Posts Tagged ‘Power Systems’

POWER Systems for Cloud & Linux at IBM Edge2015

April 23, 2015

In October, IBM introduced a new range of POWER systems capable of handling massive amounts of computational data faster at nearly 20 percent better price/performance than comparable Intel Xeon v3 processor-based systems, delivering to clients a superior alternative to closed, commodity-based data center servers. DancingDinosaur covered it last October here. Expect this theme to play out big at IBM

Edge2015 in Las Vegas, May 10-15. Just a sampling of a few of the many POWER sessions makes that clear:

IBM Power S824L

Courtesy of Studio Stence, Power S824L (click to enlarge)

(lCV1655) Linux on Power and Linux on Intel: Side By Side, IT Economics Positioning; presenter Susan Proietti Conti

Based on real cases studied by the IBM Eagle team for many customers in different industries and geographies, this session explains where and when Linux on Power provides a competitive alternative to Linux on Intel. The session also highlights the IT economic value of architecture choices provided by the Linux/KVM/Power stack, based on open technologies brought by POWER8 and managed through OpenStack. DancingDinosaur periodically covers studies like these here and here.

(lCV1653) Power IT Economics Advantages for Cloud Service Providers and Private Cloud Deployment; presenter Susan Proietti Conti

Since the announcement of POWER8 and building momentum of the OpenPOWER consortium, there are new reasons for cloud service providers to look at Power technology to support their offerings. As an alternative open-based technology to traditional proprietary technologies, Power offers many competitive advantages that can be leveraged for cloud service providers to deliver IaaS services and other types of service delivery. This session illustrates what Power offers by highlighting client examples and the results of IT economics studies performed for different cloud service providers.

(lSY2653) Why POWER8 Is the Platform of Choice for Linux; presenter Gary Andrews

Linux is the platform of choice for running next generation workloads. With POWER8, IBM is investing heavily into Linux and is adding major enhancements to the Power platform to make it the server of choice for running Linux workloads. This session discusses the new features and how they can help run business faster and at lower costs on the Power platform. Andrews also points out many advanced features of Linux on Power that you can’t do with Linux on x86. He shows how competitive comparisons and performance tests demonstrate that POWER8 increases the lead over x86 latest processor family. In short, attend this session to understand the competitive advantages that POWER8 on Linux can deliver compared to Linux on x86.

(pBA1244) POWER8: Built for Big Data; presenter William Starke

Starke explains how IBM technologies from semiconductors through micro-architecture, system design, system software, and database and analytic software culminate in the POWER8 family of products optimized around big data analytics workloads. He shows how the optimization across these technologies delivers order-of-magnitude improvements via several example scenarios.

 (pPE1350) Best Practices Guide to Get Maximum Performance from IBM POWER8; presenter Archana Ravindar

This session presents a set of best practices that have been tried and tested in various application domains to get the maximum performance of an application on a POWER8 processor. Performance improvement can be gained at various levels: the system level, where system parameters can be tuned; the application level, where some parameters can be tuned as there is no one-size-fits-all scenario; and the compiler level, where options for every kind of application have shown to improve performance. Some options are unique to IBM and give an edge over competition in gaming applications. In cases where applications are still under development, Ravindar presents guidelines to ensure the code runs fastest on Power.

DancingDinosaur supports strategies that enable data centers to reuse existing resources like this one. (pCV2276) Developing a POWERful Cloud Strategy; presenter, Susan Schreitmueller

Here you get to examine decision points for how and when to use an existing Power infrastructure in a cloud environment. This session covers on-premises and off-premises, single vs. multi-tenant hosting, and security concerns. You also review IaaS, PaaS, and hybrid cloud solutions incorporating existing assets into a cloud infrastructure. Discover provisioning techniques to go from months to days and then to hours for new instances.

One session DancingDinosaur hasn’t found yet is whether it is less costly for an enterprise to virtualize a couple of thousand Linux virtual machines on one of the new IBM Power servers pictured above or on the z13 as an Enterprise Linux server purchased under the System z Solution Edition Program. Hmm, will have to ask around about that. But either way you’d end up with very low cost VMs compared to x86.

Of course, save time for the free evening entertainment. In addition to Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians, and rocker Grace Potter, here, there will be a weird but terrific group, 2Cellos as well.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Please follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. Please join DancingDinosaur at IBM Edge2015. You will find me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices.

Storage Looms Large at IBMEdge 2015

April 17, 2015

Been a busy year in storage with software defined storage (SDS), real-time compression, flash, storage virtualization, OpenStack, and more all gaining traction. Similarly, big data, analytics, cloud, and mobile are impacting storage. You can expect to find them and more at IBM Edge2015, coming May 10-15 in Las Vegas.

 But storage continues to make news every week. Recently IBM scientists demonstrated an areal recording density triumph, hitting 123 billion bits of uncompressed data per square inch on low cost, particulate magnetic tape. That translates into the equivalent of a 220 terabyte tape cartridge that could fit in the palm of your hand, or comparable to 1.37 trillion mobile text messages or the text of 220 million books, which would require a 2,200 km bookshelf spanning from Las Vegas to Houston, Texas. (see graphic below)

Tape compression breakthrough

Courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

Let’s take a look at some sessions delving into the current hot storage topics at Edge2015, starting with tape, since we’ve been talking about it.

