Posts Tagged ‘z/OS’

IBM Discounts z/OS Cloud Activity

August 12, 2016

The latest iteration of IBM’s z/OS workload pricing aims at to lower the cost of running cloud workloads.  In a recent announcement, z Systems Workload Pricing for Cloud (zWPC) for z/OS seeks to minimize the impact of new public cloud workload transaction growth on Sub-Capacity license charges. IBM did the same thing with mobile workloads when they started driving up the 4-hour workload averages on the z. As more z workloads interact with public clouds this should start to add up, if it hasn’t already.

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Bluemix Garages in the Cloud

As IBM puts it: zWPC applies to any organization that has implemented Sub-Capacity pricing via the basic AWLC or AEWLC pricing mechanisms for the usual MLC software suspects. These include z/OS, CICS, DB2, IMS, MQ and WebSphere Application Server (WAS).  An eligible transaction is one classified as Public Cloud-originated, connecting to a z/OS hosted transactional service and/or data source via a REST or SOAP web service.  Public cloud workloads are defined as transactions processed by named Public cloud application transactions identified as originating from a recognized Public Cloud offering, including but not limited to, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, IBM Bluemix, and more.

IBM appears to have simplified how you identify eligible workloads. As the company notes: zWPC does not require you to isolate the public cloud work in separate partitions, but rather offers an enhanced way of reporting. The z/OS Workload Manager (WLM) allows clients to use WLM classification rules to distinguish cloud workloads, effectively easing the data collection requirements for public cloud workload transactions.

So how much will you save? It reportedly reduces eligible hourly values by 60 percent. The discount produces an adjusted Sub-Capacity value for each reporting hour. What that translates into on your monthly IBM software invoice once all the calculations and fine print are considered amounts to a guess at this point. But at least you’ll save something. The first billing eligible under this program starts Dec. 1, 2016.

DancingDinosaur expects IBM to eventually follow with discounted z/OS workload pricing for IoT and blockchain transactions and maybe even cognitive activity. Right now the volume of IoT and blockchain activity is probably too low to impact anybody’s monthly license charges. Expect those technologies ramp up in coming years with many industry pundits projecting huge numbers—think billions and trillions—that will eventually impact the mainframe data center and associated software licensing charges.

Overall, Workload License Charges (WLC) constitute a monthly software license pricing metric applicable to IBM System z servers running z/OS or z/TPF in z/Architecture (64-bit) mode.  The driving principle of WLS amounts to pay-for-what-you-use, a laudable concept. In effect it lowers the cost of incremental growth while further reducing software costs by proactively managing associated peak workload utilization.

Generally, DancingDinosaur applauds anything IBM does to lower the cost of mainframe computing.  Playing with workload software pricing in this fashion, however, seems unnecessary. Am convinced there must be simpler ways to lower software costs without the rigmarole of metering and workload distribution tricks. In fact, a small mini-industry has cropped up among companies offering tools to reduce costs, primarily through various ways to redistribute workloads to avoid peaks.

A modification to WLC, the variable WLC (VWLC) called AWLC (Advanced) and the EWLC (Entry), aligns with most of the z machines introduced over the past couple of years.  The result, according to IBM, forms a granular cost structure based on MSU (CPU) capacity that applies to VWLC and associated pricing mechanisms.

From there you can further tweak the cost by deploying Sub-Capacity and Soft Capping techniques.  Defined Capacity (DC), according to IBM, allows the sizing of an LPAR in MSU such that the LPAR will not exceed the designated MSU amount.  Group Capacity Limit (GCL) extends the Defined Capacity principle for a single LPAR to a group of LPARs, allowing MSU resources to be shared accordingly.  BTW, a potential downside of GCL is that is one LPAR in the group can consume all available MSUs due to a rogue transaction. Again, an entire mini industry, or maybe no so mini, has emerged to help handle workload and capacity pricing on the z.

At some point in most of the conference pricing sessions the eyes of many attendees glaze over.  By Q&A time the few remaining pop up holding a copy of a recent invoice and ask what the hell this or that means and what the f$#%@#$ they can do about it.

