Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Arcati 2017 Mainframe Survey—Cognitive a No-Show

February 2, 2017

DancingDinosaur checks into Arcati’s annual mainframe survey every few years. You can access a copy of the 2017 report here.  Some of the data doesn’t change much, a few percentage points here or there. For example, 75% of the respondents consider the mainframe too expensive. OK, people have been saying that for years.

On the other hand, 65% of the respondents’ mainframes are involved with web services. Half also run Java-based mainframe apps, up from 30% last year, while 17% more are planning to run Java with their mainframe this year. Similarly, 35% of respondents report running Linux on the mainframe, up from 22% last year. Again, 13% of the respondents expect to add Linux this year.  Driving this is the advantageous cost and management benefits that result from consolidating distributed Linux workloads on the z. Yes, things are changing.

linuxone-5558_d_ibm_linuxone_social_tile_990_550_4_081515

The biggest surprise for DancingDinosaur, however, revolved around IBM’s latest strategic initiatives, especially cognitive computing and blockchain.  Other strategic initiatives may include, depending on who is briefing you at the moment—security, data analytics, cloud, hybrid cloud, and mobile. These strategic imperatives, especially cognitive computing, are expected to drive IBM’s revenue. In the latest statement, reported last week in DancingDinosaur, strategic imperatives amounted to 41% of revenue.  Cloud revenue and Cloud-as-a-service also rose considerably, 35% and 61% respectively.

When DancingDinosaur searched the accompanying Arcati vendor report (over 120 vendors with brief descriptions) for cognitive only GT Software came up. IBM didn’t even mention cognitive in its vendor listing, which admittedly was skimpy. The case was the same with Blockchain; only one vendor, Atos, mentioned it and nothing about blockchain in the IBM listing. More vendors, however, noted supporting one or some of the other supposed strategic initiatives.

Overall, the Arcati survey is quite positive about the mainframe. The survey found that 50 percent of sites viewed their mainframe as a legacy system (down from last year’s 62 percent). However, 22 percent (up from 16 percent last year) viewed mainframe as strategic, with 28 percent (up from 22 percent) viewing mainframes as both strategic and legacy.

Reinforcing the value of the mainframe, the survey found 78 percent of sites experienced some kind of increase in capacity. With increased demand for mainframe resources (data and processing), it should not be surprising that respondents report an 81 percent an increase in technology costs. Yet, 38 percent of sites report their people costs have decreased or stayed the same.

Unfortunately, the survey also found that 70 percent of respondents thought there were a cultural barrier between mainframe and other IT professionals. That did not discourage respondents from pointing out the mainframe advantages: 100 percent highlighted the benefit of the mainframe’s availability, 83 percent highlighted security, 75 percent identified scalability, and 71 percent picked manageability as a mainframe benefit.

Also, social media runs on the mainframe. Respondents found social media (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube) useful for their work on the mainframe. Twenty-seven percent report using social (up slightly from 25 percent last year) with the rest not using it at all despite IBM offering Facebook pages dedicated to IMS, CICS, and DB2. DancingDinosaur, only an occasional FB visitor, will check it out and report.

In terms of how mainframes are being used, the Arcati survey found that 25 percent of sites are planning to use Big Data; five percent of sites have adopted it for DevOps while 48 percent are planning to use mainframe DevOps going forward. Similarly, 14 percent of respondents already are reusing APIs while another 41 percent are planning to.

Arcati points out another interesting thought: The survey showed a 55:45 percent split in favor of distributed systems. So, you might expect the spend on the two types of platform to be similar. Yet, the survey found that 87 percent of an organization’s IT spend was going to distributed systems! Apparently mainframes aren’t as expensive as people think. Or put it another way, the cost of owning and operating distributed systems with mainframe-caliber QoS amounts to a lot more than people are admitting.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

IBM zSystem for Social—Far From Forgotten at Edge2015

May 28, 2015

Dexter Doyle and Chris Gamin (z System Middleware) titled their session at Edge2015 IBM z Systems: The Forgotten Platform in Your Social Business. They were only half joking. As systems of engagement play bigger roles in the enterprise the z is not quite as forgotten as it may once have been.  In fact, at IBM the z runs the company’s own deployment of IBM Connections, the company’s flagship social business product.

Doyle used the graphic below (copyright John Atkinson, Wrong Hands) to make the point that new tools replace familiar conventional tools in a social business world.

 social desktop

 (copyright John Atkinson, Wrong Hands, click to enlarge)

Looks almost familiar, huh? Social business is not so radical. The elements of social business have been with us all along. It’s not exactly a one-to-one mapping, but Twitter and Pinterest instead of post-it notes, LinkedIn replaces the rolodex, Instagram instead of photos on your desk, and more.  Social business done right with the appropriate tools enables efficiency, Doyle observed. You don’t see the z in this picture, but it is there connecting all the dots in the social sphere

Many traditional mainframe data centers are struggling to come to grips with social business even as mobile and social workloads increasingly flow through the z. “The biggest thing with social is the change in culture,” said Doyle in his Forgotten Platform session. You end up using different tools to do business in a more social way. Even email appears antiquated in social business.

For data centers still balking at the notion of social business, Doyle noted that by 2016, 50% of large organizations will have internal Facebook-like social networks, a widely reported Gartner finding, and 30% of these will be considered as essential as email and telephones are today. The message: social business is real and z data centers should be a big part of it.