(sSS1335) The Future of Tape; presenter Mark Lantz. He discusses current and future scaling trends of magnetic tape technology—see announcement above—from the perspective of IBM Research. He begins by first comparing recent scaling trends of both tape and hard disk drive technology. He then looks at future capacity scaling potential of tape and hard disks. In that context he offers an in-depth look at a new world record tape areal density demonstration of more than 100 Gb/in2, performed by IBM research in collaboration with Fujifilm, using low cost particulate tape media. He also discusses the new hardware and tape media technologies developed for this demonstration as well as key challenges for the continued scaling of tape.

If you are thinking future, check out this session too. (sBA2523) Part III: A Peek into the Future; presenter Bruce Hillsberg. This session looks at novel and innovate technologies to address clients’ most challenging technical and business problems across a wide range of technologies and disciplines. The presentation looks at everything from the most fundamental materials level all the way to working on the world’s largest big data problems. Many of the technologies developed by the Storage Systems research team lead to new IBM products or become new features in existing products. Topics covered in this lecture include atomic scale storage, research into new materials, advances in current storage media, advanced object stores, cloud storage, and more.

Combine big data, flash, and the z13 all here. (sBA1952) How System z13 and IBM DS8870 Flash Technology Enables Your Hadoop Environments; presenter Renan Ugalde.  Analyzing large amounts of data introduces challenges that can impact the goals of any organization. Companies require a reliable and high performing infrastructure to extract value from their structure and unstructured data. The unique features offered by the integration of IBM System z13 and DS8870 Flash technology enable a platform to support real-time decisions such as fraud detection. This session explains how integration among System z13, DS8870, and Hadoop maximizes performance by enabling the infrastructure’s unique big data capabilities.

Jon Toigo is an outstanding non-IBM presenter and somewhat of an iconoclast when it comes to storage. This year he is offering a 3-part session on Disaster Recovery Planning in an Era of Mobile Computing and Big Data:

  • (aBA2511) Part I: For all the hype around hypervisor-based computing and new software-defined infrastructure models, the ongoing need for disaster preparedness is often being buried in the discussion. High availability server clustering is increasingly believed to trump disaster recovery preparations, despite the fact that the transition to an agile data center is fraught with disaster potentials. In the first of three sessions, Toigo looks at the trends that are occurring in IT and the potential they present for disruption.
  • sBA2512) Part II: builds on the previous session by examining the technologies available for data protection and the trend away from backups in favor of real-time mirroring and replication. He notes promising approaches, including storage virtualization and object storage that can make a meaningful contribution.
  • (sBA2513) Part III: completes his disaster recovery planning series with the use of mobile computing technologies and public clouds as an adjunct to successful business recovery following an unplanned interruption event. Here he discusses techniques and technologies that either show promise as recovery expediters or may place businesses at risk of an epic fail.

Several SDS sessions follow: (sSS0884) Software Defined Storage — Why? What? How? Presenter: Tony Pearson. Here Pearson explains why companies are excited about SDS, what storage products and solutions IBM has to offer, and how they are deployed. This session provides an overview of the new IBM Spectrum Storage family of offerings.

 A second session by Pearson. (sCV3179): IBM Spectrum Storage Integration in IBM Cloud Manager with OpenStack: IBM’s Cloud Storage Options; presenter Tony Pearson. This session will look at the value of IBM storage products in the cloud with a focus on OpenStack. Specifically, it will look at how Spectrum Virtualize can be integrated and used in a complete 3-tier app with OpenStack.

Finally, (sSS2453) Myth Busting Software Defined Storage – Top 7 Misconceptions; presenter Jeffrey Barnett. This session looks at the top misconceptions to cut through the hype and understand the real value potential. DancingDinosaur could only come up with six misconceptions. Will have to check out this session for sure.

Of course, save time for the free evening entertainment. In addition to Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians, and rocker Grace Potter, here. There also will be a weird but terrific group, 2Cellos. Stick with it to the end (about 3 min.) for the kicker.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. And join DancingDinsosaur at IBM Edge2015. You will find me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices.

IBM z Systems at Edge2015

April 9, 2015

There are so many interesting z Systems sessions at IBM Edge2015 that DancingDinosaur can’t come close to attending them all or even writing about them.  Edge2015 will be in Las Vegas, May 10-15, at the Venetian, a huge hotel that just happens to have a faux Venice canal running within it (and Vegas is in the desert, remember).