Have to admit that DancingDinosaur did not attend the most recent SHARE conference, where pricing workshops can get quite energetic, so cannot attest to the latest fallout. Still, the general trend with mobile and now with cloud pricing discounts should be lower costs.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Compuware Continues Mainframe GUI Tool Enhancements

July 1, 2016

Early in 2015 Compuware announced the first in what it promised would be a continuing stream of new mainframe tools and tool enhancements. Did anyone really believe them? Mainframe ISVs are not widely regarded for their fast release cycles. DancingDinosaur reported on it then here and has continued to follow up and report its progress through a handful of new releases. This past week, DancingDinosaur received new Compuware mainframe tool announcements. For a mainframe ISV this is almost unheard of. IBM sometimes releases new mainframe products in intense spurts but then quickly resumes its typical languid release pace.

compuware ispw

Screen from Compuware’s ISPW for Continuous Delivery to the Mainframe

Let’s take a look at each of these new releases. First, ISPW Deploy, an advanced mainframe release automation solution that enables large enterprises to bring continuous delivery best practices to their IBM z/OS environments. ISPW Deploy, built on the ISPW technology Compuware acquired in January 2016, facilitates faster and more reliable mainframe software deployment. Specifically, it helps, according to Compuware, in three ways, through:

  1. Automation that rapidly moves code through the deployment process, including test staging and approvals, while also providing greatly simplified full or partial rollbacks.
  1. Visualization that enables DevOps managers to quickly pinpoint deployment issues in order to both solve immediate rollout problems and address persistent bottlenecks in code promotion.
  1. Integrations with both third-party solutions and Compuware’s own industry-leading mainframe toolkit that allow IT to build complete SCM-to-production DevOps pipelines and to quickly launch associated remediation support tools if and when deployment issues occur.

Compuware is further empowering enterprises to achieve mainframe agility by integrating. For instance, its ISPW and XebiaLabs’ cross-platform continuous delivery solutions enable IT organizations to orchestrate and visualize their mainframe DevOps processes in a common manner with their broader cross-platform DevOps automation.

The second announcement focused on Xebial Labs, as noted above. The idea here is to deliver cross-platform continuous releases for the mainframe. As Compuware explained, enterprises using XebiaLabs’ solution suite and Compuware ISPW, can now automate and monitor all phases of mainframe DevOps within the same continuous delivery management environment they use for their distributed, web, and cloud platforms. This automation and monitoring includes test/QA, pre-copy staging, and code promotion. The goal, as with all DevOps, is to speed digital agility for mainframe or distributed systems or both.

The third announcement concerned a partnership between Compuware and ConicIT that aims to help a new generation of IT ops staff proactively resolve emerging mainframe issues before they impact application service levels. It does so by integrating ConicIT’s predictive mainframe analytics with Compuware’s Strobe, which provides visually intuitive troubleshooting intelligence. Together, the two companies promise to enable even IT staff with relatively little hands-on mainframe experience to quickly identify and resolve a wide range of application performance problems.

The key to doing this is a reliance on the adoption of intuitive GUI interfaces. Compuware started this with its Topaz tools and has been continuing along this path for two years. Compuware’s CEO, Chris O’Malley, has been harping on these themes almost since he first arrived there.

Compuware customers apparently have gotten the message. As reported: “Market pressures are making it essential for us to deliver quality products and services to our clients more frequently, and the mainframe plays a critical role in that delivery,” according to Craig Danielson, Assistant Vice President for Commerce Bank. “We leverage ISPW to help in this capacity and its new capabilities will provide us the automation and visibility of our software deployment process to help us continuously improve our internal operations and services.” (note: DancingDinosaur did not validate this customer statement.)

Companies will need all the help modern mainframe tools can deliver. Mainframe data centers are facing unprecedented challenges that require unusual speed and agility. In short, they need DevOps fast. And they will have to respond with an increasingly aging core of experienced mainframe staff supplemented by millennials who have to be coaxed and cajoled onto the mainframe with easy graphical tools. If mainframe data centers can’t respond to these challenges—not just cloud, mobile, Linux, and analytics, but also IoT, blockchain, cognitive computing, and whatever else is coming along next—how are they going to cope. Already their users, the line of business managers, are turning to shadow IT out of frustration with the slow response from the mainframe data centers. And you know what comes next.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Medical Mutual Gains Fast Access to z/OS Log Data via Splunk and Ironstream

June 3, 2016

Running Syncsort’s Ironstream and leveraging Splunk Enterprise, Medical Mutual of Ohio has now implemented mainframe security in real time through the Splunk® Enterprise platform. One goal is to help protect customer information stored in DB2 from unauthorized access. Syncsorts’s Ironstream, a utility, collects and forwards z/OS log data, including security data, to Splunk Enterprise and Splunk Enterprise Security.

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z/OS security data, courtesy of Syncsort

“We’ve always had visibility. Now we can get it faster, in real time directly from the mainframe,” said the insurer’s enterprise security supervisor. Previously, the company would do a conventional data transfer, which could take several hours. The new approach, sometimes referred to as a big iron-to-big data strategy, now delivers security log data in near real time. This enables the security team to correlate all the security data from across the enterprise to effectively and quickly gain visibility into user-authentication data and access attempts tracked on the mainframe. And they can do it without needing specialized expertise or different monitoring systems for z/OS.

