Posts Tagged ‘x86 systems’

New Software Pricing for IBM Z

July 27, 2017

One of the often overlooked benefits of the introduction of a new mainframe like the Z is cost savings. Even though the machine may cost more, the cost of the performance and capabilities it delivers typically cost less on a per unit basis. In the case of the new Z, it’s not just a modest drop in price/performance. With the new Z, IBM announced, three new Container Pricing models for IBM Z, providing greatly simplified software pricing that promises flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments.

Working on the new IBM Z

Here are the three biggest software pricing changes:

  • Predictable and Transparent Container Pricing—providing organizations greatly simplified software pricing that combines flexible deployment with competitive economics vs. public clouds and on-premises x86 environments. To IBM, a container can be any address space, however large and small. You can have any number of containers. “Container Pricing provides collocated workloads with line-of-sight pricing to a solution,” explained Ray Jones, VP, IBM Z Software and Hybrid Cloud. With container pricing, Jones continued, “the client determines where to deploy using WLM, z/OS and SCRT do the rest.”
  • Application dev and test—highly competitive stand-alone pricing for z/OS based development and test workloads. Organizations can increase their DevTest capacity up to 3 times at no additional MLC cost. This will be based on the organization’s existing DevTest workload size. Or a company can choose the multiplier it wants and set the reference point for both MLC and OTC software.
  • Payment systems pricing are based on the business metric of payments volume a bank processes, not the available capacity. This gives organizations much greater flexibility to innovate affordably in a competitive environment, particularly in the fast-growing Instant Payment segment. To use the new per payment pricing, Jones added, up front licensing of IBM Financial Transaction Manager (FTM) software is required.

The Container Pricing options are designed to give clients the predictability and transparency they require for their business. The pricing models are scalable both within and across logical partitions (LPARs) and deliver greatly enhanced metering, capping and billing capabilities. Container Pricing for IBM Z is planned to be available by year-end 2017 and enabled in z/OS V2.2 and z/OS V2.3

Jones introduced the software discounts by reiterating that this was focused on software container pricing for IBM z and promised that there will be a technology software benefit with z14 as there was with the z13. IBM, he added, will offer a way to migrate to the new pricing, “This is a beginning of a new beginning. Clearly as we go forward we want to expand what’s applicable to container pricing.” His clear implication: IBM is intent on expanding the discounting it started when, several years ago, it introduced discounts for mobile transactions running on the z, which was driving up monthly software cost averages as mobile transaction volume began to skyrocket.

To understand the latest changes you need to appreciate what IBM means by container. This is not just about Docker containers. A container to IBM simply is an address space.  An organization can have multiple containers in a logical partition and have as many containers as it wants and change the size of containers as needed.

The fundamental advantage of IBM’s container pricing is that it enables co-location of workloads to get improved performance and remove latency, thus IBM’s repeated references to line-of-sight pricing. In short, this is about MLC (4hr) pricing. The new pricing eliminates what goes on in container from consideration. The price of container is just that; the price of the container. It won’t impact the 4hr rolling average, resulting in very predictable pricing.

The benefits are straightforward: simplified pricing for qualified solutions and allowance to deploy in the best way. And IBM can price competitively to the customer’s solution; in effect solution-specific pricing. When combined with the new price metric-payments pricing IBM trying to put together a competitive cost/price story. Of course, it is all predicated on the actual prices IBM finally publishes.  Let’s hope they are as competitive as IBM implies.

DancingDinosaur never passes up an opportunity to flog IBM for overpricing its systems and services. From discussions with Jones and other IBM during the pre-launch briefings managers the company may finally understand the need to make the mainframe or z or Z or whatever IBM calls it price-competitive on an operational level today. Low TCO or low cost of IOPS or low cost of QoS is not the same.