The following offers a brief summation of a few z Systems sessions that jumped out at me.  In the coming weeks Dancing Dinosaur will look at sessions on Storage, Power Systems, cross-platform sessions, and middleware. IBM bills Edge2015 as the Infrastructure Innovation Conference so this blog will try at least to touch on bits of all of it. Am including the session numbers and presenters but please note that session and presenters may change.

radcliffe mobile as the next evolutionCourtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

Session zBA1909; Mobile and Analytics Collide – A New Tipping Point; presenter Mark Simmonds

DancingDinosaur starting following mobile on z in 2012 and was reporting IBM mobile successes as recently as last month, click here. In this session Simmonds observes organizations being driven to deliver more insight and smarter outcomes in pursuit of increasing revenue and profit while lowering business costs and risks. The ubiquity of mobile devices adds two important dimensions to business analytics, the time and location of customers. Now you have an opportunity to leverage both via the mobile channel but only if your analytics strategy can respond to the demands of the mobile moment. At this session you’ll see how customers are using IBM solutions and the z to deliver business critical insight across the mobile community and hear how organizations are setting themselves apart by delivering near real-time analytics.

Session zBA1822; Hadoop and z Systems; presenter Alan Fellwock

DancingDinosaur looked at Hadoop on z as early as 2011. At that point it was mainly an evolving promise. By this past fall it had gotten real, click here.  In this session, Fellwock notes that various use cases are emerging that require Hadoop processing in conjunction with z Systems. In one category, the data originates on the z Systems platform itself—this could be semi-structured or unstructured data held in DB2 z/OS, VSAM or log files in z/OS. In another category, the data originates outside z Systems –this could be social media data, email, machine data, etc.—but needs to be integrated with core data on z Systems. Security and z Systems governance becomes critical for use cases where data originates on z Systems. There are several z Hadoop approaches available, ranging from Hadoop on Linux to an outboard Hadoop cluster under z governance to a cloud model that integrates with SoftLayer.

Session zAD1876; Bluemix to Mainframe – Making Development Accessible in the Cloud; presenter Rosalind Radcliffe

Cloud capability and technology is changing the way enterprises go to market. DancingDinosaur interviewed Radcliffe for a posting on DevOps for the mainframe in March. DevOps is about bringing the entire organization together, including development and operations, to more efficiently deliver business value be it on premise, off premise, or in a hybrid cloud environment. This session promises to explore how IBM DevOps solutions can transform the enterprise into a high quality application factory by leveraging technology across platforms and exploiting both systems of record and systems of engagement applications. It will show how to easily expose your important data and customer applications to drive innovation in a nimble, responsive way, maintaining the logic and integrity of your time-tested systems.

Session zAD1620; APIs to the Enterprise: Unlocking Mainframe Assets for Mobile and Cloud Applications; presenter Asit Dan

The emergence of APIs has changed how organizations build innovative mobile and web applications, enter new markets, and integrate with cloud and third party applications. DancingDinosaur generally refers to this as the API economy and it will become only more important going forward. IBM z Systems data centers have valuable assets that support core business functions. Now they can leverage these assets by exposing them as APIs for both internal and external consumption. With the help of IBM API Management, these organizations can govern the way APIs are consumed and get detailed analytics on the success of the APIs and applications that are consuming them. This session shows how companies can expose z Systems based functions as APIs creating new business opportunities.

Session zAD1469; Java 8 on IBM z13 – An Unstoppable Force Meets an Immovable Object; presenter Elton De Souza

What happens when you combine the most powerful commercially available machine on the planet with the latest iteration of the most popular programming language on the planet? An up to 50% throughput improvement for your generic applications and up to 2x throughput improvement for your security-enabled applications – that’s what! This session covers innovation and performance of Java 8 and IBM z13. With features such as SMT, SIMD and cryptographic extensions (CPACF) exploitation, IBM z Systems is once again pushing the envelope on Java performance. Java 8 is packed with features such as lambdas and streams along with improved performance, RAS and monitoring that continues a long roadmap of innovation and integration with z Systems. Expect to hear a lot about z13 at Edge2015.

Of course, there is more at Edge2015 than just z Systems sessions. There also is free evening entertainment. This year the headliner act is Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians. DancingDinosaur’s favorite, however, is Grace Potter, who delivers terrific hard rock and roll. Check her out here.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. And join DancingDinsosaur at IBM Edge2015. You will find me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices.

IBM Edge 2015 as All Platforms Infrastructure Innovation Conference

April 2, 2015

Please join DancingDinosaur at IBM Edge2015 at the Venetian in Las Vegas, May 10-15. It will consist of an Executive Edge track and a Technical track. The program is crammed with hundreds of sessions.  You can find the Technical track session list here. Dare you to find even 10 sessions that don’t interest you.

 marie wieck with IBM poster

Courtesy of IBM: Marie Wieck, General Manager, Middleware (click to enlarge)

This year Edge2015 merges last year’s two events, IBMEdge and Enterprise 2014, into what IBM calls the Infrastructure Innovation Conference. It is IBM’s only US event covering all IBM platforms—System Storage, IBM z Systems, IBM Power Systems, and IBM Middleware at a single venue.  It includes three Technical Universities: System Storage, z Systems, and Power Systems for those working toward certification.