Real-time analytics, including real-time predictive analytics, are increasingly attractive as solutions for the growng security challenges organizations are facing. These challenges are due, in large part, to the explosion of transaction activity driven by mobile computing, and soon, IoT, and Blockchain, most of which eventually finds its way to the mainframe. All of these present immediate security concerns and require fast, nearly instant security decisions. Even cloud usage, which one would expect to be mainstream in enterprises by now, often is curtailed due to security fears.

With the Ironstream and Splunk combination, Medical Mutual Medical Mutual can see previously slow-to-access mainframe data alongside other security information it was already analyzing in Splunk Enterprise. Splunk Enterprise enables a consolidated enterprise-wide view of machine data collected across the business, which makes it possible to correlate events that might not raise suspicion alone but could be indicative of a threat when seen together.

The deployment proved to be straightforward. Medical Mutual’s in-house IT team set it up in a week with Syncsort answering deployment questions to assist. Although there are numerous tools to capture log data from the mainframe, the insurer chose to go with the Splunk-Ironstream combination because it already was using Splunk in house for centralized logging. Adding mainframe security logs was an easy step. “This was affordable and it saved us from having to learn another product,” the security supervisor added. Medical Mutual runs a z13, model 409 with Ironstream.

According to the announcement, by having Ironstream leverage z/OS log data via Splunk Enterprise, Medical Mutual has enables the organization to:

  • Track security events and data from multiple platforms including IBM z/OS mainframes, Windows and distributed servers and correlate the information in Splunk Enterprise for better security.
  • Diagnose and respond to high severity security issues more quickly since data from across the entire enterprise is being monitored in real time.
  • Provide monthly and daily reporting with an up-to-the-minute account of unusual user activity.
  • Detect security anomalies and analyze their trends – the cornerstone of Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) strategies.

Real time monitoring with analytics has proven crucial for security. You can actually detect fraud while it is taking place and before serious damage is done. It is much harder to recoup loses hours, days, or, what is often the case, months later.

The Splunk platform can handle massive amounts of data from different formats and indexes and decipher and correlate security events through analytics. Ironstream brings the ability to stream mainframe security data for even greater insights, and Ironstream’s low overhead keeps mainframe processing costs low.

To try the big iron-to-big data strategy organizations can download a free Ironstream Starter Edition and begin streaming z/OS Syslog data into Splunk solutions. Unlike typical technology trials, the Starter Edition is not time-limited and may be used in production at no charge. This includes access to the Ironstream applications available for download on Splunkbase.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

 

Spectrum Suite Returns IBM to the Storage Game

January 29, 2016

The past four quarters haven’t been kind to IBM storage as the storage group racked up consecutive quarterly revenue losses. The Spectrum Suite V 1.0 is IBM’s latest software defined storage (SDS) initiative, one of the hottest trends in storage. The product release promises to start turning things around for IBM storage.

IBM Mobile Storage (Jared Lazarus/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

IBM Mobile Storage, Jamie,Thomas, GM Storage (Jared Lazarus/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

Driving interest in SDS is the continuing rapid adoption on new workload, new application, and new ways of storing and consuming data. The best thing about the Spectrum Suite is the way IBM is now delivering it—as a broad set of storage software capabilities that touch every type of storage operation. It doesn’t much matter which workloads or applications are driving it or what kind of storage you need.  Seventy percent of clients report deploying object storage, and 60% already are committed to SDS.  Over three-quarters of storage device interface (SDI) adopters also indicated a strong preference for single-vendor storage solutions.  This all bodes well for IBM’s Spectrum Suite.

Also working in IBM’s favor is the way storage has traditionally been delivered. Even within one enterprise there can be multiple point solutions from different vendors or even incompatible solutions from the same vendor. Companies need to transition among storage software offerings as business needs change, which entails adding and removing software licenses. This always is complex and may even lead to dramatic cost gyrations due to different licensing metrics and different vendor policies.  On top of that, procurement may not play along so quickly, leaving the organization with a gap in functionality.  Then there are the typical inconsistent user interfaces among offerings, which invariably reduces productivity and may increase errors.

Add to that the usual hassles of learning different products with different interfaces and different ways to run new storage processes. As a result, a switch to SDS may not be as smooth or efficient as you hoped, and it probably won’t be cheap.

IBM is counting on these storage complications, outlined above, and more to give it a distinct advantage in the SDS market  IBM should know; the company has been one of the offenders creating similar complications as they cobbled together a wide array of storage products with different interfaces and management processes over the years.

