuware is further empowering enterprises to achieve mainframe agility by integrating. For instance, its ISPW and XebiaLabs’ cross-platform continuous delivery solutions enable IT organizations to orchestrate and visualize their mainframe DevOps processes in a common manner with their broader cross-platform DevOps automation.

The second announcement focused on Xebial Labs, as noted above. The idea here is to deliver cross-platform continuous releases for the mainframe. As Compuware explained, enterprises using XebiaLabs’ solution suite and Compuware ISPW, can now automate and monitor all phases of mainframe DevOps within the same continuous delivery management environment they use for their distributed, web, and cloud platforms. This automation and monitoring includes test/QA, pre-copy staging, and code promotion. The goal, as with all DevOps, is to speed digital agility for mainframe or distributed systems or both.

The third announcement concerned a partnership between Compuware and ConicIT that aims to help a new generation of IT ops staff proactively resolve emerging mainframe issues before they impact application service levels. It does so by integrating ConicIT’s predictive mainframe analytics with Compuware’s Strobe, which provides visually intuitive troubleshooting intelligence. Together, the two companies promise to enable even IT staff with relatively little hands-on mainframe experience to quickly identify and resolve a wide range of application performance problems.

The key to doing this is a reliance on the adoption of intuitive GUI interfaces. Compuware started this with its Topaz tools and has been continuing along this path for two years. Compuware’s CEO, Chris O’Malley, has been harping on these themes almost since he first arrived there.

Compuware customers apparently have gotten the message. As reported: “Market pressures are making it essential for us to deliver quality products and services to our clients more frequently, and the mainframe plays a critical role in that delivery,” according to Craig Danielson, Assistant Vice President for Commerce Bank. “We leverage ISPW to help in this capacity and its new capabilities will provide us the automation and visibility of our software deployment process to help us continuously improve our internal operations and services.” (note: DancingDinosaur did not validate this customer statement.)

Companies will need all the help modern mainframe tools can deliver. Mainframe data centers are facing unprecedented challenges that require unusual speed and agility. In short, they need DevOps fast. And they will have to respond with an increasingly aging core of experienced mainframe staff supplemented by millennials who have to be coaxed and cajoled onto the mainframe with easy graphical tools. If mainframe data centers can’t respond to these challenges—not just cloud, mobile, Linux, and analytics, but also IoT, blockchain, cognitive computing, and whatever else is coming along next—how are they going to cope. Already their users, the line of business managers, are turning to shadow IT out of frustration with the slow response from the mainframe data centers. And you know what comes next.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Compuware Topaz Brings Distributed Style to the Mainframe

January 30, 2015

Early in January Compuware launched the first of what it promised would be a wave of tools for the mainframe that leverage the distributed graphical style of working with systems.  The company hopes the tool, Topaz, will become a platform that hooks people experienced with distributed computing, especially Millennials, on working with the mainframe. The company is aiming not just for IT newbies but experienced distributed IT people who find the mainframe alien.

Compuware is pitching Topaz as a solution for addressing the problem of the wave of retirements of experienced mainframe veterans. The product promises to help developers, data architects, and other IT professionals discover, visualize, and work with both mainframe and non-mainframe data in a familiar, intuitive manner.  They can work with it without actually having to directly encounter mainframe applications and databases in their native formats.

compuware topaz screen

Topaz Relationship Visualizer (click to enlarge)

DancingDinosaur has received the full variety of opinions on the retiring mainframe veteran issue, ranging from a serious concern to a bogus issue. Apparently the issue differs with each mainframe shop. In this case, demographics ultimately rule, and people knowledgeable about the mainframe (including DancingDinosaur, sadly) are getting older.  Distributed IT folks, however, know how to operate data centers, manage applications, handle data, and run BI and analytics—all the things we want any competent IT shop to do. So, to speed their introduction to the mainframe it makes sense to give them familiar tools that let them work in accustomed ways.

And Topaz definitely has a familiar distributed look-and-feel. Check out a demonstration of it here. What you will see are elements of systems, applications, and data represented graphically. Click an item and the relevant relationships are exposed. Click again to drill down to detail. To move data between hosts just drag and drop the desired files between distributed hosts and the mainframe.  You also can use a single distributed-like editor to work with data on Oracle, SQL Server, IMS, DB2 and others across the enterprise. The actions are simple, intuitive, and feel like any GUI tool.

The new tool should seem familiar. Compuware built Topaz using open source Eclipse. It also made use of ISPF, the mainframe toolset. Read about Eclipse here.

With Topaz Compuware is trying to address a problem IBM has been tackling through its System z Academic Initiative—to answer where next generation of mainframers will come from.  With its contests and university curriculum IBM is trying to captivate young people early with job possibilities and slick technologies, and catch them as young as high school.

Compuware is aiming for working IT professionals in the distributed environment. They may not be much younger than their mainframe counterparts. but Compuware is giving them a tool that will allow them to immediately start doing meaningful work with both distributed and mainframe systems and do it in a way they immediately grasp.

Topaz treats mainframe and non-mainframe assets in a common manner. As Compuware noted: In an increasingly dynamic big data world it makes less and less sense to treat any platform as an island of information. Topaz takes a huge step in the right direction.

Finally, expect to see Topaz updates and enhancements quarterly. Compuware describes Topaz as an agile development effort, drawing a pointed contrast to the rather languid pace of some mainframe ISVs in getting out updates.  If the company is able to achieve its aggressive release cycle goals that alone may help change perceptions of the mainframe as a staid, somewhat dull platform.

With Topaz Compuware is off to a good start, but you can see where and how the toolset can be expanded upon.  And Compuware even hinted at opening the Topaz platform to other ISVs. Don’t hold your breath, but at the least it may get other mainframe ISVs to speed their own efforts, making the mainframe overall a more dynamic platform. With the z13 IBM raised the innovation bar (see DancingDinosaur here and here). Now other mainframe ISVs must up their game.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a long-time IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. You also can read more of my writing at Technologywriter.com and here.


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