Executive Edge, which this post will look at a little more closely below, offers an exclusive two-day summit for IT executives and leaders , as IBM explains, featuring the latest innovations and technology announcements, client success stories, insightful presentations from IBM executives and industry thought leaders. Plus, IBM promises top tier, one-on-one executive meetings and exclusive networking opportunities.

The IBM Systems and Technology Group (STG) top brass will be there. This IBM Systems lineup includes: Tom Rosamilia, Senior Vice President; Stephen Leonard, General Manager, Sales; Jamie M. Thomas, General Manager, IBM Storage & Software Defined Systems; Ross Mauri, General Manager, z Systems; Doug Balog, General Manager, Power Systems; and Marie Wieck General Manager, Middleware.

And then there is the free entertainment IBM provides. The headliner act is Penn & Teller, a pair of magicians. DancingDinosaur’s favorite, however, is Grace Potter, who delivers terrific hard rock and roll. If you skip the casinos you can catch both and avoid losing money in the process.

With the Executive track IBM promises to present its most innovative approaches to using IBM Systems and Middleware as a foundation for challenging new areas of information management including:

  • Cloud Infrastructure, especially hybrid clouds
  • Big Data and Analytics
  • Systems of Record
  • Systems of Engagement
  • Mobile and Security Services
  • Flash and Storage Virtualization
  • Software Defined Infrastructure

Cloud and big data/analytics have become accepted pillars of IT business value. Mobile, flash, and software-defined infrastructure are being widely embraced as the next wave of IT value delivery. And security must be a priority for everything. Also included will be dozens of client case studies.

Throughout both the Executive and Technology tracks there will be numerous sessions citing client cases and use cases. Although not the same both show how to actually deploy technology for business value.

For example, the session (cCV0821) titled Be Hybrid or Die, revolves around hybrid clouds. The session promises a clear understanding of the term hybrid and why hybrid has become the next step in IT value creation, extraction, and efficiency gains. Citing use cases the session will show how to map your business needs to the functional business blocks of hybrid clouds and to the IBM products portfolio that address those needs. It concludes by examining where IBM is investing, its long term view, and how this will increase your IT flexibility.

Speaking of cases, a session (cIT0514) titled How to Create Rock Solid Business Cases to Get IT Projects Approved looks at the subject of case studies from a standpoint of the IT person charged with answering the unavoidable ROI question. BTW, DancingDinosaur develops business cases based on various looks at cost of ownership should you need help.  They are time consuming but necessary. Management requires an understanding of current IT costs and strengths and the expected payback to better assess new ideas and technologies. This session identifies the key elements of an effective IT cost analysis and explores how to build compelling business cases around those costs and, you hope, quantifiable benefits. Concepts discussed include complexity analysis, platform assessment, Fit for Purpose analysis, and financial case structures. Hmmm, definitely one DancingDinosaur will attend.

Another session looks at the first customer experiences using SAP HANA on Power. SAP HANA is the company’s in-memory, column-oriented RDBMS that handles both high volume transactions and complex analytical query processing on the same platform, and does so very fast since all is in-memory. The session, (lBA0464) titled SAP HANA on Power Systems: First Experiences from Customers in the Test and Evaluation Program, reports on the first experiences gathered from the pilot clients. This presentation begins with a short overview of SAP HANA in general, and then covers specific aspects in the deployment of SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems and IBM storage. You’ll hear about the advantages of SAP HANA on Power Systems (vs. x86) and discover how fast and easy it is to implement in a private cloud with full use of PowerVM capabilities.

In about six weeks DancingDinosaur will be heading to IBM Edge2015. Please join me there. You can find me hanging out wherever people gather around available power outlets to recharge mobile devices. DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. And join DancingDinsosaur at IBM Edge2015.

IBM DevOps for the Mainframe

March 27, 2015

DevOps is not just for distributed platforms. IBM has a DevOps strategy for large enterprises (usually mainframe shops) too. Nationwide, a longtime mainframe shop, is an early adopter of DevOps and already is reporting significant gains: reduction in critical software defects by 80% and a 20% efficiency gain in its maintenance and support operations in just 18 months.

DevOps, an agile methodology, establishes a continuous feedback loop between software development and deployment/operations that speeds development and deployment while ensuring quality. This is a far cry from the waterfall development methodologies of the mainframe past.

 desz DevOps adoption model

Courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

The IBM DevOps initiative, announced last November (link above), taps into the collaborative capabilities of IBM’s Cloud portfolio to speed the delivery of software that drives new models of engagement and business. Software has become the rock star of IT with software-driven innovation becoming a primary strategy for creating and delivering new value to customers. A survey of 400 business and IT executives by the IBM Institute for Business Value showed businesses that are more effective at software delivery are also more profitable than their peers nearly 70% of the time. As such, IBM notes, DevOps provides a way for businesses to remain competitive, applying lean and agile principles to software development to speed the delivery of software that meets new market requirements.

Some mainframe shops, however, continue to operate from a software standpoint as if client/server computing and PCs were still the new game in town. Meanwhile the business units keep complaining about how long it takes to make software changes while long backlogs drag on the IT budget.

