Posts Tagged ‘Toshiba’

IBM Gets Serious About Open Data Science (ODS) with Anaconda

April 21, 2017

As IBM rapidly ramps up cognitive systems in various forms, its two remaining platforms, z System and POWER, get more and more interesting. This week IBM announced it was bringing the Anaconda Open Data Science (ODS) platform to its Cognitive Systems and PowerAI.

Anaconda, Courtesy Pinterest

Specifically, Anaconda will integrate with the PowerAI software distribution for machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL). The goal: make it simple and fast to take advantage of Power performance and GPU optimization for data-intensive cognitive workloads.

“Anaconda on IBM Cognitive Systems empowers developers and data scientists to build and deploy deep learning applications that are ready to scale,” said Bob Picciano, senior vice president of IBM Cognitive Systems. Added Travis Oliphant, co-founder and chief data scientist, Continuum Analytics, which introduced the Anaconda platform: “By optimizing Anaconda on Power, developers will also gain access to the libraries in the PowerAI Platform for exploration and deployment in Anaconda Enterprise.”

With more than 16 million downloads to date, Anaconda has emerged as the Open Data Science platform leader. It is empowering leading businesses across industries worldwide with tools to identify patterns in data, uncover key insights, and transform basic data into the intelligence required to solve the world’s most challenging problems.

As one of the fastest growing fields of AI, DL makes it possible to process enormous datasets with millions or even billions of elements and extract useful predictive models. DL is transforming the businesses of leading consumer Web and mobile application companies, and it is catching on with more traditional business.

IBM developed PowerAI to accelerate enterprise adoption of open-source ML and DL frameworks used to build cognitive applications. PowerAI promises to reduce the complexity and risk of deploying these open source frameworks for enterprises on the Power architecture and is tuned for high performance, according to IBM. With PowerAI, organizations also can realize the benefit of enterprise support on IBM Cognitive Systems HPC platforms used in the most demanding commercial, academic, and hyperscale environments

For POWER shops getting into Anaconda, which is based on Python, is straightforward. You need a Power8 with IBM GPU hardware or a Power8 combined with a Nvidia GPU, in effect a Minsky machine. It’s essentially a developer’s tool although ODS proponents see it more broadly, bridging the gap between traditional IT and lines of business, shifting traditional roles, and creating new roles. In short, they envision scientists, mathematicians, engineers, business people, and more getting involved in ODS.

The technology is designed to run on the user’s desktop but is packaged and priced as a cloud subscription with a base package of 20 users. User licenses range from $500 per year to $30,000 per year depending on which bells and whistles you include. The number of options is pretty extensive.

According to IBM, this started with PowerAI to accelerate enterprise adoption of open-source ML/DL learning frameworks used to build cognitive applications. Overall, the open Anaconda platform brings capabilities for large-scale data processing, predictive analytics, and scientific computing to simplify package management and deployment. Developers using open source ML/DL components can use Power as the deployment platform and take advantage of Power optimization and GPU differentiation for NVIDIA.

Not to be left out, IBM noted growing support for the OpenPOWER Foundation, which recently announced the OpenPOWER Machine Learning Work Group (OPMLWG). The new OPMLWG includes members like Google, NVIDIA and Mellanox to provide a forum for collaboration that will help define frameworks for the productive development and deployment of ML solutions using OpenPOWER ecosystem technology. The foundation has also surpassed 300-members, with new participants such as Kinetica, Red Hat, and Toshiba. For traditional enterprise data centers, the future increasingly is pointing toward cognitive in one form or another.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 


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