With the new Spectrum Storage Suite IBM finally appears to have gotten it right. IBM is offering a simplified and predictable licensing model for entire Spectrum Storage family. Pricing is pegged to the capacity being used, regardless of what that capacity is and how it is being used. Block, file, object—doesn’t matter; the same per-terabyte pricing applies. IBM estimates that alone can save up to 40% compared to licensing different software capabilities separately. Similarly, there are no software licensing hassles when migrating from one form of storage or data type to another. Even the cost won’t change unless you add capacity. Then, you pay the same per-terabyte cost for the additional capacity.

The Spectrum Suite and its licensing model work for mainframe shops running Linux on z and LinuxONE. Sorry, no z/OS yet.

The new Spectrum Storage approach has advantages when running a storage shop. There are no unexpected charges when using new capabilities and IBM isn’t charging for non-production uses like dev and test.

Finally, you will find a consistent user interface across all storage components in the Spectrum suite. That was never the case with IBM’s underlying storage hardware products but Spectrum SDS makes those difference irrelevant. The underlying hardware array doesn’t really matter; admins will rarely ever have to touch it.

The storage capabilities included in IBM Spectrum Storage Suite V1.0 should be very familiar to you from the traditional IBM storage products you probably are currently using. They include:

  • IBM Spectrum Accelerate, Version 11.5.3
  • IBM Spectrum Archive Enterprise Edition, Version 1.2 (Linux edition)
  • IBM Spectrum Control Advanced Edition 5.2
  • IBM Spectrum Protect Suite 7.1
  • IBM Spectrum Scale Advanced and Standard Editions (Protocols) V4.2
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize Software for SAN Volume Controller, Version 7.6
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize Software for SAN Volume Controller, Version 7.6 – Real-time Compression
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize Software for SAN Volume Controller, Version 7.6 – Encryption Software

With Spectrum Storage you can, for example, run SAN storage, storage rich servers, and a tape library. Add up the storage capacity for each and pay the per-terabyte licensing cost. Re-allocate the existing capacity between the different types of storage and your charges don’t change. Pretty nifty, huh? To DancingDinosaur, who has sat through painful discussions of complicated IBM software pricing slopes, this is how you spell relief. Maybe there really is a new IBM coming that actually gets it.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

Making the IBM Mainframe Agile and Swift

December 7, 2015

Do you remember what the mainframe was like when you started on the mainframe career path? Today IBM blurs distinctions between the mainframe and distributed environments through Linux and Java as well as cloud and mobile delivery models.  Heck, you can run Windows natively on x86 cards in a zBX cabinet managed from a console on the z itself. Maybe it’s not the most efficient way to do it and expect better ways coming from IBM, but it is doable now.

seasoft devops imageDevOps in the SDLC, Courtesy Seasoft

More than just interact, the z and distributed environment must productively and seamlessly integrate and interoperate to produce a streamlined development, test, and deployment process. Compounding the challenge: they must do it fast. Organizations can no longer wait for six-month or nine-month release cycles to introduce new capabilities. If capabilities cannot be introduced in just a few weeks max, opportunities and revenue can be lost.  Agile and batch teams have no choice; they must work together.

This calls for data center adoption of DevOps, a combination of development, testing, and operations. Already IBM has instituted DevOps on the z System. The idea of bringing agile and batch together—it almost sounds like an oxymoron or the punchline from a bad computer systems joke—no longer is farfetched. Welcome to the world of hybrid computing where what was once considered disparate and incompatible systems are being brought together, often on the same platform.

The latest generations of the mainframes have been fully hybrid-capable platforms, starting with the z10. They are capable of running mixed workloads concurrently, some of which previously belonged in the distributed platform world only. Today, a mainframe shop with the latest z13 can run traditional z/OS COBOL workloads right alongside Java and Linux workloads. Those with a zBX extension cabinet can even run Windows workloads too under the same unified mainframe management console.

If that sounds a little too kludgy for you, just jump into the cloud. From Bluemix in the cloud you can get to DevOps and find just about everything you need already there, including IBM’s StrongLoop acquisition for API management and microservices.

So now the idea of bringing batch and agile computing together on the mainframe platform doesn’t seem so farfetched.  And it won’t stop there. IBM has been doing its enterprise thing with Apple for about a year. Expect more coming.

That said; an agile mainframe/distributed DevOps environment will become increasingly necessary. How often do you release software? Previously, if an IT organization released new software every year or even every 18 months customers were satisfied. Not anymore.  Today you can’t wait six months before the organization risks falling behind. LOB managers and customers won’t wait. There are too many competitors waiting for any chance to seize an advantage. Slow system refreshes and software updates just play into these competitors’ hands.