DevOps is about continuous software development and deployment. That means continuous business planning, continuous collaborative dev, continuous testing, continuous release and deployment, continuous monitoring, and continuous feedback and optimization in a never ending cycle. Basically, continuous everything.  And it really works, as Nationwide can attest.

But DevOps makes traditional mainframe shops nervous. Mainframe applications are rock solid and crashes and failures almost unheard of. How can they switch to DevOps without risking everything the mainframe stands for, zero failure?

The answer: mainframe DevOps that leads straight into continuous testing, not deployment. The testing can and should be as rigorous and extensive as is necessary to reassure that everything works as it should and anything that will fail has failed. Only then does it go into production.

It would be comforting to the data centers to say that DevOps only addresses systems of engagement; those pesky mobile, collaborative, and social systems that suddenly are making demands on the core mainframe production applications. But that is not correct. DevOps is about integrating systems of engagement with systems of record, the enterprise’s mainframe crown jewels. The trick is to bring together the culture, processes, and tools across the entire software delivery lifecycle, as IBM says, to span it all—mobile to mainframe, slowing down only to conduct as exhaustive testing as the enterprise requires.

Mainframe tools from the era of waterfall methodologies won’t cut it. Rational offers a set of tools starting with Blue Agility. IBM also offers an expanded set of tools acquired through acquisitions such as UrbanCode (release automation) and GreenHat (software quality and testing solutions for the cloud and more) that offer an integrated developer experience on open cloud platforms such as Bluemix to expedite DevOps collaboration, according to IBM.

Expect push back from any attempt to introduce DevOps into a traditional mainframe development culture. Some shops have been developing systems the same way for 30 years or more. Resistance to change is normal. Plan to start gradually, implementing DevOps incrementally.

Some shops, however, may surprise you. Here the mainframe team senses they are falling behind. IBM, of course, has tools to help (see above). Some experts recommend focusing on automated testing early on; when testing is automated DevOps adoption gets easier, they say, and old school developers feel more reassured.

At IBM Edge2015, there are at least 2 sessions on DevOps: Light Up Performance of Your LAMP Apps and DevOps with a Power Optimized Stack; and CICS Cloud DevOps = Agility2. BTW, it is a good time to register for IBM Edge2015 right away, when you can still get a discount. IBM Edge2015, being billed as the Infrastructure Innovation Conference, takes place May 11 – 15 at The Venetian in Las Vegas. DancingDinsosaur will be there. Have just started pouring over the list of sessions on hundreds of topics for every IBM platform and infrastructure subject. IBM Edge2015 combines what previously had been multiple conferences into one.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here. And join DancingDinsosaur at IBM Edge2015.

Vodafone Spain Picks IBM zSystem for Smarter Cities Initiative

March 19, 2015

The Vodafone initiative, as reported here previously, leverages the most advanced mobile communications technology including citywide sensors and a Global M2M Platform that will enable the connection of thousands of sensors to the intelligent Vodafone Connected City system. The new cloud-based system will run on IBM Linux z Systems. The Linux z Systems were selected for their high security, which protects cloud services while also delivering the speed, availability, and efficiency required to drive mobile services at scale.  To do something at scale you really do want the z System.

 vodafone zsystem running linux

Courtesy of IBM: zSystem and Linux

For Vodafone this represents the beginning of what they refer to as a Smarter Cities services initiative. The effort targets local governments and city councils with populations ranging between 20.000 – 200.000 citizens. The services provided will address customer’s needs in the following key areas: urban vitality, public lighting, energy efficiency, waste management, and citizen communications.

In effect, Vodafone is becoming a SaaS provider by leveraging their new zSystem. Vodafone’s customers for this are the government groups that opt to participate. The company announced the effort at the World Mobile Congress in Barcelona at the beginning of the month.

One of the initial participants will be Seville, the capital of the province of Andalucía, where a control and development center will be established by Vodafone. The telco will invest more than 243 million euros over two years on telecommunications infrastructure, encouraging the development of the technology sector and developing projects to create strategic growth in the region.

Initially, the center will focus on creating smart city solutions that can easily and efficiently be used by cities ranging from 20,000 to 150,000 residents; cities that otherwise may not have the funds to invest in smart city infrastructure projects on their own. This center is also expected to help make the Andalucía territory of Spain a leader in the development of Big Data and smart solutions.

IBM is delivering the full stack to Vodafone: a set of cloud services that include an enterprise zSystem Linux server (IBM zBC12), v7000 storage, IBM intelligent operations, an information services solution, and more.  Vodafone opted for the z and Linux to enable cost-efficient, highly secure cloud services while also delivering the speed, availability and efficiency required to drive mobile services at scale. IBM Intelligent Operations software will provide monitoring and management of city services. IBM’s MobileFirst platform will be used to create citizen-facing mobile applications while IBM Information Server and Maximo asset management software will round out the IBM stack.