So what parts of social business will engage with the z? Doyle suggested five to start:

  1. Social media analytics
  2. Customer sentiment
  3. Customer and new market opportunity identification
  4. Identification of illegal or suspicious activities
  5. Employee and customer experiences

And the z System’s role? Same as it has always been:

  • Build an agile approach to deliver applications
  • Make every transaction secure
  • Use analytics to improve outcomes at every moment

These are things every z data center should be good at. To get started with social business on z visit the IBM Connections webpage here. There happens to be an offer for the 60-day free trail (it’s a cloud app) here. Easy and free, at least should be worth a try.

IBM Connections delivers a handful of social business capabilities. The main components are home, profiles, communities, and social analytics. Other capabilities include blogs, wikis, bookmarks, and forums for idea generation and sharing. You can use the activities capability to organize your work and that of a team, and another lets you vote on ideas. Finally, it brings a media library, content management capabilities, and file management.

Along with Connections you also might want to deploy WebSphere and Java, if you haven’t already. Then, if you are serious about building out a social business around the z you’ll want to check out Bluemix and MobileFirst. Already there is an IBM Red Book out for mobile app dev on the z13. The idea, of course, is to create engaging mobile and social business apps with the z as the back end.

The biggest payoff from social business on the z comes when you add analytics, especially real-time analytics. DancingDinosaur attended a session on that topic at Edge2015 and will be taking it up in a coming post.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

IBM Mainframe Tweet-Up with Ross Mauri Generates Action

August 15, 2014

DancingDinosaur has participated in numerous Mainframe Tweet-Ups before, most recently Enterprise2013 and Edge2014.  The Tweet-Up last Tuesday (8/12) might have been the biggest yet, generating numerous questions and responses (over 120 in one hour by DancingDinosaur’s count) on a range of topics including Linux on the mainframe, mobile on the mainframe, and more.

A Tweet-Up is a Twitter event where a panel of experts respond to questions from an audience and interactive discussions revolve around the questions. Think of the Mainframe Tweet-Up as a very mini IBM Enterprise2014. But instead of one expert panel and 100+ participants there will be over 600 expert sessions, an army of IBM experts to present and respond to questions, and over 50 case studies where you can talk directly to the user and get the real nitty-gritty.

The central attraction of Tuesday’s Mainframe Tweet-Up was Ross Mauri, General Manager of the IBM System z business.  Mauri is a veteran of enterprise servers and systems, having previously held a similar position with Power Systems. Of course he is a strong proponent of the mainframe, but he also is a big advocate for mobile on the System z.

In a recent post Mauri notes that enterprise mobility will be a $30 billion market next year with twice as many corporate employees using their own mobile devices as they are today.  According to Gartner, by 2017, 25% of all enterprises will have a mobile app store.  Check out Mauri’s post, Mobility made possible with the mainframe, here.

Mauri really sees the System z as an essential platform for mobile: “Given IBM System z’s unprecedented enterprise scale, availability, cloud, analytics, and mobile capabilities, we (the IBM mainframe team) are poised to deliver value to clients’ enterprise mobility needs. The marketplace demands mobile capabilities and has for years because their customers demand it of them.  Across industries, consumers mandate immediate, any time access to their accounts and information.  Consider what’s possible when IBM System z delivers enterprise mobility to these institutions,” he wrote.

Africa stands to gain the most from mobile mainframe, especially when it comes to banking. Mauri continued. Nearly 80% of Africa’s population – 326 million people — is unbanked, denying them the ability to get education and business loans or support their families.  First National Bank (FNB) and the mainframe are changing that.  Using System z’s mobile bank-in-a-box solutions, FNB brings secure banking to the customer in ways they’re familiar with — to the tune of 234 million monthly mobile banking transactions.  IBM’s System z bank-in-a-box solutions eliminate the need for FNB’s customers to rely on couriers.  Families have their funds in seconds instead of days and save sizable courier fees.  For the people who now use this solution, their lives have been changed forever.

DancingDinosaur has been on top of the mobile mainframe since IBM first began talking about it in the spring of 2010, and most recently here and here. The mainframe, especially with the new discounted z/OS pricing, makes an ideal cost-efficient platform for mobile computing. The z is a particularly good choice since much of the processing resulting from mobile activity will be handled right on the z, probably even the same z.

Mobile certainly was a top topic in the Mainframe Tweet-Up. One discussion addressed whether mobile would increase mainframe workloads or just shift it to coming from different devices. Instead of using an ATM to check your balance, for example, you would use the bank’s mobile app. The responses were varied: everyone agreed that mobile would increase transaction volume overall, but the transactions would follow a different cycle, a predominantly read cycle. If you have an opinion, feel welcome to weigh in with a comment.

Another discussion focused on mainframe simplification and looked at z/OSMF and CICS Explorer as two simplification/GUI tools, along with z/OS HealthChecker, RTD, and PFA. A different discussion turned to APIs and the z; concluding that the z has the APIs to effectively work with SoftLayer and also connect with APIM. Another participant added that the z works with the RESTful API. And not surprisingly there was an active discussion on Linux on z. The expert panelists and participants overall kept things very lively.

The Mainframe Tweet-Up was a small taste of what is coming in IBM Enterprise2014, Oct. 6-10 at the Venetian in Las Vegas. Register now; last year’s event sold out. IBM is expecting over 3000 attendees.  DancingDinsosaur certainly will be there.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. You also can find him at Technologywriter.com.


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