DevOps also is essential to the organization’s mobile strategy. Companies in every industry segment are deploying new mobile apps as fast as they can and then almost immediately updating them. For many of these mobile apps the mainframe is the back end, if not the middleware too. Each mobile request for information or to make a purchase or to schedule something triggers numerous back end processes that quickly make their way to the mainframe. It had gotten to the point where IBM had to discount mobile processing on the z or it would hinder mobile growth. DancingDinosaur covered it here.

Helping to drive mobile on the z, of course, is IBM’s relationship with Apple. Over the past year the two companies have been bringing out combined enterprise-mobile applications. Now Apple just announced that it is making its popular programming language, Swift, open source. It shouldn’t take much to get it onto Bluemix. Back in Sept. 2014  IBM announced it already had a preliminary version working through Bluemix.

Although Swift is known mainly for mobile client development, today it is described as combining the performance and efficiency of compiled languages with the simplicity and interactivity of popular scripting languages.  Apple’s Swift strategy seems coming right out of IBM’s recent playbook of embracing open source communities. You can get started at the Swift website, here.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran information technology analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing at technologywriter.com and here.

API Economy Comes to the IBM z System

June 11, 2015

What comes to mind when you hear (or read) about a RESTful IBM z System? Hint: it is not a mainframe that is loafing. To the contrary, a RESTful mainframe probably is busier than it has ever been, now running a slew of new apps, most likely mobile or social apps with REST APIs connecting to z/OS-based web services plus its usual workloads. Remember web services when SOA first came to the mainframe? They continue today behind the new mobile, cloud, social, and analytical workloads that are putting the spotlight on the mainframe.

Travel and Transportation - Passenger Care

Courtesy of IBM: travel fuels mobile activity (click to enlarge)

A variety of Edge2015 sessions, given by Asit Dan, chief architect, z Service API Management and Glenn Anderson, IBM Lab Services and Training, put what the industry refers to as the emerging API economy in perspective. The z, it should come as no surprise, lies at the heart of this burgeoning API economy, not only handling transactions but also providing governance and management to the API phenomenon that is exploding. Check out IBM’s APIs for Dummies.

The difference between first generation SOA and today’s API economy lies in the new workloads—especially mobile and cloud—fueling the surging interest. The mobile device certainly is the fastest growing platform and will likely become the largest platform soon if it is not already, surpassing desktop and laptop systems.

SOA efforts initially focused on the capabilities of the providers of services, noted Dan, particularly the development, run-time invocation, and management of services. The API economy, on the other hand, focuses on the consumption of these services. It really aims to facilitate the efforts of application developers (internal developers and external business partners) who must code their apps for access to existing and new API-enabled services.

One goal of an enterprise API effort is to access already deployed services, such z-based CICS services or those of a partner. Maybe a more important goal, especially where the z is involved, is to drive use of mainframe software assets by customers, particularly mobile customers.  The API effort not only improves customer service and satisfaction but could also drive added revenue. (Have you ever fantasized of the z as a direct revenue generator?)

This calls, however, for a new set of interfaces. As Dan notes in a recent piece, APIs for accessing these assets, defined using well known standards such as web services and Representational State Transfer (REST) with JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), and published via an easily accessible catalog, make it efficient to subscribe to APIs for obtaining permissions and building new applications. Access to the APIs now can be controlled and tracked during run-time invocations (and even metered where revenue generation is the goal).

Now the API economy can morph into a commercial exchange of business functions, capabilities, and competencies as services using web APIs, noted Glenn Anderson at Edge2015. In-house business functions running on the z can evolve into an API as-a-service delivery vehicle, which amounts to another revenue stream for the mainframe data center.

The API economy often is associated with the concept of containers. Container technology provides a simplified way to make applications more mobile in a hybrid cloud, Anderson explained, and brings some distinct advantages. Specifically, containers are much smaller in size than virtual machines and provide more freedom in the placement of workloads in a cloud (private, public, hybrid) environment. Container technology is being integrated into OpenStack, which is supported on the z through IBM Cloud Manager. Docker is the best known container technology and it works with Linux on z.

With the combination of SOA, web services, REST, JSON, OpenStack, and Docker all z capable, a mainframe data center can fully participate in the mobile, apps, cloud API economy. BTW, POWER servers also can play the API, OpenStack, Docker game too. Even Watson can participate in the API economy through IBM’s early March acquisition of AlchemyAPI, a provider of scalable cognitive computing API services. The acquisition will drive the API economy into cognitive computing too. Welcome to the mainframe API economy.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

IBM z Systems at Edge2015

April 9, 2015

There are so many interesting z Systems sessions at IBM Edge2015 that DancingDinosaur can’t come close to attending them all or even writing about them.  Edge2015 will be in Las Vegas, May 10-15, at the Venetian, a huge hotel that just happens to have a faux Venice canal running within it (and Vegas is in the desert, remember).