Overall, IBM, the zSystem, and Linux brought a number of benefits to this initiative. Specifically, the zSystem proved the least expensive when running more than seven vertical services as Vodafone is planning. An example of such a vertical service is the public lighting of a city. This also is where scalability brings a big advantage. Here again, the zSystem running Linux delivers scalability along with greater security and regulatory compliance. Finally, another critical capability for Vodafone was the zSystem’s ability to isolate workloads.

In short, the zSystem’s security and regulation compliance; reliability, resilience, and robustness; strong encoding and workload isolation, workload management and ability to meet SLAs; scalability; and high efficiency clinched the Vodafone deal.

This could prove a big win for IBM and the zSystem. Vodafone has mobile operations in 26 countries, partners with mobile networks in 54 more, and runs fixed broadband operations in 17 markets. As of the end of 2014, Vodafone had 444 million mobile customers and 11.8 million fixed broadband customers. Vodafone Spain’s 14.811.000 mobile customers and 2.776.000 broadband ones will certainly take maximum advantage of the zSystem’s scalability and reliability.

…as a follow up to last week’s report on recent success coming from the OpenPower Foundation that string continued this week at the OpenPOWER Inaugural Summit with the OpenPOWER Foundation announcing more than ten hardware solutions spanning systems, boards, cards, and a new microprocessor customized for the Chinese market.  Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers.

Among the products and prototypes OpenPOWER members revealed are:

  • Firestone, a prototype of a new high-performance server targeting exascale computing and projected to be 5-10x faster than today’s supercomputers. It incorporate technology from NVIDIA and Mellanox.
  • The first GPU-accelerated OpenPOWER developer platform, the Cirrascale RM4950, resulting from collaboration between NVIDIA, Tyan, and Cirrascale.
  • An open server specification and motherboard mock-up combining OpenPOWER, Open Compute and OpenStack by Rackspace and designed to run OpenStack services.

Other member-developed new products leverage the Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface (CAPI), a hallmark feature built into the POWER architecture. DancingDinosaur initially covered CAPI here.

Reminder: it is time to register for IBM Edge2015 in Las Vegas May 10-15. Edge2015 combines all of IBM’s infrastructure products with both a technical track and an executive track.  You can be sure DancingDinosaur will be there. Watch for upcoming posts here that will highlight some of the more interesting sessions.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

OpenPOWER Starts Delivering the Goods

March 13, 2015

Are you leery of multi-vendor consortiums? DancingDinosaur as a rule is skeptical of the grand promises they make until they actually start delivering results. That was the case with OpenPOWER last spring when you read here that the OpenPOWER Foundation was introduced and almost immediately forgotten.

 power8 cpu blocks

IBM POWER8 processor, courtesy of IBM (click to enlarge)

But then last fall DancingDinosaur reported on NVIDIA and its new GPU accelerator integrated directly into the server here. This too was an OpenPOWER Foundation-based initiative. Suddenly, DancingDinosaur is thinking the OpenPOWER Foundation might actually produce results.

For example, IBM introduced a new range of systems capable of handling massive amounts of computational data faster at nearly 20 percent better price/performance than comparable Intel Xeon v3 Processor-based systems. The result:  a superior alternative to closed, commodity-based data center servers. Better performance and at a lower price. What’s not to like?

The first place you probably want to apply this improved price/performance is to big data, which generates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data across the planet every day. Even the miniscule portion of this amount that you actually generate will very quickly challenge your organization to build a sufficiently powerful technology infrastructures to gain actionable insights from this data fast enough and at a price you can afford.

The commodity x86 servers used today by most organizations are built on proprietary Intel processor technology and are increasingly stretched to their limits by workloads related to big data, cloud and mobile. By contrast, IBM is designing a new data centric approach to systems that leverages the building blocks of the OpenPOWER Foundation.

This is plausible given the success of NVIDIA with its GPU accelerator. And just this past week Altera demonstrated its OpenPOWER-based FPGA, now being used by several other Foundation members who are collaborating to develop high-performance compute solutions that integrate IBM POWER chips with Altera’s FPGA-based acceleration technologies.

Formed in late 2013, the OpenPOWER Foundation has grown quickly from 5 founders to over 100 today. All are collaborating in various ways to leverage the IBM POWER processor’s open architecture for broad industry innovation.

IBM is looking to offer the POWER8 core and other future cores under the OpenPOWER initiative but they are also making previous designs available for licensing. Partners are required to contribute intellectual property to the OpenPOWER Foundation to be able to gain high level status. The earliest successes have been around accelerators and such, some based on POWER8’s CAPI (Coherence Attach Processor Interface) expansion bus built specifically to integrate easily with external coprocessors like GPUs, ASICs and FPGAs. DancingDinosaur will know when the OpenPOWER Foundation is truly on the path to acceptance when a member introduces a non-IBM POWER8 server. Have been told that may happen in 2015.

In the meantime, IBM itself is capitalizing on the OpenPower Foundation. Its new IBM Power S824L servers are built on IBM’s POWER8 processor and tightly integrate other OpenPOWER technologies, including NVIDIA’s GPU accelerator. Built on the OpenPOWER stack, the Power S824L provides organizations the ability to run data-intensive tasks on the POWER8 processor while offloading other compute-intensive workloads to GPU accelerators, which are capable of running millions of data computations in parallel and are designed to significantly speed up compute-intensive applications.