This is especially important now. Managers everywhere appear to be waking up to the need transform their mainframe-based businesses, at least in part, by becoming competitive digital businesses. DancingDinosaur never imagined that he would post something referencing the mainframe as a cost-competitive system able to rival x86 systems not just on quality of service but on cost. With the IBM Z the company is talking about competing with an aggressive cost strategy. It’s up to you, paying customers, to force them to deliver.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst, writer, and ghost-writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Mantissa z86VM Virtualization Leverages IBM zEC12 and z/VM

September 19, 2013

Jim Porell, formerly an IBM Distinguished Engineer with hefty System z credentials, has been pushing the idea of running large numbers of cheap virtualized x86 virtual systems on the zEnterprise for over a year, when DancingDinosaur covered the announcement of his STASH initiative then. Now he is working with Mantissa, known mainly as a provider of mainframe emulation products, on its latest product, z86VM, announced here.

Mantissa z86VM promises to simplify cloud deployment while dramatically reducing virtual image costs by potentially virtualizing thousands of x86 VMs on a zEC12 z/VM partition.  Porell actually isn’t ready to estimate how many until he has done more testing. At this point, all Mantissa is promising is a system that permits you to create virtual x86 machines for use as servers or desktop systems in minutes.

As Porell puts it: existing IBM zEnterprise server customers already have the capacity to run hundreds or thousands of virtual x86 machines. Now he invites DancingDinosaur readers (and anyone else) to try a free version of the z86VM beta software—to become a beta participant, send a request using this form and z86VM Beta as the subject. This will let you try out the latest version and see for yourself. The current beta ships with Small to Medium Enterprise (SME) Linux. SME Server is a CentOS Linux distribution specifically optimized and configured for use as web, file, email, and database servers. It employs a comprehensive browser UI for all management-related tasks.

Specifically Mantissa’s z86VM provides a 32-bit virtual x86 environment which cannot be distinguished by software from real x86 hardware. That means operating systems like Linux for x86 or Windows will run without alteration under IBM z/VM. An important aspect of this virtual operating environment is that no changes are required to move 32-bit x86 operating systems and applications to the z86VM environment. Current test projection modeling shows that up to 50,000 virtual images may be able to operate efficiently on a fully configured zEnterprise server.  But Porell is not quite ready to promise that.

Mantissa hopes to tie z86VM to cloud computing. “Cloud computing, server consolidation, virtual desktops, security, and resilience are all important considerations for customers of the zEnterprise server,” said Gary Dennis, co-Founder, Mantissa, in the beta announcement. “Most x86 virtualization deployments waste 25- 50% of all available hardware capacity.  The z86VM approach can’t do that because there is no real machine,” he add. Actually, there is a real machine underlying the system, currently the zEC12 or, presumably, any other zEnterprise.

Pricing for z86VM when it is released hasn’t been formalized. “My expectation is we will charge per engine, a la zLinux pricing. However, it may be more like z/VM or VMware pricing,” says Porell. The bigger difference is that there should be many more x86 images per core than you’d see with a conventional x86 system. Since the z can run at 100% utilization without fear of failover, Porell expects to squeeze more systems onto each core, which will reduce application and operating system fees where pricing is based on actual cores.

Hybrid computing looms large in Porell and Mantissa’s hopes for z86VM.  For hybrid computing the z86VM can use the same software binary images as other platforms, Porell explains. It should speed the time to deploy those workloads as no new software versions need to be acquired or developed  while providing an ability to further reduce software license costs, environmental costs, operational expense, and complexity, he continues.

In addition, the z/VM hypervisor already is capable of running thousands of virtual system images in a single server. Most of the redundancy necessary for business resilience, fault isolation and disaster recovery is built into the z and the z/VM hypervisor. The z 86VM takes advantage of the z/VM hypervisor to provide the security functionality that isolates one virtual guest from another in such a way that bad behavior by one cannot compromise the execution or data associated with another.

At this point z86VM is looking mostly like a zEnterprise hybrid computing play.  Whether z86VM offers significant benefits beyond what you can do with a hybrid zEnterprise and z/VM will be seen what happens in the beta program, what other business compute needs they address, what they decide with pricing.

Also, hope you will register for Enterprise 2013 in Orlando, Oct 21-25. It will combine the System z and the Power Systems technical universities with an Executive Summit.  The session programs already are out for the System z and Power Systems tracks; registration has already started. Check it out here. DancingDinosaur will be there. In the coming weeks this blog will look more closely intriguing sessions.

BTW–follow DancingDinosaur at its new name on Twitter, @mainframeblog


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