Posts Tagged ‘virtualized storage’

Enterprise 2013 Details System z and Power Technology and New Capabilities

October 25, 2013

IBM announced a lot of goodies for z and Power users at Enterprise 2013 wrapping up in Orlando today. There were no blockbuster announcements, like a new z machine—we’re probably 12-18 months away from that and even then the first will likely focus on Power8—but it brought a slew of announcements nonetheless. For a full rundown on what was announced click here.

Cloud and analytics—not surprisingly—loom large. For example, Hadoop and a variety of other capabilities have been newly cobbled together, integrated, optimized, and presented as new big data offerings or as new cloud solutions.  This was exemplified by a new Cognos offering for CFOs needing to create, analyze and manage sophisticated financial plans that can provide greater visibility into enterprise profitability or the lack thereof.

Another announcement featured a new IBM Entry Cloud Configuration for SAP on zEnterprise. This is a cloud-enablement offering combining high-performance technology and services to automate, standardize and accelerate day-to-day SAP operations for reduced operational costs and increased ROI. Services also were big at the conference.

Kicking off the event was a dive into data center economics by Steve Mills, Senior Vice President & Group Executive, IBM Software & Systems. Part of the challenge of optimizing IT economics, he noted, was that the IT environment is cumulative. Enterprises keep picking up more systems, hardware and software, as new needs arise but nothing goes away or gets rationalized in any meaningful way.

Between 2000 and 2010, Mills noted, servers had grown at a 6x rate while storage grew at a 69x rate. Virtual machines, meanwhile, were multiplying at the rate of 42% per year. Does anyone see a potential problem here?

Mills’ suggestion: virtualize and consolidate. Specifically, large servers are better for consolidation. His argument goes like this: Most workloads experience variance in demand. But when you consolidate workloads with variance on a virtualized server the variance of the sum is less due to statistical multiplexing (which fits workloads into the gaps created by the variances). Furthermore, the more workloads you can consolidate, the smaller the variance of the sum. His conclusion: bigger servers with capacity to run more workloads can be driven to higher average utilization levels without violating service level agreements, thereby reducing the cost per workload. Finally, the larger the shared processor pool is the more statistical benefit you get.

On the basis of statistical multiplexing, the zEnterprise and the Power 795 are ideal choices for this. Depending on your workloads, just load up the host server, a System z or a big Power box, with as many cores as you can afford and consolidate as many workloads as practical.

Mills’ other cost savings tips: use flash to avoid the cost and complexity of disk storage. Also, eliminate duplicate applications—the fewer you run, the lower the cost. In short, elimination is the clearest path to saving money in the data center.

To illustrate the point, Jim Tussing from Nationwide described how the company virtualized and consolidated 60% on their 10,500 servers on a few mainframes and saved $46 million over five years. It also allowed the company to delay the need for an additional data center for 4 years.

See, if DancingDinosaur was an actual data center manager it could have justified attendance at the entire conference based on the economic tips from just one of the opening keynotes and spent the rest of the conference playing golf. Of course, DancingDinosaur doesn’t play golf so it sat in numerous program sessions instead, which you will hear more about in coming weeks.

You can follow DancingDinosaur on twitter, @mainframeblog

Red Hat Summit Challenges IBM and zEnterprise

June 29, 2012

The Red Hat Summit in Boston this week showed off a slew of new products, some of which are sure to challenge IBM although none included hardware. As for the zEnterprise there was little beyond RHEL specifically aimed its way.

Although IBM has a long relationship with Red Hat, it is becoming clear that in some cases the two companies compete.  Despite moments of discomfort, IBM managers still are generally amenable to working closely with Red Hat. Coopetition, a mix of cooperation and competition, increasingly is the norm for all technology companies, not just IBM and Red Hat.  Both companies, for instance, have a strong interest in promoting KVM, which provides a low price hypervisor option. But as one IBM manager noted, price is only a door opener for a bigger discussion.  From that bigger discussion, IBM still holds more and stronger cards when it comes to delivering a complete customer solution.

The centerpiece of the conference was Red Hat’s announcement of four open hybrid solutions; hybrid here refers to the blend of public and private clouds. Find the announcement here. The four open hybrid cloud solutions consist of:

  • OpenShift Enterprise PaaS Solution combines Red Hat CloudForms, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and JBoss Enterprise Middleware. It aims to deliver the speed and agility of PaaS desired by enterprise developers while addressing the governance and operational requirements of enterprise IT in an open and hybrid cloud.
  • Red Hat Hybrid Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) Solution, described by Red Hat as the industry’s first open hybrid cloud solution for enterprises, it includes the software needed to deploy and manage a hybrid cloud, including virtualization management with Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization; cloud management, governed self-service and systems management with Red Hat CloudForms; and guest operating system with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
  • Red Hat Cloud with Virtualization Bundle, promises to move enterprises to the cloud for the price of virtualization and consists of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization and Red Hat CloudForms, effectively combining virtualization and cloud management into the same project cycle.
  • Red Hat Storage, a software-only offering provides open source scale-out storage software for the management of unstructured data.  It is generally available with Red Hat Storage Server 2.0 today but the company has big ambitions for this.

All the above are software-only solutions. Red Hat is not getting into either the server or storage hardware business. Of these, the OpenShift PaaS product, which promises an easy on-ramp to open hybrid cloud computing with reduced complexity, sounds a little like IBM PureSystems and particularly the IBM PureSystems PureApplication System, which provides a fully integrated  hardware/software PaaS offering in a box.

Red Hat Storage, which is built around Red Hat’s recent Gluster acquisition, an open source software company that maintained GlusterFS, an open source, distributed file system capable of scaling to petabytes and beyond while handling thousands of clients. GlusterFS brings together storage building blocks over an Infiniband, RDMA, or TCP/IP interconnects to aggregate disk and memory resources and manage data within a single global namespace.

GlusterFS supports standard clients running standard applications over any standard IP network.  Red Hat’s GlusterFS gives users the ability to deploy scale-out, virtualized storage through a centrally managed and commoditized pool of storage while freeing them from monolithic legacy storage platforms.

The poster child for Red Hat Storage today is Pandora, which delivers music on demand over the net. Pandora put Red Hat Storage across 100 NAS nodes, producing what amounts to NAS in the cloud.  Where organizations have IBM storage, Red Hat Storage will virtualize and manage it as it does any other storage.

The most interesting discussion DancingDinosaur had revolved around Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). RHEL has experienced generally steady growth, and the RHEL team is cocky enough to target selected Microsoft workloads to drive further growth.  RHEL appears to be a dominant Linux distribution everywhere but on the z. Among z shops running Linux,  RHEL is treading water at around 33% share. SUSE is the dominant Linux distribution on z.  Given the upheaval SUSE has experienced you’d expect the zEnterprise to be a RHEL growth opportunity, especially with growing interest in multi-platform hybrid computing involving the z. Red Hat clearly needs to pay more attention to the z.


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