Further leveraging the OpenPOWER Foundation at the start of March IBM announced that SoftLayer will offer OpenPOWER servers as part of its portfolio of cloud services. Organizations will then be able to select OpenPOWER bare metal servers when configuring their cloud-based IT infrastructure from SoftLayer, an IBM company. The servers were developed to help organizations better manage data-intensive workloads on public and private clouds, effectively extending their existing infrastructure inexpensively and quickly. This is possible because OpenPOWER servers leverage IBM’s licensable POWER processor technology and feature innovations resulting from open collaboration among OpenPOWER Foundation members.

Due in the second quarter, the SoftLayer bare metal servers run Linux applications and are based on the IBM POWER8 architecture. The offering, according to IBM, also will leverage the rapidly expanding community of developers contributing to the POWER ecosystem as well as independent software vendors that support Linux on Power and are migrating applications from x86 to the POWER architecture. Built on open technology standards that begin at the chip level, the new bare metal servers are built to assist a wide range of businesses interested in building custom hybrid, private, and public cloud solutions based on open technology.

BTW, it is time to register for IBM Edge2015 in Las Vegas May 10-15. Edge2015 combines all of IBM’s infrastructure products with both a technical track and an executive track.  You can be sure DancingDinosaur will be there. Watch for upcoming posts here that will highlight some of the more interesting sessions.DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding, a veteran IT analyst and writer.

Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. See more of his IT writing on Technologywriter.com and here.

Software Licensing for IBM System z Distributed Linux Middleware

October 10, 2014

DancingDinosaur can’t attend a mainframe conference without checking out at least one session on mainframe software pricing by David Chase, IBM’s mainframe pricing guru. At IBM Enterprise2014, which wraps up today, the topic of choice was software licensing for Linux middleware. It’s sufficiently complicated to merit an entire session.

In case you think Linux on z is not in your future, maybe you should think again.  Linux is gaining momentum in even the largest z data centers. Start with IBM bringing new apps like InfoSphere, BigInsights (Hadoop), and OpenStack to z. Then there are apps from ISVs that just weren’t going to get their offerings to z/OS. Together it points to a telltale sign something is happening with Linux on z. And, the queasiness managers used to have about the open source nature of Linux has long been put to rest.

At some point, you will need to think about IBM’s software pricing for Linux middleware. Should you find yourself getting too lost in the topic, check out these links recommended by Chase:

To begin, software for Linux on z is treated differently than traditional mainframe software in terms of pricing. With Linux on z you think in terms of IFLs.  The quantity of IFLs represent the number of Linux engines subjected to IBM’s IPLA-based pricing.

Also think in terms of Processor Value Units (PVUs) rather than MSUs. For a pricing purposes, PVUs are analogous to MSUs although the values are different. A key point to keep in mind: distributed PVUs for Linux are not related to System z IPLA value units used for z/VM products. As is typical of IBM, those two different kinds of value units are NOT interchangeable.

Chase, however, provides a few ground rules:

  • Dedicated partition
    • Processors are always allocated in whole increments
    • Resources are only moved between partitions “explicitly” (e.g. by an operator or a scheduled job)
  • Shared pool:
    • Pool of processors shared by partitions (including virtual machines)
    • System automatically dispatches processor resources between partitions as needed
  • Maximum license requirements
  • Customer does not have to purchase more licenses for a product than the number of processors on the machine (e.g. maximum DB2 UDB licenses on a 12-way machine is 12)
    • Customer does not have to purchase more “shared pool” licenses for a product than the number of processors assigned to the shared pool (e.g. maximum of 7 MQSeries licenses for a shared pool with 7 processors). Note: This limit does not affect the additional licenses that might be required for dedicated partitions.

With that, as Chase explains it, Linux middleware pricing turns out to be relatively straightforward, determined by:

  • Processor Value Unit (PVU) rating for each kind of core
  • Any difference for different processor technologies (p, i, x, z, Sun, HP, AMD, etc—notice that the z is just one of many choices, not handled differently from the others
  • Number of processor cores which must be licensed (z calls them IFLs)
  • Price per PVU (constant per product, not different based upon technology)

Then it becomes a case of doing the basic arithmetic. The formula: # of PVUs x the # of cores required x the value ($) per core = your total cost.  Given this formula it is to your advantage to plan your Linux use to minimize IFLs and cores. You can’t do anything about the cost per PVU.