The following offers a brief summation of a few z Systems sessions that jumped out at me.  In the coming weeks Dancing Dinosaur will look at sessions on Storage, Power Systems, cross-platform sessions, and middleware. IBM bills Edge2015 as the Infrastructure Innovation Conference so this blog will try at least to touch on bits of all of it. Am including the session numbers and presenters but please note that session and presenters may change.

radcliffe mobile as the next evolutionCourtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

Session zBA1909; Mobile and Analytics Collide – A New Tipping Point; presenter Mark Simmonds

DancingDinosaur starting following mobile on z in 2012 and was reporting IBM mobile successes as recently as last month, click here. In this session Simmonds observes organizations being driven to deliver more insight and smarter outcomes in pursuit of increasing revenue and profit while lowering business costs and risks. The ubiquity of mobile devices adds two important dimensions to business analytics, the time and location of customers. Now you have an opportunity to leverage both via the mobile channel but only if your analytics strategy can respond to the demands of the mobile moment. At this session you’ll see how customers are using IBM solutions and the z to deliver business critical insight across the mobile community and hear how organizations are setting themselves apart by delivering near real-time analytics.

Session zBA1822; Hadoop and z Systems; presenter Alan Fellwock

DancingDinosaur looked at Hadoop on z as early as 2011. At that point it was mainly an evolving promise. By this past fall it had gotten real, click here.  In this session, Fellwock notes that various use cases are emerging that require Hadoop processing in conjunction with z Systems. In one category, the data originates on the z Systems platform itself—this could be semi-structured or unstructured data held in DB2 z/OS, VSAM or log files in z/OS. In another category, the data originates outside z Systems –this could be social media data, email, machine data, etc.—but needs to be integrated with core data on z Systems. Security and z Systems governance becomes critical for use cases where data originates on z Systems. There are several z Hadoop approaches available, ranging from Hadoop on Linux to an outboard Hadoop cluster under z governance to a cloud model that integrates with SoftLayer.

Session zAD1876; Bluemix to Mainframe – Making Development Accessible in the Cloud; presenter Rosalind Radcliffe

Cloud capability and technology is changing the way enterprises go to market. DancingDinosaur interviewed Radcliffe for a posting on DevOps for the mainframe in March. DevOps is about bringing the entire organization together, including development and operations, to more efficiently deliver business value be it on premise, off premise, or in a hybrid cloud environment. This session promises to explore how IBM DevOps solutions can transform the enterprise into a high quality application factory by leveraging technology across platforms and exploiting both systems of record and systems of engagement applications. It will show how to easily expose your important data and customer applications to drive innovation in a nimble, responsive way, maintaining the logic and integrity of your time-tested systems.

Session zAD1620; APIs to the Enterprise: Unlocking Mainframe Assets for Mobile and Cloud Applications; presenter Asit Dan

The emergence of APIs has changed how organizations build innovative mobile and web applications, enter new markets, and integrate with cloud and third party applications. DancingDinosaur generally refers to this as the API economy and it will become only more important going forward. IBM z Systems data centers have valuable assets that support core business functions. Now they can leverage these assets by exposing them as APIs for both internal and external consumption. With the help of IBM API Management, these organizations can govern the way APIs are consumed and get detailed analytics on the success of the APIs and applications that are consuming them. This session shows how companies can expose z Systems based functions as APIs creating new business opportunities.

Session zAD1469; Java 8 on IBM z13 – An Unstoppable Force Meets an Immovable Object; presenter Elton De Souza

What happens when you combine the most powerful commercially available machine on the planet with the latest iteration of the most popular programming language on the planet? An up to 50% throughput improvement for your generic applications and up to 2x throughput improvement for your security-enabled applications – that’s what! This session covers innovation and performance of Java 8 and IBM z13. With features such as SMT, SIMD and cryptographic extensions (CPACF) exploitation, IBM z Systems is once again pushing the envelope on Java performance. Java 8 is packed with features such as lambdas and streams along with improved performance, RAS and monitoring that continues a long roadmap of innovation and integration with z Systems. Expect to hear a lot about z13 at Edge2015.

Of course, there is more at Edge2015 than just z Systems sessions. There also is free evening entertainment. This year the headliner act is Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians. DancingDinosaur’s favorite, however, is Grace Potter, who delivers terrific hard rock and roll. Check her out here.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. And join DancingDinsosaur at IBM Edge2015. You will find me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices.