Distributed PVUs are the basis for licensing middleware on IFLs and are determined by the type of machine processor. The zEC12, z196, and z10 are rated at 120 PVUs. All others are rated at 100 PVUs. For example, any distributed middleware running on Linux on z this works out to:

  • z114—1IFL, 100 PVUs
  • z196—4IFLs, 480 PVUs
  • zEC12—8 IFLs, 960 PVUs

Also, distributed systems Linux middleware offerings are eligible for sub-capacity licensing. Specifically, sub-capacity licensing is available for all PVU-priced software offerings that run on:

  • UNIX (AIX, HP-UX, and Sun Solaris
  • i5/OS, OS/400
  • Linux (System i, System p, System z)
  • x86 (VMware ESX Server, VMware GSX Server, Microsoft Virtual Server)

IBM’s virtualization technologies also are included in Passport Advantage sub-capacity licensing offering, including LPAR, z/VM virtual machines in an LPAR, CPU Pooling support introduced in z/VM 6.3 APAR VM65418, and native z/VM (on machines which still support basic mode).

And in true z style, since this can seem more complicated than it should seem, there are tools available to do the job. In fact Chase doesn’t advise doing this without a tool. The current tool is the IBM License Metric Tool V9.0.1. You can find more details on it here.

If you are considering distributed Linux middleware software or are already wrestling with the pricing process, DancingDinosaur recommends you check out Chase’s links at the top of this piece. Good luck.

DancingDinosaur is Alan Radding. Follow DancingDinosaur on Twitter, @mainframeblog. You can check out more of my work at Technologywriter.com

Real-Time Analytics on z Lead at IBM Enterprise2014 Opening Day

October 8, 2014

Users have always been demanding about performance. But does the 5-minute rule noted by Tom Rosamilia in the opening keynote at IBM Enterprise2014 go too far? It now seems users expect companies to respond, or at least acknowledge, their comments, questions, or problems in five minutes. That means companies need to monitor and analyze social media in real-time and respond appropriately.

Building on client demand to integrate real-time analytics with consumer transactions, IBM yesterday announced new capabilities for its System z. Specifically, IBM is combining the transactional virtues of the z with big data analytic capabilities into a single, streamlined, end-to-end data system. This real-time integration of analytics and transaction processing can allow businesses to increase the value of a customer information profile with every interaction the customer makes.  It also promises one way to meet the 5-minute rule, especially when a customer posts a negative comment on social media.

With the new integrated capability you can apply analytics to social sentiment and customer engagement data almost as the transactions are occurring. The goal is to gain real-time insights, which you can do on the mainframe because the data already is there and now the real time analytics will be there. There is no moving of data or logic.  The mainframe already is doing this when it is being used for fraud prevention. This becomes another case where the mainframe can enable organizations to achieve real-time insights and respond within five minutes. Compared to fraud analysis the 5-minute expectation seems a luxury.

By incorporating social media into the real time analytic analysis on the mainframe you can gain an indication of how the business is performing in the moment, how you stack up to your competitors, and most importantly, meet the 5-minute response expectation.  Since we’re talking about pretty public social sentiment data, you also could monitor your competitors’ social sentiment and analyze that to see how well they are responding.

And then there are the more traditional things you can do with the integration of analytics with transactional data to provide real-time, actionable insights on commercial transactions as they occur. For example you could take advantage of new opportunities to increase sales or prevent customer churn.

According to IBM this is being driven by the rise of mobile and smartphones, numbering in the billions in a few years. The combination of massive amounts of data and consumers who are empowered with mobile access is creating a difficult challenge for businesses, IBM noted in the announcement. Consumers now expect an immediate response—the 5 minute rule—to any interaction, at any time, and through their own preferred channel of communication. Unfortunately, many businesses are trying to meet this challenge and deliver instantaneous, on-demand customer service with outdated IT systems that can only provide after-the-fact intelligence.

Said Ross Mauri, General Manager, System z, IBM Systems & Technology Group: “Off-loading operational data in order to perform analytics increases cost and complexity while limiting the ability of businesses to use the insights in a timely manner.” The better approach, he continued, is to turn to an end-to-end solution that makes analytics a part of the flow of transactions and allows companies to gain real time insights while improving their business performance with every transaction.

Of course,  Mauri was referring specifically to the System z.  However, Power Systems and especially the new POWER8 machines, which have a strong presence here at IBM Enterprise2014, can do it too. Speaker after speaker emphasized that the Power machines are optimized for lightning fast analytics, particularly real time analytics.

Still, this was a z announcement so IBM piled on a few more goodies for the z. These include new analytics capabilities for the mainframe to enable better data security and provide companies with the ability to integrate Hadoop big data with the z. Specifically, IBM is delivering:

  • IBM InfoSphere BigInsights for Linux on System z – Combines open-source Apache Hadoop with IBM innovations to deliver enterprise grade Hadoop for System z clients;
  • IBM DB2 Analytics Accelerator – Enhances data security while delivering 2000 times the response time for complex data queries.
  • New capabilities in Linux and the cloud for system z, such as IBM Elastic Storage for Linux on System z, which extends the benefits of Elastic Storage to the Linux environment on z servers, and IBM Cloud Manager with OpenStack for System z, which enables heterogeneous cloud management across System z, Power and x86 environments.

Many of these pieces are available now.  You can meet the 5-minute rule sooner than you may think.

Alan Radding is DancingDinosaur. Follow him on Twitter, @mainframeblog, or check out his website, Technologywriter.com

 


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