System z Software Pricing at IBM Enterprise 2014

September 17, 2014

DancingDinosaur must have sat through more of David Chase’s presentations on System z software pricing than anyone who doesn’t actually buy System z software. And still it seems impossibly complicated.  The problem is the many different and changing circumstances under which a mainframe shop will use its System z. It speaks to IBM’s willingness to try to accommodate almost any use case for the mainframe while trying to be fair and still make a buck.

The last time DancingDinosaur wrote on mainframe software pricing it looked at IBM’s z/OS discounts for mobile transactions. It generated considerable interest. Well, there is more on mainframe software pricing at IBM Enterprise2014, Oct. 6-10 in Las Vegas. If you are paying workload pricing, you will want to check out these sessions:

IBM System z Software Pricing Overview by David Chase, who has spoken on this at numerous conferences and manages to make it understandable. This session introduces the software pricing options available for IBM’s zEnterprise and System z servers. It covers a variety of Monthly License Charge (MLC) metrics, including the newest ones: Advanced Workload License Charge (AWLC) and Advanced Entry Workload License Charge (AEWLC). It also introduces the IPLA “one-time charge” pricing and how it differs from MLC. Although the primary focus is on z/OS pricing, these pricing concepts also apply to z/VSE and z/TPF. If your organization is not taking advantage of these programs, you probably are over-paying for mainframe software.

Introduction to Sub-Capacity Pricing and Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool, again by David Chase. If your shop decides to adopt sub-capacity pricing for System z software, use of the Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool (SCRT) will be required whether you run z/OS, z/VSE and/or z/TPF. Attend this session to understand what the SCRT is, how it works, how to use it and how to interpret the output of the tool, the Sub-Capacity Report. This session also covers the planning steps for successful implementation of SCRT and discusses the end-to-end implementation process of collecting the required SMF data, running SCRT, reviewing the reports, and submitting them to IBM.

IBM System z Sub-Capacity and the SCRT Report by David Chase, of course. This session goes a step beyond the session above. Sub-capacity pricing for System z software is the way most customers achieve the optimal price performance available to them. But this means that the way your system is configured and used is very likely to have an impact upon the software charges you pay, and use of the Sub-Capacity Reporting Tool (SCRT) will be required. Attend this session to understand how SCRT works beyond the introductory level, how to use it, how to interpret the output of the tool (the Sub-Capacity Report), and most importantly, what options you have to tune your system to influence your monthly software charges.  

Software Licensing for Distributed Linux Middleware on IBM System z by David Chase, clearly the public face of IBM pricing. Many people understand how sub-capacity software licensing works for z/OS and z/VSE. Less well known—IBM also offers sub-capacity licensing for distributed Linux middleware when it runs on System z. Attend this session to understand how the Passport Advantage virtualization and sub-capacity licensing rules work in a Linux on System z environment, especially when you are using IFL engines running under the control of z/VM.

Mainframe software licensing is maddening and has little to do with what attracts people to enterprise computing. As a result, mainframe people stay away from it, leaving it to lawyers and the folks in purchasing, who may be even less prepared to tackle the subject than you. Big mistake. Once you are aware of how it works you can arrange workloads to ensure the lowest price. BTW, if you bring in a name brand consultant for advice on reducing mainframe data center costs, the first thing they check are your software invoices. Skip the consultant; bring your questions to David Chase’s sessions at Enterprise 2014. It will pay for your trip.

Also, don’t miss three evenings of live performances: 2 country rock groups, Delta Rae and The Wild Feathers and then, Rock of Ages. Check out all three and more here

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Look for me at Enterprise2014. You can follow this blog and more on Twitter, @mainframeblog. Find Alan Radding on Technologywriter.com.

IBM-Apple Deal Enhanced by New z/OS Pricing Discounts

July 25, 2014

In the spring, IBM announced, almost as an aside, new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile transactions. At the time, it didn’t seem like a big deal. But IBM’s more recent announcement of its exclusive mobile partnership with Apple, covered by DancingDinosaur here, suddenly gives it much bigger potential.

The plan is to create apps that can transform specific aspects of how businesses and employees work using iPhone and iPad, allowing companies to achieve new levels of efficiency, effectiveness and customer satisfaction. At the backend will be the mainframe.

Already zEnterprise shops, especially banks and financial services firms, are reporting growth in the volume of transactions that originate from mobile devices. The volume of these mobile-originated transactions in some cases is getting large enough to impact the four-hour peak loads that are used in calculating monthly costs.

Here’s the problem: you put out a mobile app and want people to use it. They do, but much of the workload being generated does not directly produce revenue. Rather, they are requesting data or checking invoices and balances. Kind of a bummer to drive up monthly charges with non-revenue producing work.

That’s where the new pricing discounts for z/OS mobile workloads come in. The new pricing reduces the impact of these mobile transactions on reported LPAR MSUs. Specifically, the Mobile Workload Pricing Reporting Tool (MWRT) will subtract 60% of the reported Mobile MSUs from a given LPAR in each hour, adjusting the total LPAR MSU value for that hour. Think of this as just a standard SCRT report with a discount built in to adjust for mobile workload impact.

So, what does that translate into in terms of hard dollar savings? DancingDinosaur had a private briefing with two IBMers who helped build the tool and asked that question. They are only in the earliest stages of getting actual numbers from users in the field; the tool only became available June 30.  Clearly the results depend on how many mobile transactions you are handling in each reporting hour and how you are handling the workloads.

There is a little work involved but the process won’t seem intimidating to mainframe shops accustomed to IBM’s monthly reporting process. Simply record mobile program transaction data, including CPU seconds, on an hourly basis per LPAR, load the resulting data file into the new tool, MWRT, each month using the IBM-specified CSV format, and run MWRT, submitting the results to IBM each month. It replaces the SCRT process.

The MWRT will function like a partial off-load from a software pricing perspective. When an LPAR value is adjusted, all software running in the LPAR will benefit from lower MSUs. The tool will calculate the monthly MSU peak for a given machine using the adjusted MSU values.

This brings us back to the hard dollar savings question. The answer: probably not much initially unless your mobile apps already generate a sizeable proportion of your peak transaction volume. But jump ahead six months or a year when the IBM-Apple partnership’s new iOS made-for-business apps are gaining traction your mobile transaction volume could be climbing substantially each month. At that point, savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars or more seem quite possible.

Of course, the new applications or the entire partnership could be a bust. In that case, you will have burned some admin time for a one-time set up. You’ll still experience whatever normal transaction growth your current mobile apps generate and collect your discounted MSU charges. Unless the big IT analysis firms are dead wrong, however, mobile transactions are not going away. To the contrary, they will only increase. The bottom line: negligible downside risk while the upside gain could be huge.

Hope to see you at IBM Enterprise 2014 in Las Vegas, Oct. 6-10. DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog and at Technologywriter.com

 

 

2014 to be Landmark Year for the Mainframe

February 10, 2014

The official announcement is still a few weeks away and the big event won’t take place until April, but the Internet is full of items about the 50th anniversary of the mainframe. Check some out here, here, and here.

In 1991 InfoWorld editor Stewart Alsop, predicted that on March 15, 1996 an InfoWorld reader would unplug the last mainframe.  Alsop wrote many brilliant things about computing over the years, but this statement will forever stand out as one of the least informed, as subsequent events amply demonstrated.  That statement, however, later became part of the inspiration for the name of this blog, DancingDinosaur. The mainframe did not march inexorably to extinction like the dinosaur as many, many pundits predicted.

It might have, but IBM made some smart moves over the years that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance for years to come.  DancingDinosaur marks 2000 as a key year in the ongoing relevance of the mainframe; that was the year IBM got serious about Linux on the System z. It was not clear then that Linux would become the widely accepted mainstream operating system it is today.  Last year over three-quarters of the top 100 enterprises had IFLs installed.  There is no question that Linux on the System z has become mainstream.

But it wasn’t Linux alone that ensured the mainframe’s continued relevance. Java enables the development of distributed type of workloads on the System z, which is only further advanced by WebSphere on z, and SOA on z. Today’s hottest trends—cloud, big data/analytics, mobile, and social—can be handled on the z too: cloud computing on z, big data/analytics/real-time analytics on z, mobile computing on z, and even social on z.

Finally, there is the Internet of things. This is a natural for the System z., especially if you combine it with MQTT, an open source transport protocol that enables minimized pub/sub messaging across mobile networks. With the z you probably will also want to combine it with the Really Small Message Broker (RSMB). Anyway, this will be the subject of an upcoming DancingDinosaur piece.

The net net:  anything you can do on a distributed system you can do on the System z and benefit from better resiliency and security built in. Even when it comes to cost, particularly TCO and cost per workload, between IBM’s deeply discounted System z Solution Editions and the introduction of the zBC12, which delivers twice the entry capacity for the same low cost ($75k) as the previous entry-level machine (z114), the mainframe is competitive.

Also coming up is Edge 2014, which focuses on Infrastructure Innovation this year. Please plan to attend, May 19-23 in Las Vegas.  Previous Edge conferences were worthwhile and this should be equally so. Watch DancingDinosaur for more details on the specific Edge programs.

And follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter: @mainframeblog


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